cover
Contact Name
-
Contact Email
-
Phone
-
Journal Mail Official
-
Editorial Address
-
Location
Kota semarang,
Jawa tengah
INDONESIA
Paediatrica Indonesiana
ISSN : 00309311     EISSN : 2338476X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
Paediatrica Indonesiana is a medical journal devoted to the health, in a broad sense, affecting fetuses, infants, children, and adolescents, belonged to the Indonesian Pediatric Society. Its publications are directed to pediatricians and other medical practitioners or researchers at all levels of health practice throughout the world.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 8 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 43 No 2 (2003): March 2003" : 8 Documents clear
Thyroxine and thyroid stimulating hormone levels in under-five severe malnourished children Tamzil, Shelvi H.; Fadil, Ryadi; Rustama, Diet S.; Nataprawira, Melinda D.
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 43 No 2 (2003): March 2003
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi43.2.2003.42-5

Abstract

Background In Indonesia, protein energy malnutrition (PEM) inchildren is still a health problem. Malnourished children will havegrowth and development disruption, which is not only caused bynutritional factor, but might be associated with endocrine system,such as thyroid hormone metabolism. Hypothyroidism or thyroidhypofunction could be happened in malnourished children.Objective The purpose of this study was to assess thyroxine (T4)and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels in under-five severemalnourished children.Methods This was a descriptive study with cross sectional design.Subjects were all under-five severe malnourished childrenbased on nutritional evaluation in August 2001 done by local healthcare workers in Andir District, Bandung. Severe malnutrition wasdefined as weight for age less than -3SD (W/A <-3SD).Results There were 42 subjects who fulfilled inclusion criteria, aged11-57 months, five of them showed clinical manifestation of marasmus.The T4 levels of the 41 subjects were still in normal limitsand within the range of 4.5-11.2 mg/dl. Thirty-nine subjects hadnormal TSH levels, ranged from 0.9 to 5.0 mlU/ml, and 2 subjectsshowed increased TSH levels of 6.8 and 7.6 mlU/ml, respectively.Reduced T4 and TSH levels of 3.93 mg/dl and 0.2 mlU/ml, respectivelywere detected in one subjectConclusion In general, the T4 & TSH levels were still normal,with only one subject (2%) showed low levels of T4 & TSH.
The influence of stressor on blood pressure in school children Pardede, Sudung O; Trihono, Partini P; Yuniar, Irene; Tambunan, Taralan
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 43 No 2 (2003): March 2003
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (237.648 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi43.2.2003.35-7

Abstract

Background Physical and psychological stress such as child anxi-ety, can increase blood pressure.Objective To evaluate the role of vein puncture as a stressor caus-ing alteration of blood pressure in school children.Methods This study was a descriptive, pre and post test study asa part of a screening study on primary school children at Cibubursubdistrict in East Jakarta. Blood pressure was measured beforeand after a vein puncture procedure in 449 children. Nine childrenwere excluded because of incomplete data.Results The increase of systolic blood pressure was found in 121(27.5%) subjects, decrease in 42 (9.5%), and no change in 227(63%). Diastolic blood pressure increased in 123 (28.0%) subjects,decreased in 38 (8.6%), and did not change in 279 (63.4%). Theincrease of both systolic and diastolic blood pressure was found in61 (13.8%), increased systolic with no change of diastolic in 58(13.2%), and increased systolic with decreased diastolic in 2 (0.5%)children. Decreased systolic with increased diastolic was found in2 (0.5%) subjects, decreased systolic with no change of diastolicin 26 (5.9%), and decrease of both systolic and diastolic in 14 (3.2%)children. No changes in both systolic and diastolic blood pressurewere found in 195 (44.3%); no change in systolic with decreaseddiastolic blood pressure was found in 22 (5.0%) children.Conclusion In most of the school children, vein puncture proce-dure did not cause alteration on blood pressure
Familial hypophosphatemic rickets: report of a case Tehuteru, Edi S; Tambunan, Taralan
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 43 No 2 (2003): March 2003
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (187.562 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi43.2.2003.70-2

Abstract

Familial Hypophosphatemic Rickets (FHR) wasfound for the first time by Albright in 1937 andis also called vitamin D resistant rickets. 1-3 It isa disease that can occur through x-linked dominant,autosom dominant, and sporadic inheritance. 1-4Albright found that most FHR is x-linked dominanttype. 3 To distinguish between x-linked dominant andautosom dominant, the family pedigree can not beused, because it may look alike. Usually this diseasecan be distinguished genetically. The gene that isresponsible for x-linked dominant is located in Xp21while for autosom dominant is in 12p13. 4 Sporadictype can easily be distinguished from the other two.In the family pedigree, there is no other FHR patientbesides the patient himself. 3,4 The case that we areabout to report was a sporadic type FHR.
Lactose malabsorption in junior high school children Budiarso, Aswitha D.; Sofia, Deny; Hadinegoro, Sri Rezeki S; Hegar, Badriul
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 43 No 2 (2003): March 2003
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi43.2.2003.46-50

Abstract

Background The prevalence of lactose malabsorption varieswidely throughout the world. Only people of Caucasian geneticbackground continue to produce high amount of lactase throughoutadulthood. Previous studies in Indonesia revealed that theprevalence of lactose malabsorption was 21-58% in children aged3-11 years.Objective To determine the prevalence of lactose malabsorptionin the older age group and whether a change in milk drinking habitcan affect it.Methods A cross sectional descriptive study was conducted on98 children aged between 12 and 14 years (junior high school) inJakarta. Lactose malabsorption was evaluated with LactometerBreath Hydrogen Test (Hoek Loes, Amsterdam). Milk drinking habitwas recorded, and drinking at least 1 glass of milk everyday since6 months or more before the study was considered as regular milkdrinking.Results This study showed 73% of the children had lactose malabsorption.Regular milk drinking habit was found in 32 (33%) childrenand lactose malabsorption occurred in 26. From 66 childrenwho were irregular milk drinkers, lactose malabsorption was foundin 46 (70%). Lactose intolerance was about the same in both groups.Conclusion There was an increasing prevalence of lactose malabsorptionin older children. Milk drinking habit is a major concernto review the practical implications of lactose malabsorption.
Obesity among children aged 10-13 years in public and private elementary schools Kamelia, Evi; Nurdiani, Nurdiani; Sembiring, Tiansa; Hakimi, Hakimi; Lubis, Iskandar Z
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 43 No 2 (2003): March 2003
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (256.551 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi43.2.2003.38-41

Abstract

Background In the last few years, the prevalence of obesity amongIndonesian children has been beginning to increase slowly, butstudies and publications about obesity are limited. In accordancewith the improvement of social economic and child health, obesitycan be seen more frequently as a problem in children.Objective To evaluate and compare the prevalence and relatedfactors of obesity among children 10-13 year-old who were stu-dents of two kinds of school, namely public and private elementaryschool.Methods A cross sectional study was done from October untilDecember 1995 on 276 elementary school students aged 10-13years consisting of 138 public and 138 private elementary schoolstudents. Data were collected by a questionnaire including anam-nesis of family history and type of daily diet, physical examination,and anthropometric measurement.Results The prevalence of obesity among children in the publicand private elementary schools was 9% and 20% respectively,which showed a significant difference (p<0.01). The prevalence ofobesity among children was significantly related to parents’ wel-fare, excessive daily calorie intake, level of physical activity, andobesity problem in the family.Conclusion The prevalence of obesity in students of private andpublic elementary schools was 20% and 9% respectively. Socialeconomic level, calorie intake, sport activities, and obesity prob-lems in the family are factors related to the prevalence of childobesity
Risk factors of coronary heart disease in children and young adults with parental history of premature coronary heart disease Andriastuti, Murti; Sastroasmoro, Sudigdo; Firmansyah, Agus
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 43 No 2 (2003): March 2003
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (485.542 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi43.2.2003.51-8

Abstract

Background Morbidity and mortality of coronary heart disease(CHD) are recently increasing. This is related to changes in lifestyle,such as lack of activity and high consumption of fatty diet. Themain cause of CHD is atherosclerosis. The development of ath-erosclerosis takes a long time, is asymptomatic, and might beginin childhood. The important risk factors that have roles in increas-ing the likelihood of atherosclerosis are family history of prematureCHD, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, obesity, smoking and irregu-lar activity.Objective The aim of this study was to find out the prevalence ofCHD risk factors in children and young adults who had parentalhistory of premature CHD.Methods This was a descriptive cross sectional study conductedon offspring of premature CHD patients who were admitted in theintensive cardiology care unit (ICCU) of Cipto MangunkusumoHospital between January 1999 to December 2001 and of prema-ture CHD patients who visited the Cardiology Clinic of the Depart-ment of Internal Medicine, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital duringMarch and April 2002. Subjects were aged 12 to 25 year-old.Results Among the subjects, 40% had hyperlipidemia, 8% hadhypertension, 11% were obese, 21% were active smokers, 41%were passive smokers, and 73% had irregular activity. Ninety-sevenpercents subjects had more than 1 risk factors.Conclusions The prevalence of hyperlipidemia, hypertension,obesity, passive smoker, active smoker and irregular activity inchildren and young adults with parental history of premature CHDin this study were higher than those in the normal population.Most had more than 1 risk factor, increasing the likelihood of CHD.A screening test should be performed on children with parentalhistory of premature CHD so that early preventive measures mightbe done to minimize the risk factors
Neurological impairment of children with history of prematurity and neonatal hyperbilirubinemia Subanada, Ida Bagus; Kari, I Komang; Hamid, Abdul
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 43 No 2 (2003): March 2003
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (398.661 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi43.2.2003.59-65

Abstract

Background In premature infants, the incidence of hyperbiliru-binemia is still high. Bilirubin encephalopathy can develop withoutmarked hyperbilirubinemia.Objective To know the incidence of neurological impairment inpremature with hyperbilirubinemia and the association betweenneurological impairment and serum unconjugated billirubin con-centration.Methods A retrospective study was conducted on 54 prematureswith history of hyperbilirubinemia and 54 without history of hyper-bilirubinemia born between 1997 and 1998 and discharged fromSanglah Hospital. Consecutive sampling was done. After univariateanalysis, multivariate analysis was used to identify the associationbetween serum unconjugated bilirubin concentration and neuro-logical impairment at the adjusted age of 318 months.Results There were statistically significant differences in mean ofage and neurological impairment between subjects with and with-out hyperbilirubinemia (p<0.0001 and 0.026). In subjects with hy-perbilirubinemia, univariate analysis showed significant differencesin means of serum unconjugated bilirubin concentration, gesta-tional age, birth weight, and serum albumin concentration betweensubject who had neurological impairment and who had no neuro-logical impairment with p = 0.005; 0.001; 0.002; <0.0001, respec-tively. Multivariate analysis found there were association betweenneurological impairment and serum unconjugated bilirubin concen-tration, gestational age, and serum albumin concentration withp<0.0001; 0.004; and <0.0001, respectively.Conclusion Neurological impairment in subject with hyperbiliru-binemia was greater than subject without hyperbilirubinemia. Se-rum unconjugated bilirubin concentration is one of three factorsthat associated with neurological impairment
Effect of particulate matter (PM 10) pollutant concentration on peak expiratory flow rate score in junior high school students Sawitri, Niken; Rosmajudi, Oma; Subardja, Dedi; D N, Heda Melinda
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 43 No 2 (2003): March 2003
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (260.942 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi43.2.2003.66-9

Abstract

Background Various pollutants especially particulate matter withdiameter of 10 micrometer or less (PM 10) reduce the function oflung. However, its effect to peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) as aparameter of central airway resistance is still inconsistent.Objective This study was designed to assess the impact of differ-ent PM 10 concentration to PEFR score among junior high schoolstudents who live in two areas.Methods It was a descriptive analytical study with cross sectionaldesign to junior high school students who lived in areas with highPM 10 i.e, Cililin sub district (252.63 mg/m 3 /h) and low PM 10 i.e.,Paseh sub district (27.15 mg/m 3 /h). PEFR was measured by usingMini Wright Peak Flow Meter and body weight by microtoire. Dataof indoor pollutants were collected from questionnaires.Results There were 463 subjects, 242 students in Cililin and 221students in Paseh, who fulfilled the inclusion criteria which wereaged 12 –15 years, living more than one years continuously withinradius of 5 km from the location of pollutant measurement, nonsmokers, and considered “health” according to history taking andphysical examination. The PEFR score in Cililin (305.9+57.9 l/min)was significantly lower than that in Paseh (327.7+54.8 l/min (t=4.15;p<0.001)).Conclusion Although the influence of indoor pollutants especiallycooking stoves could not be ignored, the difference of PEFR scorein these two groups were possibly due to the different concentra-tion of PM 10

Page 1 of 1 | Total Record : 8


Filter by Year

2003 2003


Filter By Issues
All Issue Vol 60 No 3 (2020): May 2020 Vol 60 No 2 (2020): March 2020 Vol 60 No 1 (2020): January 2020 Vol 59 No 6 (2019): November 2019 Vol 59 No 5 (2019): September 2019 Vol 59 No 4 (2019): July 2019 Vol 59 No 3 (2019): May 2019 Vol 59 No 2 (2019): March 2019 Vol 59 No 1 (2019): January 2019 Vol 59 No 3 (2019): May 2019 Vol 59 No 2 (2019): March 2019 Vol 58 No 6 (2018): November 2018 Vol 58 No 5 (2018): September 2018 Vol 58 No 4 (2018): July 2018 Vol 58 No 3 (2018): May 2018 Vol 58 No 2 (2018): March 2018 Vol 58 No 1 (2018): January 2018 Vol 57 No 6 (2017): November 2017 Vol 57 No 5 (2017): September 2017 Vol 57 No 4 (2017): July 2017 Vol 57 No 3 (2017): May 2017 Vol 57 No 2 (2017): March 2017 Vol 57 No 1 (2017): January 2017 Vol 56 No 6 (2016): November 2016 Vol 56 No 5 (2016): September 2016 Vol 56 No 4 (2016): July 2016 Vol 56 No 3 (2016): May 2016 Vol 56 No 2 (2016): March 2016 Vol 56 No 1 (2016): January 2016 Vol 55 No 1 (2015): January 2015 Vol 55 No 6 (2015): November 2015 Vol 55 No 5 (2015): September 2015 Vol 55 No 4 (2015): July 2015 Vol 55 No 3 (2015): May 2015 Vol 55 No 2 (2015): March 2015 Vol 55 No 1 (2015): January 2015 Vol 54 No 6 (2014): November 2014 Vol 54 No 5 (2014): September 2014 Vol 54, No 6 (2014): November 2014 Vol 54, No 5 (2014): September 2014 Vol 54 No 6 (2014): November 2014 Vol 54 No 5 (2014): September 2014 Vol 54 No 4 (2014): July 2014 Vol 54 No 3 (2014): May 2014 Vol 54 No 2 (2014): March 2014 Vol 54 No 1 (2014): January 2014 Vol 53 No 6 (2013): November 2013 Vol 53 No 5 (2013): September 2013 Vol 53 No 4 (2013): July 2013 Vol 53 No 3 (2013): May 2013 Vol 53 No 2 (2013): March 2013 Vol 53 No 1 (2013): January 2013 Vol 52 No 6 (2012): November 2012 Vol 52 No 5 (2012): September 2012 Vol 52 No 4 (2012): July 2012 Vol 52 No 3 (2012): May 2012 Vol 52 No 2 (2012): March 2012 Vol 52 No 1 (2012): January 2012 Vol 51 No 6 (2011): November 2011 Vol 51 No 5 (2011): September 2011 Vol 51 No 4 (2011): July 2011 Vol 51 No 3 (2011): May 2011 Vol 51 No 2 (2011): March 2011 Vol 51 No 1 (2011): January 2011 Vol 50 No 5 (2010): September 2010 Vol 50 No 4 (2010): July 2010 Vol 50 No 2 (2010): March 2010 Vol 50 No 1 (2010): January 2010 Vol 50, No 5 (2010): September 2010 Vol 50, No 4 (2010): July 2010 Vol 50, No 2 (2010): March 2010 Vol 50 No 6 (2010): November 2010 Vol 50 No 5 (2010): September 2010 Vol 50 No 3 (2010): May 2010 Vol 50 No 2 (2010): March 2010 Vol 50 No 1 (2010): January 2010 Vol 49 No 6 (2009): November 2009 Vol 49 No 5 (2009): September 2009 Vol 49 No 4 (2009): July 2009 Vol 49 No 3 (2009): May 2009 Vol 49 No 2 (2009): March 2009 Vol 49 No 1 (2009): January 2009 Vol 48 No 6 (2008): November 2008 Vol 48 No 5 (2008): September 2008 Vol 48 No 4 (2008): July 2008 Vol 48 No 3 (2008): May 2008 Vol 48 No 2 (2008): March 2008 Vol 48 No 1 (2008): January 2008 Vol 47 No 6 (2007): November 2007 Vol 47 No 5 (2007): September 2007 Vol 47 No 4 (2007): July 2007 Vol 47 No 3 (2007): May 2007 Vol 47 No 2 (2007): March 2007 Vol 47 No 1 (2007): January 2007 Vol 46 No 6 (2006): November 2006 Vol 46 No 5 (2006): September 2006 Vol 46 No 4 (2006): July 2006 Vol 46 No 3 (2006): May 2006 Vol 46 No 2 (2006): March 2006 Vol 46 No 1 (2006): January 2006 Vol 45 No 6 (2005): November 2005 Vol 45 No 5 (2005): September 2005 Vol 45 No 4 (2005): July 2005 Vol 45 No 3 (2005): May 2005 Vol 45 No 2 (2005): March 2005 Vol 45 No 1 (2005): January 2005 Vol 44 No 6 (2004): November 2004 Vol 44 No 5 (2004): September 2004 Vol 44 No 4 (2004): July 2004 Vol 44 No 3 (2004): May 2004 Vol 44 No 2 (2004): March 2004 Vol 44 No 1 (2004): January 2004 Vol 43 No 6 (2003): November 2003 Vol 43 No 5 (2003): September 2003 Vol 43 No 4 (2003): July 2003 Vol 43 No 3 (2003): May 2003 Vol 43 No 2 (2003): March 2003 Vol 43 No 1 (2003): January 2003 Vol 42 No 9-10 (2002): September 2002 Vol 42 No 5-6 (2002): May 2002 Vol 42 No 11-12 (2002): November 2002 Vol 42, No 6 (2002): November 2002 Vol 42, No 5 (2002): September 2002 Vol 41 No 9-10 (2001): September 2001 Vol 41 No 7-8 (2001): July 2001 Vol 41 No 5-6 (2001): May 2001 Vol 41 No 3-4 (2001): March 2001 Vol 41 No 11-12 (2001): November 2001 Vol 41, No 6 (2001): November 2001 Vol 41, No 5 (2001): September 2001 Vol 41, No 4 (2001): July 2001 Vol 41, No 3 (2001): May 2001 Vol 41, No 2 (2001): March 2001 Vol 41 No 1-2 (2001): January 2001 Vol 39 No 9-10 (1999): September 1999 Vol 39 No 7-8 (1999): July 1999 Vol 39 No 5-6 (1999): May 1999 Vol 39 No 3-4 (1999): March 1999 Vol 39 No 11-12 (1999): November 1999 Vol 39 No 1-2 (1999): January 1999 Vol 39, No 3-4 (1999): March 1999 Vol 39, No 1-2 (1999): January 1999 Vol 38 No 9-10 (1998): September 1998 Vol 38 No 3-4 (1998): March 1998 Vol 38 No 11-12 (1998): November 1998 Vol 38 No 1-2 (1998): January 1998 Vol 37 No 9-10 (1997): September-October 1997 Vol 37 No 5-6 (1997): May-June 1997 Vol 37 No 3-4 (1997): March-April 1997 Vol 37 No 1-2 (1997): January-February 1997 Vol 37, No 9-10 (1997): September-October 1997 Vol 37, No 5-6 (1997): May-June 1997 Vol 37, No 3-4 (1997): March-April 1997 Vol 37, No 1-2 (1997): January-February 1997 Vol 36 No 7-8 (1996): July-August 1996 Vol 36 No 5-6 (1996): May-June 1996 Vol 36 No 11-12 (1996): November-December 1996 Vol 36, No 7-8 (1996): July-August 1996 Vol 36, No 5-6 (1996): May-June 1996 Vol 36, No 11-12 (1996): November-December 1996 Vol 35 No 1-2 (1995): January 1995 Vol 35 No 9-10 (1995): September 1995 Vol 35 No 7-8 (1995): July 1995 Vol 35 No 5-6 (1995): May 1995 Vol 35 No 3-4 (1995): March 1995 Vol 34 No 7-8 (1994): July 1994 Vol 34 No 5-6 (1994): May 1994 Vol 34 No 3-4 (1994): March 1994 Vol 34 No 1-2 (1994): January 1994 Vol 33 No 7-8 (1993): July 1993 Vol 33 No 5-6 (1993): May 1993 Vol 33 No 3-4 (1993): March 1993 Vol 33 No 1-2 (1993): January 1993 Vol 32 No 7-8 (1992): July 1992 Vol 32 No 5-6 (1992): May 1992 Vol 32 No 3-4 (1992): March 1992 Vol 32 No 11-12 (1992): November 1992 Vol 31 No 5-6 (1991): May 1991 Vol 31 No 3-4 (1991): March 1991 Vol 31 No 11-12 (1991): November 1991 Vol 31, No 11-12 (1991): November 1991 Vol 31 No 9-10 (1991): September 1991 Vol 31 No 7-8 (1991): July 1991 Vol 31 No 5-6 (1991): May 1991 Vol 30 No 11-12 (1990): November 1990 Vol 29 No 3-4 (1989): March 1989 Vol 29 No 1-2 (1989): January 1989 Vol 29, No 9-10 (1989): September 1989 Vol 29, No 5-6 (1989): May 1989 Vol 29, No 1-2 (1989): January 1989 Vol 29 No 9-10 (1989): September 1989 Vol 29 No 7-8 (1989): July 1989 Vol 29 No 5-6 (1989): May 1989 Vol 29 No 3-4 (1989): March 1989 Vol 29 No 11-12 (1989): November 1989 Vol 28 No 9-10 (1988): September 1988 Vol 28 No 7-8 (1988): July 1988 Vol 28 No 3-4 (1988): March 1988 Vol 28 No 11-12 (1988): November 1988 Vol 28 No 5-6 (1988): May 1988 Vol 28 No 1-2 (1988): January 1988 Vol 26 No 4 (1986): July 1986 Vol 25 No 5-6 (1985): May 1985 Vol 24 No 7-8 (1984): July 1984 Vol 24 No 1-2 (1984): January 1984 Vol 24 No 9-10 (1984): September 1984 Vol 24 No 7-8 (1984): July 1984 Vol 24 No 5-6 (1984): May 1984 Vol 24 No 3-4 (1984): March 1984 Vol 24 No 11-12 (1984): November 1984 Vol 24 No 1-2 (1984): January 1984 Vol 22 No 9-10 (1982): September 1982 Vol 22 No 7-8 (1982): July 1982 Vol 22 No 5-6 (1982): May 1982 Vol 22 No 3-4 (1982): March 1982 Vol 22 No 11-12 (1982): November 1982 Vol 22 No 1-2 (1982): January 1982 Vol 22, No 9-10 (1982): September 1982 Vol 22, No 7-8 (1982): July 1982 Vol 22, No 5-6 (1982): May 1982 Vol 22, No 3-4 (1982): March 1982 Vol 22, No 11-12 (1982): November 1982 Vol 22, No 1-2 (1982): January 1982 Vol 21 No 9-10 (1981): September 1981 Vol 21 No 7-8 (1981): July 1981 Vol 21 No 5-6 (1981): May 1981 Vol 21 No 3-4 (1981): March 1981 Vol 21 No 11-12 (1981): November 1981 Vol 21 No 1-2 (1981): January 1981 Vol 21, No 9-10 (1981): September 1981 Vol 21, No 7-8 (1981): July 1981 Vol 21, No 5-6 (1981): May 1981 Vol 21, No 3-4 (1981): March 1981 Vol 21, No 11-12 (1981): November 1981 Vol 21, No 1-2 (1981): January 1981 Vol 20 No 3-4 (1980): March 1980 Vol 19 No 9-10 (1979): September 1979 Vol 19 No 3-4 (1979): March 1979 Vol 19 No 11-12 (1979): November 1979 Vol 19 No 1-2 (1979): January 1979 Vol 18 No 9-10 (1978): September 1978 Vol 18 No 5-6 (1978): May 1978 Vol 18 No 3-4 (1978): March 1978 Vol 18 No 11-12 (1978): November 1978 Vol 18 No 1-2 (1978): January 1978 Vol 16 No 9-10 (1976): September 1976 Vol 16 No 3-4 (1976): March 1976 Vol 16 No 1-2 (1976): January 1976 Vol 15 No 9-10 (1975): September 1975 Vol 15 No 7-8 (1975): July 1975 Vol 15 No 3-4 (1975): March 1975 Vol 15 No 11-12 (1975): November 1975 Vol 15 No 1-2 (1975): January 1975 Vol 14 No 9-10 (1974): September 1974 Vol 14 No 7-8 (1974): July 1974 Vol 14 No 5-6 (1974): May 1974 Vol 14 No 3-4 (1974): March 1974 Vol 14 No 11-12 (1974): November 1974 Vol 14 No 1-2 (1974): January 1974 Vol 13 No 4 (1973): April 1973 Vol 13 No 3 (1973): March 1973 Vol 13 No 2 (1973): February 1973 Vol 13 No 1 (1973): January 1973 Vol 13, No 4 (1973): April 1973 Vol 13, No 3 (1973): March 1973 Vol 13, No 2 (1973): February 1973 Vol 13, No 1 (1973): January 1973 More Issue