T Purwadaria
Balai Penelitian Ternak

Published : 68 Documents
Articles

Role of Nano-Mineral as A Feed Additive to Enhance Animal Productivity and Quality of Animal Products Kurnia, Frans; Suhardiman, M; Purwadaria, T; Stephani, L
WARTAZOA. Indonesian Bulletin of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 22, No 4 (2012): DECEMBER 2012
Publisher : Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (167.507 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/wartazoa.v22i4.968

Abstract

A development of nanotechnology today has penetrated almost all areas of life. Utilization in improving livestock production can be done by replacing commonly used conventional mineral by nanoparticles-mineral. Application of chromium (Cr), selenium (Se), silver (Ag) and copper (Cu) nanoparticles are reported to improve livestock production. However, the potential risk of the application such as mineral deposit in the body of animal itself and to people as consumers of livestock product has to be evaluated. Nanoparticle-minerals that have smaller size are easier to penetrate the cells and it is suspected that it may give more negative risk. Analysis evaluation of nanoparticle-minerals in the animal including people are still being developed. Key words: Nanoparticle-minerals, Cr, Se, Ag, Cu
Cassapro in broiler ration : effect of halquinol Supplementation Kompiang, I.P; Sinurat, A.P; Purwadaria, T; Darma, J; ., Supriyati
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 2, No 3 (1997)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (281.533 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v2i3.67

Abstract

A trial was conducted to determine the effect of various level of cassapro (fermented cassava) and halquinol supplementation on the performance of broiler chickens . Experimental rations were formulated isoprotein and isoenergy with graded level of cassapro (0, 10, 20 and 30%) . The 20 and 30% cassapro ration were prepared without and with halquinol supplementation (60 ppm). Each ration was fed to 40 of three day old broilers, divided into 4 cages ( 5 males and 5 females per cage) for 4 weeks. Increasing the level of cassapro significantly reduced body weight gain (P < 0.005), increased feed conversion ratio (FCR) (P < 0.0005) with no effect on feed intake (P < 0.10) . Halquinol supplementation has no effect on feed intake, but significantly increased body weight gain (P <0.05) and improved the FCR (P < 0.01) . It is concluded that high level of cassapro in the ration will cause poorer performance of the birds, however it can be alleviated by halquinolsupplementation.   Keywords: Broiler, cassapro, halquinol
Nutritive value of fermented coconut meal in ration of laying ducks with various phosphorous levels Sinurat, A.P; Purwadaria, T; Habiebie, A; Pasaribu, T; Hamid, H; Rosida, J; Haryati, T; Sutikno, I
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 3, No 1 (1998)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (697.545 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v3i1.88

Abstract

A series of experiment was conducted to improve the utilization of coconut meal in poultry ration . A bioprocess (fermentation) approach was adopted. Coconut meal was fermented followed by an enzymatic process at room temperature or 50 OC.The nutritive value of the fermented products was determined chemically. Product with the highest nutritive value was then used for a feeding trial to study the interaction effect between dietary levels of fermented coconut meal and phosphorous level on the performances of laying ducks. Nine experimental diets were formulated, i.e ., the factorial of 3 levels of fermented coconut meal (0, 30 and 40%) and 3 levels of total phosphorous (0.6, 0.8 and 1 .0%) . The diet was fed to pullet ducks and the performances of the ducks were observed for 16 weeks of production period. The results showed that the nutritive value of coconut meal increased by fermentation and the highest yield was achieved when the enzymatic process was performed at 500C. There was no significant interaction effect between dietary fermented coconut meal levels and the phosphorous levels on all parameters observed, except on egg weight. Inclusion of fermented coconut meal in the ration up to 30% did not produce negative effects on the productivity oflaying ducks, however, higher levels (40%) ofinclusion reduced the egg size   Keywords: Coconut meal, fermentation, ducks, egg production
The changes of peroxide number of coconut meal during storage and fermentation processed with Aspergillus nige Hamid, Helmi; Purwadaria, T; Haryati, T; Ketaren, A.P
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 4, No 2 (1999)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (156.512 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v4i2.145

Abstract

The effect of fermentation process and duration of storage of fermented coconut meal with Aspergillus niger on its peroxide number has been studied. First stage of experiment was arranged in a completely randomized design with four treatments (raw coconut meal, 0 and 4 day aerobic fermentation incubation and after 2 day anaerobic enzymatic incubation). The peroxide number was determined as potentiality for rancidity. The three incubation processes decreased the peroxide number significantly. The highest reduction was obtained at 4 day aerobic fermentation (49.7%). The decrease of peroxide number of fermented coconut meal was correlated with the decrease of lipid content. The regression coefficient is highly significant (r2 = 0.76, P<0.01). In the second experiment, the effect of storage on the peroxide number of fermented product was conducted by factorial design 2x3x4 i.e., two type of substrates (fermented and non fermented coconut meal), 3 storage temperatures (-13, 4, and 29oC) and 4 storage times (1, 2, 3, and 4 months). Statistical analysis for lipid contents showed that there was significant interaction (P<0.05) between kind of substrates and storage time. The lipid content of fermented product was decreasing from the first up to the third month of storage, then it was increasing at the fourth month, but the lipid content of non fermented coconut meal did not significantly changed (P>0.05). Statistical analysis for the peroxide number showed that there was highly significant interaction between the type of substrates and storage temperature. The peroxide number on the fermented products did not significantly increase, where as the non fermented products show significantly increased during storage course. The significant interaction between storage duration and temperature observed. At low temperatures (-13 and 4°C) storage the peroxide number increased 44%, while at high temperature (29°C) up to 95%. The highest peroxide number on the fermented product (43.5 ppm) was obtained at the temperature storage of 29°C for 4 month period. This value is still under rancidity limit (80 ppm). It could be concluded that fermentation process reduced the rancidity of coconut meal.   Key words : Coconut meal, fermentation, peroxide number, Aspergillus niger
Fermented and unfermented palm kernel cake as broiler chicken Ketaren, P.P; Sinurat, A.P; Zainuddin, D; Purwadaria, T; Kompiang, I.P
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 4, No 2 (1999)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (126.314 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v4i2.146

Abstract

feed. Two hundred and ten, day-old broiler chicks were used for this study. They were allotted to 6 different diets containing either BIS or FBIS at 3 different levels (5, 10 and 15%) and one control diet. The results showed that 5% BIS and 5% FBIS could be used in broiler diet without adversely affecting feed intake, weight gain and feed conversion ratio. FCR of those diets were significantly (P<0.05) better than the control diet. Carcass yields were not significantly affected by feeding of BIS nor FBIS. The FBIS diet produced less abdominal fat than the BIS diet.   Key words : Palm kernel cake, fermentation, broilers
kernel meal and its fermented product for growing ducks Bintang, I.A.K; Sinurat, A.P; Murtisari, T; Pasaribu, T; Purwadaria, T; Haryati, T
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 4, No 3 (1999)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v4i3.156

Abstract

A series of experiment was carried out to evaluate the use of palm kernel meal and its fermented product in the ration of growing ducks. Treatments were arranged in a 2x3 factorial experiment, i.e. the combination between two processes (unfermented and fermented palm kernel meal) and three levels of ingredients in the diet (5, 10 and 15%). Four replicates were applied for each treatment, with 8 ducklings in each replicate. A control diet with no palm kernel meal was also formulated. All diets were formulated to have a similar protein and ME contents. Results of the experiment showed that fermentation process increased the nutrient composition (crude protein, true protein, phosphorus, and the metabolizable energy) and reduced its fibre and fat content. The feeding trial showed that neither the fermentation process, levels of ingredients nor the interactions of the two factors affected final body weight, feed consumption, feed conversion, carcass percentage and abdominal fat of the ducklings significantly. It is concluded that fermentation process improved the nutritional value of palm kernel meal and the inclusion of palm kernel meal (unfermented and fermented), up to 15% in the diet of ducks did not negatively affect the growthperformance and the carcass yield.   Key words : Ducks, palm kernel meal, fermentation
Nutritive value of palm oil sludge fermentation by some incubation process I.A.B, Bintang; Sinurat, A.P; Purwadaria, T; Pasaribu, T
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 5, No 1 (2000)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (126.532 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v5i1.173

Abstract

An experiment was conducted to study the effect of fermented palm oil sludge (PaS) incubated with different ways towards metabolic digestibility on dry matter,true metabolizable energy (TME) and protein digestibilities. A completely randomized design was used. Treatments consisted of unfermented pas (control) and fermented pas with and without enzymatic incubation proces, two levels of incubation temperatures (28°C and 32°C) and three levels of incubation times (3, 4 and 5 days). The digestibility studies were carried out in 46 layer. The results showed that the dry matter digestibility of P_S was not significantly affected by fermentation process neither by incubation times. TME was not affected by fermentation process and incubation times, but it was significantly affected by incubation temperatures during fennentation (P<0,05). Incubation temperatures at 3rC more significant than 28°C. Enzimatic process was more significant than without enzimatic process. True metabolizable energy was highly significantly affected by enzimatic process (P<O,OI). Protein digestibility was highly significantly affected by time and incubation process (P<O,Ol), but not significantly affected by temperatures incubation. It was concluded that fermentation process could improve the digestibility of palm oil sludge (paS). The best result obtained from incubation at 32°C for 3 days and continued by enzimatic process.   Key words: Fennentation, nutritive value, palm oil sludge
Utilization of palm oil sludge in poultry diet. 1. Dried palm oil sludge and its fermented product in broiler’s diet Sinurat, A.P; Purwadaria, T; Ketaren, P.P; Zainuddin, D; Kompiang, I.P
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 5, No 2 (2000)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (128.433 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v5i2.206

Abstract

Palm oil sludge a by product of palm oil industry is not commonly used in poultry feed due to some limiting factors such as low protein and amino acids content and high fiber content. These limiting factors were expected to be reduced by fermentation technology. Therefore an experiment was conducted to study the use of fermented (FLS) and non-fermented palm oil sludge (LS) for broiler chicken feed. Two hundred and ten day-old broiler chicks were used for this study. The birds were allocated into 35 cages with 6 birds in each cage. Each 5 group of birds were fed with one of 7 experimental diets. All diets were formulated with similar nutrient contents containing either LS or FLS at 3 different levels (5, 10 and 15%) and a control diet with no LS or FLS. The experimental diets were fed for 6 weeks and the performances were observed. Carcass yield, abdominal fat, weight of liver and gizzard were also measured at the end of the trial. The results showed that LS or FLS can be included in broiler’s diet, since the mortality, carcass yield, abdominal fat, liver and gizzard were not significantly affected. Best level inclusion of LS was 5%. Although inclusion of 10-15% LS did not affect growth and feed conversion significantly, the feed intake was significantly depressed. The best level inclusion of FLS was 10%, since higher level (15%) caused growth depression.   Key words: Palm oil sludge, fermentation, broilers
Utilization of palm oil sludge in poultry diet: 2. Dried palm oil sludge and its fermented product for growing drakes Sinurat, Arnold P; Bintang, I.A.K; Purwadaria, T; Pasaribu, T
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 6, No 1 (2001)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (133.792 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v6i1.215

Abstract

Inclusion limit of palm oil sludge (POS) in poultry diet varies according to processing, and species or strain of the animal. Therefore, an experiment was conducted to study the utilization of fermented (FPOS) and non-fermented palm oil sludge (POS) for growing drakes. A number of 224 one week-old male ducklings were randomly distributed into 7 dietary treatments, with 4 replicates and 8 ducklings for each replicate. The dietary treatment consists of 2 kinds of feedstuffs (POS and FPOS) with 3 levels (5, 10, and 15%) and one control diet consisting neither POS nor FPOS. All diets were formulated with similar nutrient contents and meet the requirement of growing duckling and fed to 8 weeks old. The results showed that at the first week of the trial, feeding of POS or FPOS significantly (P<0.05) depressed growth of the ducklings, although the feed consumption was higher than the control. However, overall performances (body weight, feed consumption and feed conversion) of the ducklings, carcass yield, liver weight, gizzard weight and abdominal fat weight measured at the end of the trial were not significantly (P>0.05) affected by the dietary treatments. Therefore, it is concluded that it is safe to include POS or FPOS up to 15% in the diet of growing ducklings.   Key words: Palm oil sludge, fermentation, ducks, growth
Use of termite (Glyptotermes montanus) as poultry feed Ketaren, P.P; Sinurat, A.P; Purwadaria, T; Kompiang, I.P; Amir, M
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 6, No 2 (2001)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (143.099 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v6i2.225

Abstract

Termites containing high protein and various enzymes including cellulase enzyme produced by microbes in its digestive system. An experiment was conducted to evaluate the use of termite (Glyptotermes montanus) as poultry feed. One hundred and seventy five, day-old broiler chicks were used for this experiment. The broiler chickens were allotted to seven different diets: (1) control diet containing rice bran without termite (KD), (2) KD + 0.75% dried termites (RK), (3) KD + 1.50% RK, (4) KD + 3.00% RK, (5) KD + 14% fresh termite (RB), (6) KD + 4.29% RB, (7) KD + 8.57% RB. Feed intake, weight gain, feed conversion ratio (FCR), mortality, carcass and visceral were recorded for five weeks experiment. The results showed that chickens fed the diet containing 1.50% RK grew significantly (P<0.05) bigger than other diets. Feed intake of chickens fed KD + 1.50% RK was also significantly (P<0.05) higher than chickens fed other diet but was not significantly (P>0.05) different from feed intake of chickens fed KD, KD + 3.00% RK and KD + 8.57% RB. FCR of chickens fed RK or RB were not significantly different (P>0.05) from FCR of KD diet. Carcass weight of broiler chickens fed KD + 1.50% RK significantly (P<0.05) higher than carcass weight of chickens fed KD diet or improved carcass percentage of about 4.4%. This experiment also showed that the inclusion of termites in the diet significantly (P<0.05) increased percentage of gizzard, heart and abdominal fat weight of chickens.   Key words: Termite, feed ingredient, broiler chicken, carcass