Indah S Widyahening, Indah S
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Comparison of Students’ Characteristics, Self-Motivation, and Readiness of Self-Directed Learning Implementation among Medical Students at Maranatha Christian University Gunanegara, Rimonta F; Wahid, Mardiastuti H; Widyahening, Indah S
Journal of Medicine and Health Vol 1, No 5 (2017)
Publisher : Maranatha Christian University

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Abstract

Self-Directed Learning (SDL) is an important skill that must be achieved by medical students.The aim of this study is to identify the level of self-motivation and SDL readiness in the medicalstudents as well as to identify factors affecting SDL. This is is a mixed method research,involving first-year and clinical year medical students. A quantitative research is conducted bydistributing self-motivation (MSLQ) and SDL questionnaire (SDLRS). A total sampling isapplied to select the respondents. Furthermore, focus group discussion (FGD) on students andtutors/preceptors is carried out. Informants are chosen by purposive sampling method. Thisresearch reveals that most of medical students have a good level of self-motivation but a lowlevel of SDL readiness. Nevertheless, the mean scores of SDL readiness in both groups showsno significant differences. The research also identifies four major factors affecting the SDLreadiness, namely the students’ characteristics, learning process, the role of tutors/preceptorsand supporting facilities for learning. There is no significant difference between SDL readinessof the first-year and clinical year of medical students. Unprepared students’ characteristics,sub-optimal learning process, unsupported role of tutors/preceptors and inadequate learningresources are found to be the mayor factors influencing SDL readiness.Keywords: self-directed learning readiness; self-motivation; problem-based learning
Comparison of Students’ Characteristics, Self-Motivation, and Readiness of Self-Directed Learning Implementation among Medical Students at Maranatha Christian University Gunanegara, Rimonta F; Wahid, Mardiastuti H; Widyahening, Indah S
Journal of Medicine & Health Vol 1 No 5 (2017)
Publisher : Universitas Kristen Maranatha

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (598.99 KB) | DOI: 10.28932/jmh.v1i5.541

Abstract

Self-Directed Learning (SDL) is an important skill that must be achieved by medical students.The aim of this study is to identify the level of self-motivation and SDL readiness in the medicalstudents as well as to identify factors affecting SDL. This is is a mixed method research,involving first-year and clinical year medical students. A quantitative research is conducted bydistributing self-motivation (MSLQ) and SDL questionnaire (SDLRS). A total sampling isapplied to select the respondents. Furthermore, focus group discussion (FGD) on students andtutors/preceptors is carried out. Informants are chosen by purposive sampling method. Thisresearch reveals that most of medical students have a good level of self-motivation but a lowlevel of SDL readiness. Nevertheless, the mean scores of SDL readiness in both groups showsno significant differences. The research also identifies four major factors affecting the SDLreadiness, namely the students’ characteristics, learning process, the role of tutors/preceptorsand supporting facilities for learning. There is no significant difference between SDL readinessof the first-year and clinical year of medical students. Unprepared students’ characteristics,sub-optimal learning process, unsupported role of tutors/preceptors and inadequate learningresources are found to be the mayor factors influencing SDL readiness.Keywords: self-directed learning readiness; self-motivation; problem-based learning
The Role of Primary Health Care in the Prevention of Noncommunicable Diseases Widyahening, Indah S
Review of Primary Care Practice and Education (Kajian Praktik dan Pendidikan Layanan Primer) Vol 2, No 1 (2019): January
Publisher : Faculty of Medicine, Public Health, and Nursing

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (336.84 KB) | DOI: 10.22146/rpcpe.44464

Abstract

Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) currently cause more deaths than all other causes combined.  Cardiovascular diseases, cancer, chronic respiratory diseases and diabetes are the four major NCDs that are responsible for 82% of NCD deaths. Approximately 42% of all NCD deaths globally occurred before the age of 70 years; 48% of NCD deaths in the low- and middle-income countries and 28% in high-income countries were in individuals aged under 70 years.(1) Because of its chronic nature and the complications that arisen, NCDs bring devastating social, economic and public health impact.  The management of its various long-term complications accompanied by the typical existence of multimorbidity will give rise to an increased complexity of care in the future. Aging, improved medical therapies, demographic transition, life-style changes, globalization and urbanization are factors that are contributing to the increased prevalence, severity and complexity of NCDs.........