Adi Suryani, Adi
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HOW DOES POST DISASTER SOCIAL COMMUNICATION CATALYZE COMMUNITY RESILIENCE AND EDUCATION? Suryani, Adi; Soedarso, Soedarso
MIMBAR (Jurnal Sosial dan Pembangunan) Vol 35, No 2 (2019): Vol 35, No 2 (2019): Volume 35, No. 1, Year 2019 [Accredited Sinta 2] No 10/E/K
Publisher : Universitas Islam Bandung

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.29313/mimbar.v35i2.5056

Abstract

Palu multi-disasters in 2018 caused life crisis. Many infrastructures and social structures were destroyed. Many people suffer from calamity. This life-threatening situation left bitter experiences. After disasters, they engage in social interaction to survive and re-develop. They are gradually adapting, rebuilding, and learning from experiences.  This study aims to examine how social communication may catalyze community resilience and be self-educated community. The data are collected through direct observation by examining physical environment and direct disaster experiences. The data are analyzed using analytic induction. The study indicated that daily social communication can potentially facilitate Palu?s community learning and resilience in four primary ways. Firstly, through communication, the people could share their disaster emotional experience which allows them to relieve their anxiety, insecurity, fear and panic. Secondly, they could disseminate local knowledge on problem-solving. Thirdly, social communication facilitates social actions to recover. Fourthly, it allows the young generation to learn.
COLLECTIVE LEARNING IN A LEARNING ORGANIZATION: GROWING TEAM LEARNING CULTURE TO SURVIVE AND DEVELOP Suryani, Adi
Jurnal Sosial Humaniora Vol 5, No 2 (2012)
Publisher : Institut Teknologi Sepuluh Nopember

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (438.109 KB) | DOI: 10.12962/j24433527.v5i2.616

Abstract

A learning organization has a deep culture of learning. It is constantlyencourage its member to learn. This learning activity is not only for adapting tothe rapid changing of its internal and external environment, but also forgrowing. The effort of a learning organization to create a conducive learningclimate can be indicated by training its members. Working towards a learningorganization has both its strengths and drawbacks. The strengths are it canimprove the organization performance and organization survival. However,learning too rapid can lead to learning stress. Moreover it can lead to harshinternal competition.
REDEFINING THE POTENTIAL ROLE OF CHARISMATIC LANGUAGE TEACHERS IN CREATING SUPPORTIVE ACADEMIC ATMOSPHERE THROUGH STUDENTS’ MOTIVATIONAL AROUSAL Suryani, Adi
Jurnal Sosial Humaniora Vol 9, No 1 (2016)
Publisher : Institut Teknologi Sepuluh Nopember

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (268.908 KB) | DOI: 10.12962/j24433527.v9i1.1279

Abstract

Charismatic language teachers have considerable potentials to nurture motivations in their students. They have personal magnetism which frequently they exhibit through their characters, communication, and how they develop relationship with their students. Charismatic teachers tend to be energetic, emphatic, warm, express confidence, love challenge, communicate vision, develop warm communication, put concern, trust, be inspiring and motivational. These characters allow them to be role model and inspire their motivation to their students. Their trusting behaviour also can lead to the creation of supportive classroom climate since supportive learning situation needs sense of autonomy. By having this sense of autonomy, students can voice their perspectives, beliefs and finally develop their autonomy self-regulation. By using their personal aura, charismatic language teachers can stimulate their students’ inner motivation.  
Laying the Foundation of Teaching in Digital Era: What Happens to Teachers when Technology Changes Rapidly Suryani, Adi
Proceeding of International Conference on Teacher Training and Education Vol 1, No 1 (2016): Proceeding of International Conference on Teacher Training and Education
Publisher : Sebelas Maret University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (663.585 KB)

Abstract

Teachers may not always obtain professional training to improve themselves. Frequently, they have to learnby themselves, explore ways by their own, and do some trials and errors. They can be successful or fail.They have to do their own learning journey. This frequently happens when teachers have to work with ICT.The flourish, popularity and reputation of ICT in education seem very appealing, but at the same timeprovide new challenges. The Interactivity, creativity, affection, cognition, speed and transferability featuresof ICT may tempt teachers to use it in their teaching. However, teachers may face difficulty when they haveto change by adopting new technology, but they do not know what to do, where to start and who can or willhappily help them, especially when other teachers are busy with their own works. This indicates that thecoming of ICT bring joy, but also difficulty for teachers. This ICT learning difficulties/challenges areheightened by the nature of ICT which changes and expands rapidly. In this study, I intend to express myreflection on my own teaching practice and my analysis on one of my colleagues teaching experience in ourICT self-learning: what issues we encounter, what we obtain and miss in our learning journey, and whataspects affect our learning. We find that professional help for teachers does not always come when it isneeded. There are many times when teachers should face their teaching field independently (withoutprofessional training). However, we find that embedding ICT into teaching-learning now becomes not onlya trend, but also a need. To do this, teachers should be explorative, adaptive and reflective learners. Thereare many challenges that we have to face during the learning process which relate to teacher, students andenvironment aspects which require us to do exploratory, experiential and social learning. Genuine learningmay come from self-learning on what we need in our teaching practice and observation on whatenvironment provides or not provide for our learning.
ICT IN EDUCATION: ITS BENEFITS, DIFFICULTIES, AND ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT ISSUES Suryani, Adi
Jurnal Sosial Humaniora Vol 1, No 1 (2008)
Publisher : Institut Teknologi Sepuluh Nopember

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (308.077 KB) | DOI: 10.12962/j24433527.v1i1.677

Abstract

This essay describes some benefits of implementing ICT in classroom, especially within the area of collaborative and self-managed learning. However, implementing ICT in classroom is not an easy and simple matter. There are many issues which should be addressed. Those issues range from the school culture, teachers barriers, finance, leadership, curriculum, and ethical issues. Those problems are experienced by both developed and developing countries. This also refutes a widespread assumption that developing countries experience more barriers for implementing ICT than developed countries.  
HOME-SCHOOL INTERACTION: REMODELLING A FRAMEWORK OF PARENTS-TEACHERS RELATIONSHIP FOR SUPPORTING STUDENTS’ LEARNING Suryani, Adi
Jurnal Sosial Humaniora Vol 6, No 1 (2013)
Publisher : Institut Teknologi Sepuluh Nopember

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (507.463 KB) | DOI: 10.12962/j24433527.v6i1.607

Abstract

Family and school are not separated social institution. Many parents view that it is schools and teachers which and who should be responsible for their children education. These views should be challenged by arising concern and awareness of parents and teachers of the importance of shared responsibility and cooperativeness. Parents are responsible for laying the basic/foundation of children’s learning, basic values, moral education, and basic social learning. Teachers and schools bear responsibility for developing those basic education. During their learning at school, students have a chance to develop their social competence. School also can be environment where children are gradually learning to be adult learners. They can be adult learners through engaging in collaborative learning activities. Through this social learning, children can learn develop social concern and sensitivity. Moreover, they can develop their learning through experience.
The Role of Teachers’ Experiential Learning and Reflection for Enhanching their Autonomous Personal and Professional Development Suryani, Adi; Widyastuti, Tri
Jurnal Sosial Humaniora Vol 8, No 1 (2015)
Publisher : Institut Teknologi Sepuluh Nopember

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (248.713 KB) | DOI: 10.12962/j24433527.v8i1.1239

Abstract

Today’s teachers are not only teaching, but they have to fulfill various educational roles. This situation demands teachers to learn continuously. They should develop themselves to improve students’ achievement. To grow continuously, teachers should not just wait for formal, instructed or top-down training or learning. They should be autonomous and self directed. They should be aware and analyze what they need and how they should obtain knowledge or skill that they need. Autonomous teachers learn by reflecting their daily teaching and learning experiences. They use their experience as opportunity to learn. There are three main sources of teachers’ learning: their teaching experiences, sharing ideas in professional communities, and by researching.     
A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS ON: THE SIMILARITIES AND DIFFERENCES OF THE THE PHILOSOPHICAL PERSPECTIVE AND METHODOLOGY ADOPTED IN TWO DIFFERENT QUALITATIVE RESEARCHES Suryani, Adi
Jurnal Sosial Humaniora Vol 6, No 2 (2013)
Publisher : Institut Teknologi Sepuluh Nopember

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (479.803 KB) | DOI: 10.12962/j24433527.v6i2.603

Abstract

Qualitative research has substantial philosophical dimension difference from quantitative research. Instead of adopting positivism, qualitative research focuses on more interpretivism and Relativism philosophical perspectives. From these two analyzed researches (Local responses to decentralization policy in Indonesia and Two sides of the same coin: Modernity and tradition in Islamic Education in Indonesia), we learn that both of them put their research stance on interpretivism and constructionism, eventhough they use different methodology. This different methodology emerges because of different focus, goals (objectives), and questions of the research. The Two sides of the same coin uses ethnographic method, while The Local responses adopts interview and official document analysis. Because The Two sides of the same coin adopts ethnographic methodology, it takes one Pesantren as its research site and research it as one whole system. Meanwhile, The Local responses takes six secondary school students to be interviewed. Thus, qualitative researches can be vary depending on research goals (objectives), focus, and problems (questions.       
“I am an Old Car, My Engine is not Powerful Anymore,” A Senior Teacher’s Voice on his ICT Learning, Obstacles and Its’ Implications for Teachers’ Development Suryani, Adi
International Journal of Pedagogy and Teacher Education Vol 1, No 2 (2017): International Journal of Pedagogy and Teacher Education (IJPTE)
Publisher : Fakultas Keguruan dan Ilmu Pendidikan, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20961/ijpte.v1i2.15000

Abstract

 The infiltration of ICT into education sector is inevitable. ICT can assist teachers in their teaching and learning practices. However, some teachers may not digital natives who are ready and can learn ICT quickly or happy to learn it naturally and effortlessly. Difficult choice between staying in comfort zone or following technological changes frequently happens to old (senior) teachers. For them, this era can be different from their era. Consequently, they may feel the tension of transition between convention or how they usually do and modernity or follow recent technological changes. This paper aims to explore a senior teacher’s feeling and thinking on his ICT learning efforts, forces, pressures, obstacles and its’ consequences for teachers’ learning and development or what we (other teachers) can reflect on his ICT learning experiences. The data are collected through interview and written response. The data show that the teacher is struggling to learn up-dated ICT and adapt to changes. He is trying to go across the border of his comfort zone. However, during his ICT learning process, he is restrained by his own self-constraints, including internal motivation, lack of self-confidence, age, energy and capacity to learn. He also finds obstacles and pressures from his social and physical surroundings. Social comparison, emerging conflict, unsupportive team culture and lack of external motivation are several restrictions of his ICT learning. This indicates that ICT learning needs more than knowledge/cognition on the technical operation, but it involves a broader spectrum of learning: affective, social, situated, self-directed and experiential learning.