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Paediatrica Indonesiana
ISSN : 00309311     EISSN : 2338476X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
Paediatrica Indonesiana is a medical journal devoted to the health, in a broad sense, affecting fetuses, infants, children, and adolescents, belonged to the Indonesian Pediatric Society. Its publications are directed to pediatricians and other medical practitioners or researchers at all levels of health practice throughout the world.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 8 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 43 No 1 (2003): January 2003" : 8 Documents clear
Study of blood pressure in elementary school children at hill and seashore areas Ariani, Ani; Lisma, T Erna; Lubis, Iskandar Z; Ramayati, Rafita; Rusdidjas, Rusdidjas
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 43 No 1 (2003): January 2003
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (253.931 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi43.1.2003.6-9

Abstract

Background Measurement of blood pressure is the most impor-tant tool for early detection of hypertension. There is an assump-tion that salt consumption of the population living at the seashoreis higher than that of those living on the hill area, and it would leadto higher blood pressure.Objective To find out whether there is any difference of bloodpressure between school-age children (6-13 years) living on thehill area (Brastagi subdistrict) and those living at the seashore area(Pantai Cermin sub district), North Sumatra.Methods A cross sectional study was conducted in Brastagi andPantai Cermin from September to October 1995. The subjects weretaken by a simple random sampling method. The blood pressurewas measured based on recommendation of The Second TaskForce on Blood Pressure Control in Children 1987.Results The means systolic pressure in boys of 6 years of age aswell as in girls of 6,8,12 and 13 years, and the means of diastolicpressure in girls of 6,7,8,11 years were higher in Pantai Cermin(p<0.05). Blood pressure had significant positive correlations(p<0.001) with age, weight and height in both areas. Overall, hy-pertension was found in 117 (11%) out of 1065 children, 11.6%among girls and 10.6% among boys. On the hill and at seashorearea, hypertension was found in 10.2% and 11.8% of children re-spectively, which was not statistically different (p>0.05).Conclusion In children, there was no significant difference be-tween the prevalence of hypertension on hill and seashore area
Pattern of newborn babies delivered by cesarean section Tjipta, Guslihan D; Nasution, Riza I; Aldy, Dachrul; Siregar, Zakaria
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 43 No 1 (2003): January 2003
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (275.151 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi43.1.2003.20-3

Abstract

Background The birth rate in Indonesia is still high and abnormallabor constitutes 15% of all deliveries which needs cesarean sec-tion as a solution for complicated cases.Objectives To find the general physical condition of babies bornafter cesarean section as well as the characteristics of motherswho underwent cesarean section.Methods A retrospective study on newborn babies delivered bycesarean section conducted in Subdivision of Neonatology, Medi-cal School, University of North Sumatera-Pirngadi Hospital Medan,in period of 2 years (1991-1992).Results There were 8762 babies born during the study period,1484 babies (16.93%) delivered by cesarean section due to pla-centa previa (26.2%), prolonged labor (15.8%), cephalopelvic dis-proportion (10.3%), neglected labor (9.9%), eclampsia/preeclamp-sia (8.1%), fetal distress (7.5%), previous section (6.6%), breechpresentation (5.7%), solutio placenta (4.0%), and others (5.9%). Itwas shown that mothers undergoing caesarean section was mainly20-30 years old (66.4%), multigravida (47.8%), term gestationalage (79.4%), and minimal antenatal care (61.3%). There were 1224(82.5%) babies with birth weight >2500 grams and 894 (60.2%)suffered from asphyxia.Conclusions The evidence of asphyxia by cesarean section andlow birth weight group was significantly different from those nor-mally delivered (p<0.001). The mortality rate was 11.5% due tostill birth 29.2%, RDS 18.3%, sepsis 15.5%, pneumonia 12.3%,and gastroenteritis 11.5%
Airway reversibility in newly developed asthma in children Harsono, Ariyanto; Kusumawardani, Sri; MS, Makmuri; Santosa, Gunadi
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 43 No 1 (2003): January 2003
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (321.312 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi43.1.2003.1-5

Abstract

Objective To determine factors influencing forced expiratory vol-ume in one second (FEV 1 ) reversibility in newly developed asthmain childrenMethods A cross sectional study was done on 52 patients aged 6-14 years who were recruited from a longitudinal study of 161 newlydeveloped asthmatic children. Pre and post-bronchodilator FEV 1were obtained to calculate the reversibility. Seven patients had toperform peak expiratory volume (PEV) variability before recruited.Some variables including sex, age, height, onset of asthma, fre-quency of asthma attacks at the time of the test were analyzed toevaluate their roles in the outcome of FEV 1 reversibility using pairedsample t-test, Pearson’s correlation coefficient, and multi regres-sion analysis.Results Mean pre- and post-bronchodilator FEV 1 were 1.14 (SD0.24) and 1.31 (SD 0.28), respectively. FEV 1 reversibility rangedbetween 6%-36%. Bivariate analyses demonstrated significant cor-relation between either cough (p=0.031) or symptom-free (p=0.041)and the airway reversibility. Multivariate analysis showed that coughwas an important factor influencing airway reversibility (p=0.0246).Conclusion Cough is an important influencing factor of the air-way reversibility
Peak expiratory flow rate of primary school children in high and low air pollution level areas Hasibuan, Ismart Edy; Supriatmo, M Nur; Faisal, A; Panggabean, Gabriel; Daulay, Ridwan M; Siregar, Zakaria; Lubis, Helmi M
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 43 No 1 (2003): January 2003
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (271.248 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi43.1.2003.10-13

Abstract

Background Chronic inhalation of air pollutants may causebronchoconstriction, bronchiolitis, and edema of airway, thus alterlung volume. To measure the lung volume, a simple lung functiontest, the peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR), can provide a feature oflung volume in liters/minute.Objective The purpose of this study was to measure PEFR val-ues of primary school children in a high air pollution level area(Medan) and compare the results with the PEFR values of those ina low air pollution level area (Tebing Tinggi).Methods A cross sectional study was conducted on primary schoolchildren (10-12 years of age) during May-July 2000 in Medan andTebing Tinggi. Data were obtained by questionnaires. Physical ex-amination included age, sex, height, weight, and PEFR value. PEFRvalues were measured by Mini Wright peak expiratory flow meter(MPFM) from three blows. The highest volume was taken as thePEFR value. Statistical analysis was done by t-test and p<0.05was considered significant.Results There were 212 primary school children eligible for thisstudy; 107 came from the high air pollution level area and 105from the low air pollution level area. The PEFR values did not dif-fer significantly between the two groups (p>0.05)Conclusion PEFR values in a high air population level area werenot statistically different compared with those in low air pollutionlevel area
Characteristics and prognostic factors of intracranial hemorrhage in children Kardana, Made; Kari, Komang; Widia, Made
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 43 No 1 (2003): January 2003
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (346.976 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi43.1.2003.14-9

Abstract

Objective Finding the characteristics and risk factors associatedwith prognosis in children suffering from intracranial hemorrhage.Methods This was a retrospective medical record review of chil-dren (older than 1 month old) admitted with intracranial hemor-rhage to the Department of Child Health the Sanglah Hospital,Denpasar, during the period of January 1998 to December 2000.Prognostic factors were identified by chi-square and multivariateanalysis with significance of p<0.05Results There were 56 patients eligible for the study. Among themwere 35 (63%) males and 21 (27%) females. Forty-three (77%)were less than one year of age, 40 (71%) without history of traumaand the major clinical manifestation was paleness (89%). The mostcommon location was subdural bleeding, 21 patients (38%). Fac-tors associated with prognosis was the bleeding location (p<0.05)Conclusions Intracranial hemorrhage was more common in malesand in infants. The most common clinical manifestation was pale-ness. Bleeding location was associated with prognosis
The correlation between ferritin level and cardiac dysfunction in patients with thalassemia Subroto, Fajar; Munthe, Bulan Ginting; Advani, Najib; Firmansyah, Agus
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 43 No 1 (2003): January 2003
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (286.98 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi43.1.2003.24-7

Abstract

Background Patients with b-thalassemia major, long-term trans-fusion, extravasal hemolytic, and increased intestinal absorptionof iron result in systemic iron overload, which may accumulate inmyocardium causing cardiac dysfunctions. Congestive heart fail-ure usually develops in adolescence or early adult years, and pa-tient usually dies within 1 year after the onset of symptoms. There-fore, it is important to detect early signs of cardiac dysfunction inpatient with thalassemia.Objective This study aimed to assess the correlation betweenferritin level and cardiac dysfunction in patients with thalassemia.Methods A cross sectional study was conducted on 62 b-thalas-semic patients (34 males and 28 females) with age ranging from3.5 to 23 years. They received 3,150 – 94,985 mL of blood; withthe serum ferritin level of 812.2 – 12,175 ng/mL. Each patient un-derwent laboratory examinations and clinical cardiac evaluationwith ECG and echocardiography.Results Cumulative blood transfusions correlated well with theserum ferritin values (p=0.001). The serum ferritin level did notshow correlation with deferoxamine (DFO) treatment. ECG exami-nation revealed 5 patients (8.1%) with dysrhythmia, LVH, and heartblock grade II and I. Echocardiography examination showed 18patients (29%) with systolic or diastolic dysfunction. There was nocorrelation between the serum ferritin level and cardiac dysfunc-tions (p=0.640). The serum ferritin prediction value against car-diac dysfunctions could not be established.Conclusion There was no correlation between serum ferritin lev-els with cardiac dysfunctions. In detecting cardiac dysfunctions inthalassemic patients, echocardiography was more sensitive thanECG
Brainstem auditory evoked potentials in children with microcephaly Mangunatmadja, Irawan; Widodo, Dwi Putro; Pusponegoro, Hardiono D
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 43 No 1 (2003): January 2003
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (230.801 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi43.1.2003.28-30

Abstract

Background Hearing loss (HL) is commonly found in childrenwith microcephaly. The aim of this study was to reveal hearing lossand auditory brainstem pathways disorders in children with micro-cephaly and other handicaps.Methods There were 194 children who were referred for hearingevaluation. Subjects with history of congenital perinatal infection(TORCH) were excluded. Data were collected from the results ofBrainstem Auditory Evoked Potentials (BAEP) recordings, includ-ing sex, age, clinical manifestations, latency and interlatency be-tween waves I, III, V, and the hearing levels of each ear.Results Moderate to profound HL were found in fourteen ears(58%) of patients with microcephaly. Moderate to profound HL (28%)and endocochlear damage (15%) were found in the ears of pa-tients with microcephaly and delayed speech. Moderate to pro-found HL (39%) and endocochlear damage (11%) were detectedin the ears of patients with microcephaly and delayed develop-ment. Moderate to profound HL (21%) and endocochlear damage(16%) were found in the ears of microcephalic patients with bothdelayed speech and delayed development. Moderate to profoundHL (26%) and endocochlear damage (32%) were detected in theears of patients with microcephaly and cerebral palsy.Conclusion This study revealed the importance of early HL de-tection in microcephalic patients especially those with other handi-caps such as delayed speech, delayed development, and cere-bral palsy
Congenital hypothyroidism: a case report Maswiryati, Anak A; Westra, Nyoman
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 43 No 1 (2003): January 2003
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (223.016 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi43.1.2003.31-4

Abstract

Hypothyroidism resulted from deficiency ofthyroid hormone production due to adefect in thyroid gland. The disorder maybe manifested earlier. When symptomsoccur after a period of normal function of thyroid gland,the disorder may be either truly “acquired” or onlyappear as a variety of congenital defects in which themanifestation of the deficiency is delayed. Normal levelof triiodothyronine (T3) in children is 100-260 ng/dl,thyroxin (T4) 7.3 - 15 mg/dl and thyroid-stimulatinghormone (TSH) 2-10 mU/mL. 1,2 The age at whichsymptoms appear depends on the impairment degreeof thyroid function. In many cases, the deficiency ofthyroid hormone is severe, and symptoms tend todevelop in the early weeks of life. 1,3 The prevalence ofcongenital hypothyroidism has been found to be 1 in4,000 infants world wide; it is lower in Japan (1 in 5,500infants) and in African American population (1 in32,000 infants). Most infants with congenitalhypothyroidism are asymptomatic at birth, even whenthere is a complete agenesis of the thyroid gland. 1,3 Butin other cases, during the first few months of life, thesymptoms of hypothyroidism such as feeding problems,failure to thrive, constipation, hoarse cry, andsomnolence usually can be found. 1,3,4 The purpose ofthis study is to report a case of congenital hypothyroidismin a 14 months old child.

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