Ni Wayan Tirthaningsih, Ni Wayan
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EFFECTS OF SAMBILOTO ETHANOL EXTRACT ON FATTY LIVER, SGOT/SGPT LEVELS AND LIPID PROFILE OF WISTAR STRAIN WHITE RAT (RATTUS NORVEGICUS) EXPOSED TO HIGH-FAT DIET Jong, FX Himawan Haryanto; Gunawan, Ari; Santoso, Mochamad Wirono Aman; Anjani, Susilowati; Tirthaningsih, Ni Wayan; Basori, Ahmad
Folia Medica Indonesiana Vol 54, No 2 (2018): June
Publisher : Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Airlangga

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20473/fmi.v54i2.8856

Abstract

The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of ethanol extract of sambiloto (Andrographis paniculata) on fatty liver percentage, serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (SGOT) level and lipid profile of wistar strain white rat exposed to high fat diet. The study used randomized post test only control group design. Total sample was 50 male wistar strain rats (Rattus norvegicus) divided randomly into 5 groups (randomization). The normality test used was Kolmogorov Smirnov test (a=0.05). The homogeneity test used was Levene test (a=0.05). The comparative test was done using Anova test (analysis of variance) (a=0.05) or Brown-Forsythe test (a=0.05). The correlation test was done using Pearson test (a=0.05). The administration of sambiloto ethanol extract with doses of 100, 200 and 400 milligrams (mg)/kilogram (kg) body weight (BW) decreased the percentage of fatty liver (r=-0.950), SGOT (r=-0.964)/SGPT (r=(R=-0.973)/LDL (low-density lipoprotein) (r=-0.960) and increased HDL (high-density lipoprotein) levels (r=-0.923)=0.956) in white rats exposed to a high-fat diet. In conclusion, increased dose of ethanol extract of sambiloto can decrease the percentage of fatty liver, SGOT/SGPT and total cholesterol/TG/LDL and increase HDL level of white rats exposed to high fat diet.
Management of Lowe syndrome: a case report Prasetyo, Risky Vitria; Setiawan, Heru; Soemyarso, Ninik Asmaningsih; Noer, Mohammad Sjaifullah; Irwanto, Irwanto; Gunawan, Prastiya Indra; Loebis, Rozalina; Utomo, Sri Andreani; Tirthaningsih, Ni Wayan
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 55 No 3 (2015): May 2015
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (2093.872 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi55.3.2015.176-84

Abstract

Lowe syndrome (the oculocerebrorenal syndrome of Lowe, OCRL) is a multisystem disorder characterized by anomalies affecting the eyes, nervous system and kidneys.1-3 The disorder was first recognized by Lowe et al. in 1952, and described as a unique syndrome with organic aciduria, decreased renal ammonia production, hydrophthalmos, and mental retardation. In 1954, renal Fanconi syndrome was recognized as being associated with Lowe syndrome and in 1965, a recessive X-linked pattern of inheritance was determined.2,4 Lowe syndrome is a very rare disease, with an estimated prevalence in the general population of 1 in 500,000. According to the Lowe Syndrome Association (LSA) in the USA, the estimated prevalence is between 1 and 10 affected males in 1,000,000 people, with 190 living in the year 2000. The Italian Association of Lowe Syndrome estimated that there were 34 Lowe syndrome patients (33 boys and one girl) living in Italy in the year 2005.2,4,5 It almost exclusively affects males.6 Physicians may not be familiar with Lowe syndrome due to its rarity.4