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Paediatrica Indonesiana
ISSN : 00309311     EISSN : 2338476X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
Paediatrica Indonesiana is a medical journal devoted to the health, in a broad sense, affecting fetuses, infants, children, and adolescents, belonged to the Indonesian Pediatric Society. Its publications are directed to pediatricians and other medical practitioners or researchers at all levels of health practice throughout the world.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 8 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 43 No 3 (2003): May 2003" : 8 Documents clear
The first 24-hour bilirubin level as a predictor of hyperbilirubinemia in healthy term newborns Triasih, Rina; Haksari, Ekawaty L; Surjono, Achmad
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 43 No 3 (2003): May 2003
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (413.271 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi43.3.2003.85-90

Abstract

Background Early discharging healthy term newborns results ina difficulty to recognize hyperbilirubinemia.Objective The aim of this study was to determine the value of thefirst 24-hour total and unbound bilirubin levels in predicting hyper-bilirubinemia in healthy term newborns.Methods The first 24-hour and the 5 th day total and unboundbilirubin levels were measured in 84 healthy term newborns. Thetotal bilirubin level was measured spectrophotometrically, whereasunbound bilirubin level was determined by peroxidase-oxidationmethod. Hyperbilirubinemia was defined as serum total bilirubin of>12.9 mg/dL or serum unbound bilirubin of >0.5 mg/dL after 24hours of life.Results A correlation between the first 24-hour and the 5 th daytotal bilirubin levels was found (r= 0.53) with a regression equa-tion: Y (total bilirubin on day 5) = 4.69 + 1.15X (total bilirubin in thefirst 24 hours). In unbound bilirubin (r=0.31), the regression equa-tion was Y (unbound bilirubin on day 5) = 0.13 + 0.95X (unboundbilirubin in the first 24-hours). The relative risk for developing hy-perbilirubinemia in newborns whose TB 1 was >4.5 mg/dL was 12(95% CI 2.9;48.4), whereas newborns whose UB 1 was >0.09 mg/dL was 9.5 (95% CI 1.2;77.4).Conclusion Total bilirubin level of >4.5 mg/dL in the first 24 hourscan predict the development of hyperbilirubinemia in term new-borns in the first week of life. Newborns with such level of totalbilirubin need a longer stay or should visit the hospital on day 5-7
Association between Plasmodium falciparum parasite index and renal function in children Umboh, A; Muljanto, S; Wibisono, J S
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 43 No 3 (2003): May 2003
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (307.604 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi43.3.2003.91-4

Abstract

Background Falciparum malaria is an acute systemic diseasethat can cause multi organ disorders including in kidney. The aimof this study was to figure out the association between P.falciparumparasite index and renal function in children by measuring ureum,creatinine, and glomerular filtration rate (GFR).Methods An analytic prospective study was conducted on all hos-pitalized falciparum malaria patients in the Department of ChildHealth, Manado Central General Hospital from November 2001-February 2002. Low parasitemia was defined if P.falciparum foundwas ≤100/100 fields and high parasitemia if >1/1 field. Data wereanalyzed by chi-square and student t–test.Results Among 34 patients, there were 11 with high parasitemiaand 23 with low parasitemia. There were 19 with increased ureumand 8 with increased creatinine. There was significant elevation ofureum in high parasitemia (n=10) compared to that in low para-sitemia patients (n=9) with p=0.004. The increase of serum creati-nine was found in 2 high parasitemia and in 6 low parasitemiapatients (p=0.611). Mean GFR was 107.63±30.62 in high and121.94±44.06 in low parasitemia patients (p=0.341).Conclusion There was a significant association betweenP.falciparum parasite index and serum ureum. But there was nosignificant association between parasite index and creatinine orGFR
Association between serum cholesterol levels and nutritional status in school children aged 10-12 years Wulur, Fransiscus H; Pieter, Recky Dj B
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 43 No 3 (2003): May 2003
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (269.134 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi43.3.2003.73-6

Abstract

Background Hypercholesterolemia in children is an important riskfactor that causes coronary heart disease in the future. Nutritionalstatus, especially overweight/obesity, is associated with hyperc-holesterolemia.Objective To determine the prevalence of hypercholesterolemiaand its association with nutritional status.Methods This was a cross sectional study conducted during April-June 2001. Subjects consisted of children aged 10-12 year-oldregistered at primary schools in Manado, Tondano, and TandenganMinahasa. Data were analyzed using t test, z score, and chi-square.Results Of the 229 samples, 153 (66.8%) were boys and 76 (33.2%) were girls. The mean of total cholesterol level in boys was 179.46mg/dL (SD 33.44) and in girls was 180.95 mg/dL (SD 33.77) whichwas not significantly different (p>0.05). There were no differencesin either the number of children having “borderline” cholesterol level(170–199 mg/dL) or hypercholesterolemia (3200 mg/dL) betweenboth sexes. Of the 229 children, 65 (28.4%) had hypercholester-olemia. Of the 65 children, 37 (36%) came from the primary schoolin Manado, which was significant compared to the other schoollocations (p<0.05). Twenty-five (39%) children with hypercholes-terolemia had overweight nutritional status, which was significantcompared to the other nutritional status (p<0.05).Conclusion The prevalence of hypercholesterolemia was 28.4 %.There was an association between hypercholesterolemia and nutri-tional status, with a tendency of hypercholesterolemia to occur atoverweight nutritional status, especially in the urban area
The prevalence of hyaline membrane disease and the value of shake test and lamellar body concentration in preterm infants DLH, Dzulfikar; Usman, Ali; Nataprawira, Melinda D; Primadi, Aris
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 43 No 3 (2003): May 2003
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (330.689 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi43.3.2003.77-81

Abstract

Background The morbidity and mortality of hyaline membrane dis-ease (HMD) are quite high due to delayed diagnosis and intervention.Commonly, HMD occurs in preterm infants with surfactant deficiencybecause of lung immaturity. Lung maturity test could be performedusing biochemical, biophysical, and amniotic fluid turbidity test.Objective To find out HMD prevalence and the value of shaketest and lamellar body concentration in diagnosing HMD in preterminfants.Methods This was a cross-sectional study carried out at HasanSadikin Hospital Bandung on preterm infants born during October-December 2001. The shake test was performed using gastric fluidand amniotic fluid while the lamellar body concentration was per-formed using amniotic fluid.Results During the 3-month period, 571 infants were born, of 64(11.2%) preterm infants, only 41 (64%) fulfilled the inclusion crite-ria; among those preterm infants, 14 (34%) suffered from respira-tory distress and 7 suffered from HMD (prevalence 17%). All HMDcases occurred in infants less than 32 weeks for gestational age.In 7 preterm infants with HMD, the shake test of gastric fluid ob-tained by lavage showed negative results in 3 and +1 in 4 infants;while the shake test of amniotic fluid revealed negative result in 5and +1 in 2 infants. Lamellar body concentration of amniotic fluidwas ≤18,000/ml in all HMD infants. Among three infants less than32 weeks for gestational age who did not suffer from HMD, +1shake test of gastric fluid was found in 2 infants and +2 in 1 infant;while shake test of amniotic fluid showed negative result in 1 infantand +1 in 2; the lamellar body concentration of amniotic fluid was≤18,000/ml in 2 infants and >18,000/ml in 1 infant.Conclusions We concluded that HMD occurred in 17% of preterminfants. The shake test of gastric and amniotic fluids revealed nega-tive or +1 results whereas lamellar body concentration had valueof less than or equal to 18,000/mL. More extensive studies arewarranted to assess the validity (sensitivity, specificity and predic-tive values) of these measurements
Intracranial hemorrhage in hemorrhagic disease of the newborn Mangunatmadja, Irawan; Sundariningrum, Rina W; Pusponegoro, Hardiono D; Windiastuti, Endang
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 43 No 3 (2003): May 2003
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (229.199 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi43.3.2003.82-4

Abstract

Background Hemorrhagic disease of the newborn (HDN) repre-sents a special case of vitamin K deficiency because the four vita-min K-coagulation factors (factors II,VII,IX,X) are already at physi-ologically low levels in the newborn. It responds to vitamin Ktherapy.Objective The aim of this study was to review the incidence, clini-cal manifestation, and outcome of HDN.Methods This was a retrospective cross sectional study on 22patients hospitalized for HDN in the Department of Child Health,Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital from January 1997 until Decem-ber 2001. Data were obtained from medical records.Results The commonest age group (17 out of 22) was 1–3 month-old. Normal delivery was found in 19 patients and only 3 patientsreceived prophylaxis vitamin K. Almost all of them (20 out of 22)were exclusively breastfed. Seizure, pallor, decreased conscious-ness, and bulging of the anterior fontanel were significant clinicalmanifestations found in 21, 21, 13, and 9 patients respectively.Based on brain USG and/or CT scan, intracranial hemorrhage wasfound in 19 patients. Six out of 22 patients died and 7 patientssurvived with handicapConclusion Intracranial hemorrhage due to vitamin K mostly oc-curred at the age of 1 to 3 month-old. The commonest clinical mani-festations were seizure, pallor, decreased consciousness, andbulging of the anterior fontanel. Prevention by giving vitamin K rou-tinely to all newborn babies is recommended
The discrepancy between manual and computerized leukocyte and thrombocyte counts Permono, Bambang; Asih, Retno; Ugrasena, I Dewa Gede
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 43 No 3 (2003): May 2003
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (260.091 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi43.3.2003.95-8

Abstract

Background Discrepancy between results of leukocyte and throm-bocyte count by computerized and manual examination may existObjective To determine the discrepancy between computerizedand manual leukocyte and thrombocyte count.Methods The design was a randomized sampling cross sectionalstudy. The blood sample was examined with computerized CellDyn 1400 instrument for the leukocyte and thrombocyte count. Formanual examination, blood smear was performed to measurethrombocyte while leukocyte was measured in Improved Neubauerhemocytometer. The results of computerized examination wereused as gold standard. Sensitivity, specificity, predictive values ofmanual count were calculated. The agreement of Kappa and McNemar test were determinedResults Blood specimens drawn from 100 patients with differentkinds of diagnoses were examined using computerized and manualmethods. In computerized group, 66% had normal leukocyte and55% had normal thrombocyte count. In the manual group, 78% ofsubjects had normal leukocyte and 82% had normal thrombocytecount. From leukocyte examination, the sensitivity of manual countwas 87.9%, specificity was 41.2%, and positive predictive valuewas 74.36 with the agreement of Kappa of 0.32 and Mc Nemarvalue of 0.036. From thrombocyte examination, the sensitivity was96.4%, specificity was 35.6%, and positive predictive value was64.6 with the agreement of Kappa of 0.41 and Mc Nemar value of0.41.Conclusion The result of manual thrombocyte count was in ac-cordance with computerized with the agreement of Kappa of 0.41.On the other hand, there was a discrepancy between manual infavor of computerized leukocyte count with the agreement of Kappaof 0.32
Orbital rhabdomyosarcoma Wijana, I Putu; Mudita, Ida Bagus; Golden, I Nyoman; Kusumajaya, Agus; Mulyadi, I Ketut
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 43 No 3 (2003): May 2003
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1130.094 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi43.3.2003.99-103

Abstract

we report a case of orbital rhabdomyosa-rcoma in a 2.5 year-old female child.
Intestinal obstruction mimicking intra-abdominal hemorrhage in a teenager with familial thrombocytopenia: a case report Sutaryo, Sutaryo; Ali, Kaiser; Widodo, Untung; Agustriyani, Nunik; Moeljono, Edy; Belletrutti, Mark
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 43 No 3 (2003): May 2003
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (911.043 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi43.3.2003.106-10

Abstract

Inherited bleeding disorders are a heterogeneousgroup of disease that is complicated byhemorrhagic episodes, spontaneous, and post-traumatic. Included in this category of conditionsare Familial Thrombocytopenias (FT). FT are aheterogeneous group of inherited disorders that varyin severity with regard to the degree of reduction inplatelet counts and in expression of bleedingmanifestations. As in acquired thrombocytopenias, FTpatients are at risk for hemorrhagic complications.Rarely, patients with inherited non-thrombocytopeniableeding disorders can develop complications of acuteabdomen 1,2 which present as intraabdominalhemorrhage. We report a case of intestinal obstructionmimicking an uncomplicated intraabdominalhemorrhage in a teenager with FT.

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