I.A.K Bintang
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Comparative study on preferences and quality of poultry meat. ., Triyantini; ., Abubakar; Bintang, I.A.K; Antawidjaja, T
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 2, No 3 (1997)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (773.014 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v2i3.63

Abstract

A study was conducted to examine physical and nutritional compositions as well as carcass preferences of broilers, native chickens, ducks and muscovy using 25 birds from each species . Parameters measured were : percentage of carcass, part of carcass and by-products, carcass quality, tenderness, water, protein, fat and ash contents of meat and skin . Preference test was conducted on thigh and breast meat, as well as whole carcass and cuts. The results of the study showed that the carcass quality of native chicken and ducks were better than the carcass of broilers and muscovy, and over 80% of them were considered as first class quality . The carcass percentage of broilers was higher than the native chickens, ducks and muscovy (P < 0 .01) . The tenderness of breast meat was not significantly different, (36 .16-40 .84 kg/second), however, the tenderness of broiler thigh meat was the highest (61 .77 kg/second) among other meat (P < 0 .01). Protein content of duck breast meat was the lowest, while the protein content of duck thigh meat and the muscovy were higher than that of broilers and native chickens (P < 0 .05) . Fat content of broilers thigh meat was the highest as compared to other poultry meats (P < 0 .01) . Organoleptic test showed that the taste of breast and thigh meat of native chicken, duck and muscovy were similar with that of broilers, however the appearance and color of carcass of broilers and muscovy were more accepted than that of native chickens and ducks (P < 0.05). The meat of native chickens, ducks and muscovy were considered as good protein sources as judged by the physical appearances, nutritional composition and the preferences test .   Keywords : Poultry meat, quality, preference
The use of sago waste (Metroxylon sago) and its fermentation product as a feedstuff for growing duck Antawidjaja, Tata; Bintang, I.A.K; Sinurat, A.P; Kompiang, I.P
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 2, No 3 (1997)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (617.969 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v2i3.66

Abstract

study were 14 days old local male duckling . The experimental rations were formulated to contain unfermented or fermented of sago waste at graded level of 5, 10, 15 and 20%. A ration without sago waste was also formulated and used as a control diet . All rations were formulated to be isoprotein and isoenergy, i .e . : 17% crude protein and 2,700 kcal ME/kg, respectively. Feed was pelleted and were given ad libitum. The experimental design used was completely randomized with 4 replicates, and each replicate consisted of 10 ducklings . The trial was conducted until 8 weeks old . The fermentation process could increase the nutrient content in sago waste . The unfermented sago waste could be included up to 5% in ration of duckling . At the higher, the final body weight and body weight gain were lowered as compared to the control ration . The fermentation process could be used up to 10%. The use of sago waste did not affect the feed consumption, percentage of carcass and liver weight significantly . Ration with 15% sago waste product a heavier giblets than the control ration . The use of fermented sago waste   at 20% in the ration gave the FCR value higher as compared to control ration . It is necessary to study further the protein quality of fermented sago waste .   Keywords: Sago waste, fermentation, male duck
Effect of various dietary nutrient density on the growth performance of local male ducks and their crosse Bintang, I.A.K; Silalahi, M; ., Antawidjaja; Raharjo, Y.C
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 2, No 4 (1998)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (581.682 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v2i4.78

Abstract

Three hundred day-old male ducklings were allocated randomly into 12 treatment combinations in 3 x 4 factorial design . Three levels of dietary density ration i.e : Low(12% /2,000 kcal), medium (16%/2,500 kcal) and high (20%/3,000 kcal) and 2 breeds of local ducks Tegal (TT) and Mojosari (MM) and their crossbreds (Tegal x Mojosari (TM) and Mojosari x Tegal (MT)) were applied. Each treatment combination consisted of5 replicates, each of 5 birds. The experiment was carried out for 8 weeks and measurements were weekly feed intake, body weight, weight and/or percentage of carcass, internal organs and abdominal fat. Results indicated that no significant interaction was detected between dietary nutrient density and the breeds of ducks on all parameters measured . Breeds of duck, as well as their crosses did not affect growth performance and other parameters . On the other hand, nutrient density influenced growth performance significantly, except for percentage of carcass and internal organs . In general, feed intake, body weight gain, feed efficiency, carcass weight and abdominal fat of ducks fed low density ration were significantly lower than those fed medium density, which were also lower than those fed high nutrient density diet . Weghtand length of intestine and kidney weight, of ducks fed low density diet however, were higher than the two other treatments .   Keywords : Dietary density ration, breeds of duck, growth
Nutritive value of palm oil sludge fermented with Aspergillus niger after therma1 drying process Purwadaria, T; Sinurat, A.P; ., Supriyati; Hamid, H; Bintang, I.A.K
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 4, No 4 (1999)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (160.3 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v4i4.168

Abstract

Solid substrate fermentation by Aspergillus niger has been carried out to improve the nutritive value of palm oil sludge (POS). POS was fermented aerobically for four days in a fermentor chambers (28°C, RH 80%), with 60% moisture content Some of the product was further incubated anaerobically for 2 days at 28°C. Both products from aerobic and anaerobic fermentation processes were dried by various methods, i.e. sunlight, oven at 60°C, oven with blower at 40°C, at the moisture content less than 11%. Results of the drying methods were also compared with the fresh fermented product. Statistic analysis using factorial design (2 x 4) showed that there was no interaction between kind of fermentation processes (aerobic and anaerobic) and drying methods (fresh, sunlight, oven 60°C, and blower 40°C) for almost all parameters except total a-amino acid content Significant results (p<0.05) were obtained on the drying methods for parameters of crude protein, true protein, in vitro dry matter and protein digestibilities, and mannanase and cellulase activities. There were no significant results between treatments in the crude fiber analysis and soluble nitrogen content Significant results also did not occur between treatment of aerob and anaerob fermentation processes for almost all parameters except for dry matter digestibilities. Results from true protein and in vitro digestibilities show that the fresh fermented product has the best nutritive value, while product dried by sunlight was best among other drying processes. Results from in vivo of protein and energy digestibilities show that there were better metabolizable energy and protein for product with aerobic process and dried with oven and blower treatments, while sunlight drying was best for product processed in anaerobic condition. Although fresh fermented product gave better result from in vitro digestibilities and enzyme activity analyses, for some reasons (easy handling and preservation) sunlight drying gave best results for products processed under anaerobic condition, especially when sunlight drying is cheap.   Key words: Palm oil sludge, fermentation product, Aspergillus niger, thermal drying
Utilization of palm oil sludge in poultry diet: 2. Dried palm oil sludge and its fermented product for growing drakes Sinurat, Arnold P; Bintang, I.A.K; Purwadaria, T; Pasaribu, T
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 6, No 1 (2001)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (133.792 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v6i1.215

Abstract

Inclusion limit of palm oil sludge (POS) in poultry diet varies according to processing, and species or strain of the animal. Therefore, an experiment was conducted to study the utilization of fermented (FPOS) and non-fermented palm oil sludge (POS) for growing drakes. A number of 224 one week-old male ducklings were randomly distributed into 7 dietary treatments, with 4 replicates and 8 ducklings for each replicate. The dietary treatment consists of 2 kinds of feedstuffs (POS and FPOS) with 3 levels (5, 10, and 15%) and one control diet consisting neither POS nor FPOS. All diets were formulated with similar nutrient contents and meet the requirement of growing duckling and fed to 8 weeks old. The results showed that at the first week of the trial, feeding of POS or FPOS significantly (P<0.05) depressed growth of the ducklings, although the feed consumption was higher than the control. However, overall performances (body weight, feed consumption and feed conversion) of the ducklings, carcass yield, liver weight, gizzard weight and abdominal fat weight measured at the end of the trial were not significantly (P>0.05) affected by the dietary treatments. Therefore, it is concluded that it is safe to include POS or FPOS up to 15% in the diet of growing ducklings.   Key words: Palm oil sludge, fermentation, ducks, growth
Utilization of palm oilsludge in poultry diet: 3. Inclusion of fresh or dried fermented palm oil sludge in broiler’s diet Sinurat, A.P; Purwadaria, Tatty; Pasaribu, T; Darma, J; Bintang, I.A.K; Togatorop, M.H
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 6, No 2 (2001)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (134.124 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v6i2.226

Abstract

Drying proces, especially with heating often affects the nutritive values of feed ingredients. Therefore, this experiment was designed to study the responses of broiler chickens when fed with ration containing fresh or dried fermented palm oil sludge(FPOS). Experimental diets with different levels of fresh or dried FPOS (5, 10, and 15% equally to dried FPOS) were formulated with similar nutrient contents. A control diet with no FPOS was also included. Each diet was fed to 30 broiler chickens (5 replicates of 6 birds) for 5 weeks. Performances (body weight, feed consumption, feed conversion, and mortalities) of chickens were recorded. Carcass percentage and abdominal fat content was also measured at the end of feeding trial. Data obtained were subjected to analysis of variance in a completely randomized design and different between means were tested by orthogonal contrast procedures. Results of the experiment showed that body weight gain (BWG) of control birds was not significantlydifferent with BWG of birds fed with FPOS. Birds fed with dried FLS gain more weight  than those fed with fresh FPOS (1048 vs 981 g/bird). Increasing of dietary FPOS levels decreased BWG, but 10% inclusion was still tolerable. Feed consumption of control diet was significantly (P<0.05) less than feed consumption of diet with FPOS. Increasing of dried FPOS to 15% did not affect feed consumption, but increasing of fresh FPOS significantly increased feed consumption. Feed conversion (FCR) of control diet was significantly better than the FPOS diet (2.07 vs 2.13). Increasing levels of dried FPOS from 5 to 10% did not affect the FCR, but further increasing to 15% significantly worsen the FCR. Increasing of fresh FPOS from 5 to 10 or 15 significantly worsen the FCR. Dry matter intake, mortalities, carcass percentage, liver weight, and abdominal fat levels of broilers were not significantly affected by dietary treatments (P>0.05). Conversion of feed dry matter to body weight gain of control diet was not significantly (P>0.05) different with those diets with FPOS. However, dry matter conversion of dried FPOS was significantly better than the fresh FPOS. Increasing levels of FLS from 5 to 15 significantly worsen the feed dry matter conversion but not with inclusion of 10% FPOS. Therefore, it is concluded that there is no superior advantage of feeding fresh FPOS as compared with dried FPOS. Inclusion of 10% dried or fresh FPOS in the diets did not affect growth performances of broiler chickens.   Key words: Palm oil sludge, dried, fermented, broilers
Utilization of palm oil sludge in poultry diet. 4. Inclusion of fresh or dried fermented palm oil sludge in native chickens diet Sinurat, A.P; Purwadaria, T; Pasaribu, T; Darma, J; Bintang, I.A.K; Togatorop, M.H
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 6, No 3 (2001)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (53.569 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v6i3.242

Abstract

Fermentation processes increase the protein of palm oil sludge and produce some useful enzymes. However, drying process, especially with heating often affects the nutritive values of feed ingredients and the enzymes activity. Therefore, this experiment was designed to study the responses of native chickens when fed ration containing fresh or dried fermented palm oil sludge(FPOS). Experimental diets with different levels of fresh or dried FPOS (5, 10 and 15% equal to dried FPOS) were  formulatedwith similar nutrient contents. A control diet with no FPOS was also included. Each treatment was replicated 5  times for 12weeks. Performances (body weight, feed consumption, feed conversion and mortality) of chickens were  recorded. Carcass yield,abdominal fat content, weight of liver and gizzard were measured at the end of feeding trial. Data  were subjected to analysis ofvariance and different between means were tested by orthogonal procedures. Results during the  starting period showed that,chickens fed FPOS diet gain more weight significantly than the control birds (298.1 vs. 264.7).  The dry matter intake of the dryFPOS diet was significantly better than the fresh FPOS diet (2.88 vs. 3.32). The FPOS  dietary levels did not affect body weightgain and dry matter intake of native chickens, significantly. However, increasing the  FPOS levels worsen the dry matterconversion (DCR) significantly. Data during 12 weeks trial showed mat the body weight  gain was not significantly affected bytreatments. The dry matter intake of the FPOS diets were significantly higher than the  control diet (3469 vs. 3065 g/bird), hencethe DCR of the control diet was significantly better than the FPOS diets (3.28 vs.  3.62). Feeding dry FPOS resulted in a betterDCR as compared to fresh FPOS (3.48 vs. 3.76), but not affected the dry matter  intake. The FPOS dietary levels did not affectbody weight gain and dry matter intake of native chickens, significantly.  However, inclusion of 5% FPOS in me diet gave betterDCR significantly, as compared with 15% FPOS (3.51 vs. 3.83).  Feeding dry or fresh FPOS (5 - 15%) did not significantlyaffect the mortality, carcass yield, abdominal fat levels, weight of  liver and weight of gizzard of native chickens. It is concludedthat dry FPOS was better than the fresh FPOS and could be  included in me native chickens diet up to 10%.   Key words: Palm oil sludge, fermentation, native chickens
Utilization of palm oil sludge in poultry diet. 4. Inclusion of fresh or dried fermented palm oil sludge in native chickens diet Sinurat, A.P; Purwadaria, T; Pasaribu, T; Darma, J; Bintang, I.A.K; Togatorop, M.H
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 6, No 4 (2001)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (133.316 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v6i4.243

Abstract

Fermentation processes increase the protein of palm oil sludge and produce some useful enzymes. However, drying process, especially with heating often affects the nutritive values of feed ingredients and the enzymes activity. Therefore, this experiment was designed to study the responses of native chickens when fed ration containing fresh or dried fermented palm oil sludge (FPOS). Experimental diets with different levels of fresh or dried FPOS (5, 10 and 15% equal to dried FPOS) were formulated with similar nutrient contents. A control diet with no FPOS was also included. Each treatment was replicated 5 times for 12 weeks. Performances (body weight, feed consumption, feed conversion and mortality) of chickens were recorded. Carcass yield, abdominal fat content, weight of liver and gizzard were measured at the end of feeding trial. Data were subjected to analysis of variance and different between means were tested by orthogonal procedures. Results during the starting period showed that, chickens fed FPOS diet gain more weight significantly than the control birds (298.1 vs. 264.7). The dry matter intake of the dry FPOS diet was significantly better than the fresh FPOS diet (2.88 vs. 3.32). The FPOS dietary levels did not affect body weight gain and dry matter intake of native chickens, significantly. However, increasing the FPOS levels worsen the dry matter conversion (DCR) significantly. Data during 12 weeks trial showed mat the body weight gain was not significantly affected by treatments. The dry matter intake of the FPOS diets were significantly higher than the control diet (3469 vs. 3065 g/bird), hence the DCR of the control diet was significantly better than the FPOS diets (3.28 vs. 3.62). Feeding dry FPOS resulted in a better DCR as compared to fresh FPOS (3.48 vs. 3.76), but not affected the dry matter intake. The FPOS dietary levels did not affect body weight gain and dry matter intake of native chickens, significantly. However, inclusion of 5% FPOS in me diet gave better DCR significantly, as compared with 15% FPOS (3.51 vs. 3.83). Feeding dry or fresh FPOS (5 - 15%) did not significantly affect the mortality, carcass yield, abdominal fat levels, weight of liver and weight of gizzard of native chickens. It is concluded that dry FPOS was better than the fresh FPOS and could be included in me native chickens diet up to 10%.   Key words: Palm oil sludge, fermentation, native chickens
Responses of broilers to Aloe vera bioactives as feed additive: The effect of different forms and levels of bioactives on performances of broilers Sinurat, A.P; Purwadaria, T; Togatorop, M.H; Pasaribu, T; Bintang, I.A.K; Sitompul, S; Rosida, J
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 7, No 2 (2002)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (137.366 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v7i2.277

Abstract

Feed additives are commonly used in poultry feed as growth promotors or to improve feed efficiency. Previous results showed that Aloe vera bioactives could improve feed efficiency in broilers. Therefore, a further study was designed in order to obtain optimum doses and application methods of bioactives for broiler chickens. Aloe vera was prepared in different forms (fresh gel, dry gel, fresh whole leaf or dry whole leaf). The aloe was supplemented into the feed with concentrations of 0.25; 0.5 and 1 g/kg (equal to dry gel). Standard diets with or without antibiotics were also included as control. The diets were fed to broilers from day old to 5 weeks and the performances were observed. Results showed that the aloe-bioactives did not significantly (P>0.05) affect final body weight of broilers as compared with the control. Supplementation of 0.25 g/kg fresh gel, 0.25 and 1.0 g/kg dry gel significantly improved feed convertion by 4.7; 4.8 and 8.2%, respectively as compared with the control. This improvement was a result of reduction in feed intake or dry matter intake without reducing the weight gain. However, supplementation of whole aloe leafs could not improve feed convertion in boilers. It is concluded that the bioactives of Aloe vera could be used as feed supplement to improve feed efficiency in broilers with no deleterious effect on weight gain, carcass yield, abdominal fat levels and internal organs. The effective concentrations of aloe gell as a feed supplement based on dry matter convertion were from 0.25 g/kg fresh gel, 0.25 and 1.0 g/kg dry gel.   Key words: Broilers, feed efficiency, feed additives, Aloe vera
Response of broilers on the diet containing fermented palm oil sludge stored at various length of time Bintang, I.A.K; Sinurat, A.P; Purwadaria, T
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 8, No 2 (2003)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (129.024 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v8i2.375

Abstract

An experiment was conducted to study the response of broilers on the diet containing fermented palm oil sludge with Aspergillus niger stored at different length of time. The research was carried out in Research Institute for Animal Production Ciawi, Bogor. The experiment was conducted based on completely randomized design using 245 day old broiler chicks with 5 replicates. They were allotted to 7 diets containing one control without palm oil sludge (R0), 5 and 10% of fresh-fermented palm oil sludge (LSF) (R1 and R2), 5 and 10% of LSF stored at room temperature for 2 months (R3 and R4) and stored for 3 months (R5 and R6). Diets were fed ad libitum for 5 weeks. Feed intake, weight gain, feed conversion ratio, and carcass yields were observed as parameters. Results showed that no parameters were significantly affected by the treatments. It is concluded that 10% of fermented palm oil sludge could be included in diet of broilers even after three months storage at room temperature.   Key words: Broiler, fermented palm oil sludge, storage period