Franciscus Xaverius Susilo, Franciscus Xaverius
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ECOLOGICAL DIVERSITY OF SOIL FAUNA AS ECOSYSTEM ENGINEERS IN SMALL-HOLDER COCOA PLANTATION IN SOUTH KONAWE Kilowasid, Laode Muhammad Harjoni; Syamsudin, Tati Suryati; Susilo, Franciscus Xaverius; Sulistyawati, Endah
Journal of Tropical Soils Vol 17, No 2: May 2012
Publisher : UNIVERSITY OF LAMPUNG

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.5400/jts.2012.v17i2.173-180

Abstract

Taxa diversity within soil fauna functional groups can affected ecosystem functioning such as ecosystem engineers,which influence decomposition and nutrient cycling. The objective of this study is to describe ecological diversityvariation within soil fauna as ecosystem engineers in soil ecosystem of cocoa (Theobroma cacao L.) plantation.Sampling was conducted during one year period from five different ages of plantation. Soil fauna removed from soilcore using hand sorting methods. A total of 39 genera of soil fauna as ecosystem engineers were found during thesestudies. Thirty five genera belong to the group of Formicidae (ants), three genera of Isoptera (termites), and onegenera of Oligochaeta (earthworms). Ecological diversity variation within ecosystem engineers was detected withSimpson indices for dominance and evenness. The highest diversity of ecosystem engineers was in the young ageof plantation. This study reinforces the importance biotic interaction which contributed to the distribution andabundance within soil fauna community as ecosystem engineers in small-holder cocoa plantation.[How to Cite: Kilowasid LMH, TS Syamsudin, FX Susilo and E Sulistyawati. 2012. Ecological Diversity of Soil Fauna as Ecosystem Engineers in Small-Holder Cocoa Plantation in South Konawe. J Trop Soils 17 (2): 173-180. doi: 10.5400/jts.2012.17.2.173] [Permalink/DOI: www.dx.doi.org/10.5400/jts.2012.17.2.173]
CHARACTERISTICS OF SOIL FAUNA COMMUNITIES AND HABITAT IN SMALL- HOLDER COCOA PLANTATION IN SOUTH KONAWE Kilowasid, Laode Muhammad Harjoni; Syamsudin, Tati Suryati; Susilo, Franciscus Xaverius; Sulistyawati, Endah; Syaf, Hasbullah
Journal of Tropical Soils Vol 18, No 2: May 2013
Publisher : UNIVERSITY OF LAMPUNG

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.5400/jts.2013.v18i2.149-159

Abstract

The composition of the soil fauna community have played an important role in regulating decomposition and nutrient cycling in agro-ecosystems (include cocoa plantation). Changes in food availability and conditions in the soil habitat can affected the abundance and diversity of soil fauna. This study aimed: (i) to analyze the pattern of changes in soil fauna community composition and characteristic of soil habitat based on the age increasing of cocoa plantation, and (ii) to identify taxa of soil fauna and factors of soil habitat which differentiate among the cocoa plantations. Sampling of soil, roots and soil fauna was conducted from cocoa plantation aged 4, 5, 7, 10, and 16years. Difference in composition of the soil fauna community between ages of the cocoa plantation is significant. Profile of soil habitats was differ significantly between the cocoa plantations, except 5 and 7 years aged. A group of soil fauna has relatively limited in its movement, and sensitively to changes in temperature, soil acidity, and the availability of food and nitrogen are taxa differentiating between soil fauna communities. Soil physic-chemical conditions that affect metabolic activity, movement, and the availability of food for soil fauna is a  distinguishing factor of the characteristics of the soil habitat between different ages of smallholder cocoa plantations.Keywords: Abundance, arthropod, composition, nematodes[How to Cite: Kilowasid LMH, TS Syamsudin, F X Susilo, E Sulistyawati and H Syaf. 2013.Characteristics of Soil Fauna Communities and Habitat in Small-Holder Cocoa Plantation in South Konawe. J Trop Soils 18 (2): 149-159. Doi: 10.5400/jts.2013.18.2.149][Permalink/DOI: www.dx.doi.org/10.5400/jts.2013.18.2.149]REFERENCESAdejuyigbe CO, G Tian and GO Adeoye.1999. Soil microarthropod populations under natural and planted fallows in Southwestern Nigeria. 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PRELIMINARY STUDY ON EUBLEMMA SP. (EUBLEMMINAE): A LEPIDOPTERAN PREDATOR OF COCCUS VIRIDIS (HEMIPTERA: COCCIDAE) ON COFFEE PLANTS IN BANDARLAMPUNG, INDONESIA ., Indriyati; Susilo, Franciscus Xaverius
JURNAL HAMA DAN PENYAKIT TUMBUHAN TROPIKA Vol 15, No 1 (2015): MARET, JURNAL HAMA DAN PENYAKIT TUMBUHAN TROPIKA
Publisher : Universitas Lampung

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (359.745 KB) | DOI: 10.23960/j.hptt.11510-16

Abstract

Preliminary study on Eublemma sp. (Eublemminae): a Lepidopteran predator of Coccus viridis (Hemiptera: Coccidae) on coffee plants in Bandarlampung, Indonesia. The objectives of this study were 1) to identify a Lepidopteran predator of the soft green scale Coccus viridis and 2) to present preliminary data on the predator’s feeding rate. Some coffee leaves where eggs of the Lepidopteran predator have been laid in C. viridis colonies were taken from the field and observed in the laboratory. The predator’s growth and development was noted and the specimens were identified up to generic level based on the caterpillar morphology. Ten coffee leaves each with certain number of C. viridis were also collected from the field, transferred to the laboratory, and each was inoculated with one starved caterpillar that had just formed its protective casing. The number of surviving C. viridis was counted daily. This study reveals that the caterpillar, identified as Eublemma sp. Is found to feed obligately on C. viridis. The predation rate of Eublemma sp. in laboratory is 97 + 11 scales / caterpillar.
THE WHITE-BELLIED PLANTHOPPER (HEMIPTERA: DELPHACIDAE) INFESTING CORN PLANTS IN SOUTH LAMPUNG, INDONESIA Susilo, Franciscus Xaverius; Swibawa, I Gede; ., Indriyati; Hariri, Agus Muhammad; ., Purnomo; Hasibuan, Rosma; Wibowo, Lestari; Suharjo, Radix; Fitriana, Yuyun; Dirmawati, Suskandini Ratih; ., Solikhin; ., Sumardiyono; Rwandini, Ruruh Anjar; Sembodo, Dad Resiworo; ., Suputa
JURNAL HAMA DAN PENYAKIT TUMBUHAN TROPIKA Vol 17, No 1 (2017): MARET, JURNAL HAMA DAN PENYAKIT TUMBUHAN TROPIKA
Publisher : Universitas Lampung

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (427.494 KB) | DOI: 10.23960/j.hptt.11796-103

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The White-Bellied Planthopper (Hemiptera: Delphacidae) Infesting Corn Plants in South Lampung, Indonesia. Corn plants in South Lampung were infested by newly-found delphacid planthoppers. The planthopper specimens were collected from heavily-infested corn fields in Natar area, South Lampung. We identified the specimens as the white-bellied planthopper Stenocranus pacificus Kirkaldy (Hemiptera: Delphacidae), and reported their field population abundance.
CONTRIBUTIONS OF SEED PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL CHARACTERS OF VARIOUS SORGHUM GENOTYPES (SORGHUM BICOLOR [L.] MOENCH.) TO DAMAGED SEED INDUCED BY WEEVIL (SITOPHILUS SP.) DURING STORAGE Pramono, Eko; Kamal, Muhammad; Susilo, Franciscus Xaverius; Timotiwu, Paul Benyamin
JURNAL HAMA DAN PENYAKIT TUMBUHAN TROPIKA Vol 18, No 1 (2018): MARCH, JURNAL HAMA DAN PENYAKIT TUMBUHAN TROPIKA
Publisher : Universitas Lampung

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (262.386 KB) | DOI: 10.23960/j.hptt.11839-50

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Contributions of Seed Physical and Chemical Characters of Various Sorghum Genotypes (Sorghum bicolor [L.] Moench.) to Damaged Seed Induced by Weevil (Sitophilus sp.) During Storage. The percentage of damaged seeds due to feeding by Sitophilus sp. during storage varied among sorghum genotypes (Sorghum bicolor [L.] Moench.). Some researchers reported that the difference was influenced by the physical and chemical characters of the seed grains. This study aimed to determine the contribution of seed physical and chemical characters and their effect model on the percentage of damaged seeds due to weevil attack during storage. Measurement of damaged seeds was carried out on 34 sorghum genotypes after they were stored for four months under storage temperatures of 26 ºC and 18 ºC. Physical characters included seed hardness, weights of a thousand grains, pericarp thickness, and seed volume. Chemical characters of seeds included lipid, protein, carbohydrate, and tannin contents. Results of the study indicate that contribution of physical and chemical characters of sorghum seeds and their effect model on the percentage of damaged seeds due to weevil attack was different among storage under temperature of 26 ºC and under temperatures of  18 ºC.
THE POPULATION OF WHITE-BELLIED PLANTHOPPERS AND THEIR NATURAL ENEMIES: THE NEW PEST OF CORN IN LAMPUNG Swibawa, I Gede; Susilo, Franciscus Xaverius; Hariri, Agus Muhammad; ., Solikhin
JURNAL HAMA DAN PENYAKIT TUMBUHAN TROPIKA Vol 18, No 1 (2018): MARCH, JURNAL HAMA DAN PENYAKIT TUMBUHAN TROPIKA
Publisher : Universitas Lampung

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (629.288 KB) | DOI: 10.23960/j.hptt.11865-74

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The Population of White-Bellied Planthoppers and their Natural Enemies: the New Pest of Corn in Lampung. The white-bellied planthoppers (Stenocranus pasificus), hereinafter referred to as WBP, as new exotic pests in Lampung have the poten-tial to reduce corn production and threaten national food sovereignty. Therefore, population of the pest needs to be managed to prevent the outbreaks. However, there is still limited information on the bio-ecology of WBP. Thus, this research was conducted to: 1) study the population growth pattern of WBP on various corn cultivars and 2) document the natural enemies of WBP. This research was carried out from May to December 2017with a survey method on several corn fields in South Lampung and planting trial on an experimental field of Faculty of Agriculture, Universitas Lampung planted with 3 corn cultivars, i.e. Madura, P-27 and NK which were arranged in randomized complete block design with three replications. The results of the research showed: 1) there were two peaks of population density observed during plant growth. The peak of adult stage of macroptera population density occurred at 17 and 53 days after planting (dap), the highest number of leaves with oviposition mass was observed at 24 and 65 dap, while the peak of population density of nymph stage and adult stage of brachiptera occurred at 31 and 75 dap; 2) Natural enemies of WBP included 9 orders, classified as specialist predators of mirid bugs (Cyrtorhynus) and rove beetles (Paederus), and generalist predators of spiders (Araneae) and lady beetles (Coccinellidae). The population of specialist predators was fluctuated depending on WBP population, while the population of generalist predators was varied.
INFESTATION OF MAJOR PESTS AND DISEASES ON VARIOUS CASSAVA CLONES IN LAMPUNG-INDONESIA Swibawa, I Gede; Susilo, Franciscus Xaverius; ., Purnomo; Aeny, Titik Nur; Utomo, Setyo Dwi; Yuliadi, Erwin
JURNAL HAMA DAN PENYAKIT TUMBUHAN TROPIKA Vol 20, No 1 (2020): MARCH, JURNAL HAMA DAN PENYAKIT TUMBUHAN TROPIKA
Publisher : Universitas Lampung

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.23960/j.hptt.12013-18

Abstract

Infestation of major pests and diseases on various cassava clones in Lampung-Indonesia. Lampung Province is one ofcassava producers in Indonesia which contributes more than 30% to the total national cassava production. However, theinfestation of pests and diseases can limit cassava production in the field. The objective of this research was to observe theinfestation level of major plant pests and diseases of cassava in Lampung. A survey was conducted in August 2016 in severallocations of cassava fields owned by farmers and experimental plots in the area of Faculty of Agriculture, University ofLampung. The results showed that cassava mealybug (Phenacoccus manihoti), papaya mealybug (Paracoccus marginatus)and red mite (Tetranychus urticae) infested at cassava clones in Lampung. The infestation of red mite tended to be higher thanthat of mealybugs. The cassava brown leaf spot disease that infested in mild to moderate severity was found on all cassavaclones, while viral disease with prevalence of 78% was only found on Duwet 1 clone in experimental plot.