Viramitha Kusnandi Rusmil, Viramitha Kusnandi
Unknown Affiliation

Published : 8 Documents
Articles

Found 3 Documents
Search
Journal : Althea Medical Journal

Factors Influencing Outcomes of Children Hospitalized with Acute Severe Malnutrition Rusmil, Viramitha Kusnandi; Wiramihardja, Siska; AP, Adhitya; Gurnida, Dida A
Althea Medical Journal Vol 5, No 2 (2018)
Publisher : Althea Medical Journal

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (57.903 KB)

Abstract

Background: Nutrition is still a global health issue, and improving nutrition is among the targets of the Sustainable Developmental Goals (SDGs). One of Indonesia’s SDGs indicators is to reduce prevalence of malnutrition in children. Indonesia, as a developing country, implements a comprehensive malnutrition treatment program for children, including various aspects related to management of children with acute malnutrition. The purpose of this study was to identify factors associated with the outcome of children hospitalized with acute severe malnutrition. Methods: This cross sectional study enrolled 195 children with severe acute malnutrition, admitted to hospital from November 2016 to August 2017. Statistical Analysis was conducted using multivariable logistic regression to identify factors associated with the outcome. Adjusted Ratio with Confident Interval 95% and the value of P <0 .05 was considered significant. Result: A total of 195 children were diagnosed havings acute severe malnutrition. A history of complete immunization status (p value <0.001) was proved to be directly proportional to the recovery rate of patients with acute severe malnutrition. Provision of other types of antibiotic (p value 0.001) showed to increase recovery rates of patients with acute severe malnutrition. Several comorbid diseases reduced recovery rates such as pneumonia (Crude OR 0.619) tuberculosis (Crude OR 0.606) and HIV (p value 0.08).Conclusions: This study shows that although the provided treatments are appropriate with the standard treatment for severe malnutrition, they still encounter high levels of morbidity. Further large-scale studies should be conducted to develop better interventions and management of acute severe malnutrition, in order to achieve better outcome. 
Exclusive and Non-Exclusive Breastfeeding among Stunted and Normal 6–9 Month-Old-Children in Jatinangor Subdistrict, Indonesia Rusmil, Viramitha Kusnandi; Prahastuti, Tri Oktaviani; Luftimas, Dimas Erlangga; Hafsah, Tisnasari
Althea Medical Journal Vol 6, No 1 (2019)
Publisher : Althea Medical Journal

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (524.879 KB) | DOI: 10.15850/amj.v6n1.1598

Abstract

Background: Stunting has become a public health problem in Indonesia, with the prevalence of stunting is 37.2% nationally and 25.6% in West Java. One of the causes of stunting is malnutrition that may occur because of not giving exclusive breastfeeding on the first 1000 days of life (FDL). The purpose of this study was to determine whether there was difference between exclusive and non-exclusive breastfeeding among stunted and normal 6–9 month-old-children. Methods: This study was conducted using a cross-sectional analytic study during August-October 2018 with consecutive sampling method. This study involved 110 pairs of mothers and children aged 6-9 months who resided in villages which were within the work area of Jatinangor Public Health Center. Nutritional status was determined based on length-for-age z score according to WHO. The type of breastfeeding was known based on the questionnaire. Data was analyzed by chi square test. Result: There were 60 of 110 children (54.5%) who did not receive exclusive breastfeeding. The incidence of stunting in children was 12.7% (14 of 110), of whom 10 children had no exclusive breastfeeding (p>0.05).Conclusions: Although the incidence of stunting is higher in non-exclusive breastfeeding group, there is no difference in the proportion of stunting in children aged 6–9 months between those who are exclusively breastfed and those who are not, however, exclusive breastfeeding is encouraged.
Factors Influencing Outcomes of Children Hospitalized with Acute Severe Malnutrition Rusmil, Viramitha Kusnandi; Wiramihardja, Siska; AP, Adhitya; Gurnida, Dida A
Althea Medical Journal Vol 5, No 2 (2018)
Publisher : Althea Medical Journal

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (57.903 KB) | DOI: 10.15850/amj.v5n2.1246

Abstract

Background: Nutrition is still a global health issue, and improving nutrition is among the targets of the Sustainable Developmental Goals (SDGs). One of Indonesia’s SDGs indicators is to reduce prevalence of malnutrition in children. Indonesia, as a developing country, implements a comprehensive malnutrition treatment program for children, including various aspects related to management of children with acute malnutrition. The purpose of this study was to identify factors associated with the outcome of children hospitalized with acute severe malnutrition. Methods: This cross sectional study enrolled 195 children with severe acute malnutrition, admitted to hospital from November 2016 to August 2017. Statistical Analysis was conducted using multivariable logistic regression to identify factors associated with the outcome. Adjusted Ratio with Confident Interval 95% and the value of P <0 .05 was considered significant. Result: A total of 195 children were diagnosed havings acute severe malnutrition. A history of complete immunization status (p value <0.001) was proved to be directly proportional to the recovery rate of patients with acute severe malnutrition. Provision of other types of antibiotic (p value 0.001) showed to increase recovery rates of patients with acute severe malnutrition. Several comorbid diseases reduced recovery rates such as pneumonia (Crude OR 0.619) tuberculosis (Crude OR 0.606) and HIV (p value 0.08).Conclusions: This study shows that although the provided treatments are appropriate with the standard treatment for severe malnutrition, they still encounter high levels of morbidity. Further large-scale studies should be conducted to develop better interventions and management of acute severe malnutrition, in order to achieve better outcome.