V.S. Lestari
Faculty of Animal Agriculture, Hasanuddin University Makassar, South Sulawesi

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FACTORS INFLUENCING BIOSECURITY ADOPTION ON LAYING HEN FARMERS Lestari, V.S.; Natsir, A.; Sirajuddin, S.N.; Kasim, K.; Ali, H.M.; Saadah, S.; Mawardi, M.
Journal of the Indonesian Tropical Animal Agriculture Vol 37, No 4 (2012): (December)
Publisher : Diponegoro University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (57.62 KB) | DOI: 10.14710/jitaa.37.4.302-307

Abstract

The present study was undertaken to identify factors that influences biosecurity adoption on layinghen farmers in Sidrap district, South Sulawesi. This district was choosen because beside it was famousas the center of laying hen farms, it was also as one of districts in South Sulawesi which suffered fromAvian influenza outbreak. Total samples were 60 respondents. The samples were choosen throughstratified random sampling from two subdistricts which had the most populous of layer smallholders,namely Baranti and Maritengngae. Data were obtained through observations and interviews using aquestionnaire. Data were analyzed using a score based on biosecurity status. Biosecurity status wasobtained based on the adoption of biosecurity measures which consisted of 9 stages: farm inputs, trafficonto farms, distance from sources of pathogens to shed, exposure of farm, biosecurity at farm boundary,biosecurity between farm boundary and shed, biosecurity at the shed door, traffic into the shed andsusceptibility of the flock. Multiple regression model was employed to analyze the data. The studyrevealed that the adoption biosecurity were associated with gender, age, education, farming experience,farm-income, family size and social capital. These variables contributed 20% variation in biosecurityadoption of laying hen farms. However, only farm income, family size and social capital were the majorfactors influencing to the adoption of biosecurity (P<0.05).
ADOPTION OF BIOSECURITY MEASURES BY LAYER SMALLHOLDERS Lestari, V.S.; Sirajuddin, S.N.; Kasim, K.
Journal of the Indonesian Tropical Animal Agriculture Vol 36, No 4 (2011): (December)
Publisher : Diponegoro University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (97.239 KB) | DOI: 10.14710/jitaa.36.4.297-302

Abstract

It was indicated that layer smallholders awareness of biosecurity was low. This paper aimed todetermine the level of adoption within the South Sulawesi layer smallholders of a range of standardbiosecurity measures. Sidenreng Rappang (Sidrap) regency was chosen as a location of the research,because it was famous as a central of layer smallholders. Total sample was 60 respondents. The samplewas chosen through random sampling from two districts which were the most populous of layersmallholders, namely Baranti and Maritengae. Data were collected using structured questionnaires anddepth-interview. The data were tabulated and analysed using a simple method of scoring with regard totheir biosecurity status. The status of biosecurity was used to know the level of biosecurity adoption.Biosecurity status was obtained based on the adoption of biosecurity measures which consisted of 9stages: farm inputs, traffic onto farms, distance from sources of pathogens to shed, exposure of farm,biosecurity at farm boundary, biosecurity between farm boundary and shed, biosecurity at the shed door,traffic into the shed and susceptibility of the flock. Using adoption index, this research revealed thatbiosecurity adoption of layer smallholders in South Sulawesi was classified into a ?partial adopter?.
DIGESTION OF HIGH FIBER DIET IN SHEEP AND GOAT OF JENEPPONTO Rahardja, D.P.; Lestari, V.S.; Hatta, M.
Journal of the Indonesian Tropical Animal Agriculture Vol 35, No 3 (2010): (September)
Publisher : Diponegoro University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (66.023 KB) | DOI: 10.14710/jitaa.35.3.151-157

Abstract

Four does (goat, G) and four ewes (sheep, S) of Jeneponto were fed chaffed rice straw hay (3.7%crude protein, 63.5% cell wall constituents, 44.5% acid detergent fiber and 6.2% acid detergent lignin,all based on dry matter). The intakes and digestibility of the diet by G and S were compared. Bothspecies consumed the same level of the diet. G digested dry matter, organic matter, crude protein, crudefiber, and lignin of the diet to a significant higher extent than did by S. The superiority of G over S indigesting the diet was attributable with longer retention time of ruminal fluid and particulate matters inthe rumen and the entire gut, which then resulted in higher proportion of small size particles (<1 mmsieve), higher proportions of propionic, butyric, valeric and isovaleric acid concentrations produced inthe rumen. Additionally for further studies, there were some possibilities of G having a better chewingactivity (duration and intensity), and ability to maintain higher rumen ammonia levels by a greater urearecycle to the rumen, particularly through salivation.
HYPOCHOLESTEROLEMIC EFFECT OF GARLIC POWDER IN LAYING HEN: LOW CHOLESTEROL EGG? Rahardja, D.P.; Hakim, M.R.; Pakiding, W.; Lestari, V.S.
Journal of the Indonesian Tropical Animal Agriculture Vol 35, No 1 (2010): (March)
Publisher : Diponegoro University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (133.089 KB) | DOI: 10.14710/jitaa.35.1.16-21

Abstract

Forty laying hens Hysex Brown consisting of 2 age groups (27 and 77 weeks of age) were used inthe study to elucidate the hypocholesterolemic effect of garlic powder on egg production, serum and eggcholesterol. They were caged individually and fed diet containing 0 (control), 1, 2, and 4% oven driedgarlic powder for 4 periods of 4 weeks. The old hens consumed more food compared to those of theyoung one, while water consumption was in the reverse condition. The egg production indicated by theyoung hens fed dietary 1 and 2% garlic powder was significantly higher than those fed control diet.However, the old hens produced heavier eggs than those of the young hens, particularly when 1% garlicpowder was supplemented. There was a closed relationship between serum and egg cholesterol, whichreduced gradually with longer time the hens fed dietary garlic. The results clearly demonstrated that thelaying hens fed dietary garlic powder up to 4% produced egg containing lower cholesterol (-34%)compared to those fed control diet; The hypocholesterolemic effect of garlic powder is apparently higherin the old hen compared to that in the young hen.