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Paediatrica Indonesiana
ISSN : 00309311     EISSN : 2338476X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
Paediatrica Indonesiana is a medical journal devoted to the health, in a broad sense, affecting fetuses, infants, children, and adolescents, belonged to the Indonesian Pediatric Society. Its publications are directed to pediatricians and other medical practitioners or researchers at all levels of health practice throughout the world.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 7 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 33 No 7-8 (1993): July 1993" : 7 Documents clear
Antimicrobial Resistance of Nosocomial Infections in Children Garna, Herry
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 33 No 7-8 (1993): July 1993
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (747.066 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi33.7-8.1993.133-41

Abstract

A 9 month prospective study , from August 1988 to April 1989, was performed at the Department of Child Health, Medical School, Padjadjaran University, Hasan Sadikin Hospital Bandung. The aim of the study was to identify the pattern of sensitivity of bacteria causing nosocomial infections. It was revealed that among 4328 hospitalized pediatric patients, a total number of 342 patients had one or more nosocomial infections, yielding 411 episodes. Twenty-five per cent of isolated S. aureus was resistant to either ampicillin or oxacyllin. Higher percentages of resistance were observed in S. albus, i.e., to penicillin (53.3%) and oxacyllin (46.7%), and to cefuroxime, erythromycin and clindamycin (each in 40.0% of isolate). E. coli was In 86.3% resistant-to ampicillin, 78.4% to chloramphenicol (and thiamphenicol), 56.8% to tobramycin and 48.2% to gentamicin. The isolated Salmonella sp was almost 100% resistant to ampicillin and chloramphenicol (and thiamphenicol) but was highly sensitive to amikacin, cefotaxime and netilmicin, arround 100%. Pseudomonas sp was 92.9% resistant to ampicillin, 85.7% to chloramphenicol (and thiamphenicol) and 78.6% to cefuroxime; on the contrary it was 92.9% sensitive to amikacin. It can be concluded that gram-negative microorganisms were in general showed highly resistant to ampicillin, chloramphenicol (and thiamphenicol), tobramycin, and gentamicin; on the other hand more than 90% were sensitive to netilmicin, cefotaxime and amikacin.
Hospital Stay in Nosocomial Infections Garna, Herry
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 33 No 7-8 (1993): July 1993
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (480.395 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi33.7-8.1993.142-9

Abstract

A 9 month prospective study on nosocomial infections was held from August 1988 till April 1989 at the Department of Child Health, Medical School, Padjadjaran University, Hasan Sadikin Hospital Bandung. The purpose of the study was to compare the duration of hospitalization in patients with and without nosocomial infections. The Department of Child Health has 4 main wards, A2 (for low sosioeconomic families), A3 (for middle and high socioeconomic families), R-17 (for neonates) anda NICU. There were 4328 hospitalized pediatrica patients observed consisting of 293 children (29 9%) in A2, 485 (11.2%) in A3, 2487 (57.5%) in R-17, and 41 episodes in NICU, showing rates of 9.9% in A2, 4.5% in A3, 8.8% in R-17 and 65.1% in NICU. The means hospital stay of patients with nosocomial infecitons were 26.77 and 22.44 days in A2 and NICU, while in A3 and R-17 17.61 and 6.75 days. The means hospital stay of patients without nosocomial infecitons were 13.11 and 9.24 days in A2 and NICU, and 1 0.48 and 3.10 days In A3 and R-1 7. Length of stay specific nosocomial infeciton rate rose with the duration of hospitalization, with 3 2% of patients staying upt to 6 days, 16.7% of patients staying 7-13 days, 19.7% of patients staying 14 to 20 days, and 48,8% of patients staying 35 days or more. It can be concluded that the longer the length of stay, the higher the number of nosocomial infections. The overall mean hospital stay of patients with nosocomial infection was 2.4 times higher than that without nosocomial infection.
Diagnostic Accuracy of CRP (C-Reactive Protein) Examination in Neonatal Infections Kosim, M. Sholeh; Arhana, Bagus Ngurah Putu; Mangunsong, Harry
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 33 No 7-8 (1993): July 1993
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (706.215 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi33.7-8.1993.150-8

Abstract

The incidence of neonatal infections has been still high in Indonesia. The main factors influencing success of treatment are early clinical diagnosis and rapid determination of the etiologic microorganisms. C-reactive protein (CRP) could be measured in the serum of baby suffering from bacterial infections. The aim of this study was to compare the capability of CRP examination in determining the diagnosis of neonatal infections, using blood culture examination as the gold standard. For comparison, white blood cell (WBC) and platelet counts, which have been used as indicators of neonatal infections, were also evaluated. This study was done prospectively on 30 cases with suspected neonatal infections admitted to the High Risk Baby Ward, Division of Perinatology, and 30 normal babies as control, during the period of April to December 1990. CRP examination was done by latex agglutination method. The results of this study revealed that CRP examination has good sensitivity, specificity. and predictive values. CRP was also proved to be superior to WBC and platelet counts. CRP examination was also easy to perform, cheaper, and faster than blood culture examination. It is concluded that CRP examination could be used as the confirmatory tool in the diagnosis of neonatal bacterial infections.
A Clinico-Pathological Correlation of Childhood Primary Nephrotic Syndrome in Jakarta Wirya, I. G. N. Wila
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 33 No 7-8 (1993): July 1993
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (706.215 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi33.7-8.1993.150-8

Abstract

Three hundred and sixty-four out of 547 children with primary nephrotic syndrome (PNS) treated at the Department of Child Health, Medical School, University of Indonesia between January 1970 and December 1979, were biopsied. The clinical, laboratory, and pathological characteristics of these patients were evaluated and compared with those reported by the International Study of Kidney Disease in Children (ISKOC, 1978) comprising children of Western countries with PNS. Results of this study showed that the spectrum of the histopathological changes in the 2 study populations was slightly different. Clinical and laboratory characteristics of certain types of PNS also showed some differences compared with those of ISKDC report. Patients with non-minimal changes nephrotic syndrome (NMCNS) were more frequently found in this study, and they were older than those of ISKDC report, i.e., more children < 6 years of age were affected with this disease in Jakarta. Similarly, this study showed that patients with minimal changes nephrotic syndrome (MCNS) were older than those of ISKDC report; the peak age of Western patients was less than 6 years. Patients with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN) reported by ISKDC were more severe than those of this study as far as clinical and laboratory characteristics were concerned. The causes of these clinical and histopathological discrepancies between the two studies need to be further elucidated.
Patterns of Acid Base Balance and Plasma Electrolyte Concentrations in Post Surgical Digestive Patients El Fuad, T. Murad; Gea, Efori; Yael, Chaerul; Lubis, Munar
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 33 No 7-8 (1993): July 1993
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (315.268 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi33.7-8.1993.173-81

Abstract

Patterns of acid-base balance and plasma electrolyte concentrations of postsurgical digestive patients were studied retrospectively. The patients were treated at the Pediatric ICU Dr. Pirngadi Hospital, Medan, during the period of February 1991 through January 31 1992. There were 131 patients admitted to the Pediatric ICU, 67 (51.1 %) of them had had gastrointestinal surgery. Arterial blood gas and I or plasma electrolyte examinations were done in 92% of patients within 12 hours of admission. In 50 patients both blood gas and electrolyte concentration values were examined; 6 of them died. One out of 14 patients who had only serum electrolyte concentration values died. One out of 3 patients who had neither blood gas nor plasma electrolyte concentration values died. Acid-base imbalances were found in 66% of those 50 patients, consisting of 28% metabolic acidosis, 12% respiratory alkalosis, 8% respiratory acidosis, and 6% metabolic alkalosis. Hyponatremia was found in 68.4% of the survivors and in 2 out of 6 patients who died. No hypernatremia was found in any of the patients. Hypokalemia was found in 24.6% of patients survived; and none in those who died. Hyperkalemia was encountered in 24.6% of those who survived. The overall mortality of patients who had undergone gastrointestinal surgery in the Pediatric ICU, Pirngadi Hospital, was 8/67 (11.9%).
Conjunctival Mycobacteriosis Rahajoe, Nastiti N.; Setyanto, Darmawan B.; Rhum, Muhammad; Usman, Tetty A.
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 33 No 7-8 (1993): July 1993
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (693.712 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi33.7-8.1993.182-90

Abstract

A 6 1/2- year old Indonesian girl with 30 kg of body weight was consulted to the Department of Child Health, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital - Medical School University of Indonesia , Jakarta, for eye, surgery tolerance. At 3 1/2 years old, she came for the first time with a granulomatous tumor on her left eye. Excision was done, and histopathologic examination revealed granulation tissue corresponding to tuberculosis. The patient was referred to the Department of Child Health for further exploration. Sensitin test was positive for Mycobacterium intracellulare, not for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The tumor reappeared twice and the last histopathologic examination revealed nonspecific granulation tissue.
Prenatal Diagnosis of Thalassemia Sunarto, Sunarto
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 33 No 7-8 (1993): July 1993
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (642.183 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi33.7-8.1993.191-9

Abstract

Thalassemia is an individual as well as a community health problem in some countries. It causes a lifelong suffering for the affected individuals. There is no treatment other than supportive, i.e. regular transfusions and removal of iron overload from the body. Only by such continuous and expensive treatment thalassemic patients can-generally achieve nearly normal health, but the health burden of such therapy for a large number of thalassemic patients is unaffordable by the affected communities. Prevention of the births of thalassemic babies is the choice for controlling the thalassemia and has been successful in many countries. For this purpose reliable and time accurate prenatal diagnosis is a conditio sine qua non. Blood fetal sampling is safe and can be done after 16 weeks gestation, amniocentesis after 14 weeks, and even chorionic villi sampling as early as 8 weeks gestation. In vitro globin synthesis analysis applied to the fetal blood sample is very reliable to measure the rate of synthesis of the globin chains that make up the hemoglobin. The-DNA analysis of the fibroblasts obtained by amniocentesis or of the chorionic villus sample is very sensitive and specific for the diagnosis of the genetic disorder in thalassemias. By involving the prenatal diagnosis, the birth of B-homozygous thalassemia has decreased by up to 90%.

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