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Paediatrica Indonesiana
ISSN : 00309311     EISSN : 2338476X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
Paediatrica Indonesiana is a medical journal devoted to the health, in a broad sense, affecting fetuses, infants, children, and adolescents, belonged to the Indonesian Pediatric Society. Its publications are directed to pediatricians and other medical practitioners or researchers at all levels of health practice throughout the world.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 8 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 43 No 5 (2003): September 2003" : 8 Documents clear
Seroconversion and adverse reaction of live-attenuated (OKA strain) varicella vaccine Ramli, Yulchair; A, Sri Rezeki H; Akib, Arwin P
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 43 No 5 (2003): September 2003
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (396.34 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi43.5.2003.171-6

Abstract

Background Live-attenuated varicella vaccine was used to pre-vent Shingle disease.Objective The aim of this study was to find out seroconversionrate and safety of this vaccine.Methods An open clinical trial was conducted on 313 children atCipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta between March and Octo-ber 1998. The data were analyzed to distribution frequency andtables.Results Only 43 out of 356 (12.1%) children had positiveantivaricella antibody before vaccination. Seroconversion exami-nation by indirect immunoflouresence method was done only onrandomly 150 of 313 (50%) children due to financial limitation. Itwas found that 99.3% of patients had positive seroconversion.Among 298 children who were followed, the nature of symptom ofadverse reaction was mostly general than local. Only one patienthad local symptom after vaccination that appeared within 7 daysof the follow up period.Conclusion Varicella vaccine (OKA strain) gives highseroconversion rate with minimal adverse events
Macro- and micronutrient intakes among severely malnourished under-five children during the economic crisis in Yogyakarta Prawirohartono, Endy P; Werdiningsih, Atiek
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 43 No 5 (2003): September 2003
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (330.81 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi43.5.2003.186-91

Abstract

Objective To evaluate macro and micronutrient intakes amongunder five-year children with severe malnutrition during the periodof economic crisis.Methods We conducted a longitudinal study from August untilNovember 2000 in Bantul and Sleman districts, Yogyakarta Spe-cial Territory of Indonesia. Two-weekly home visits were performedto collect data about food intakes.Results Of 46 children, 26 experienced an improvement in nutri-tional status, whereas 20 children did not. The median intakes ofmacro and 8micronutrients were lower than the RecommendedDaily Allowances (RDA), ranged from 22% (vitamin C) to 69%(phosphorus), except for vitamin A (406%). The median intakes ofprotein, vitamin A, thiamin, vitamin C, calcium, iron and phospho-rus were higher in severely malnourished children who experiencedimprovement in nutritional status compared to children who didnot, and in breastfed compared to non-breastfed, but Mann WhitneyU-test was not able to detect significant differences (p>0.05). Strati-fication using age group showed that calories and thiamin intakesof older children (348 months) were lower than those of youngerchildren (Kruskal Wallis tests p = 0.016 and 0.022 respectively).Conclusions The macro and micronutrients intakes of severelymalnourished under five-year children were lower than RDA, ex-cept for vitamin A. There were differences in nutrient intakes ac-cording to the improvement in nutritional status and age group
The occurrence of pulmonary hypertension in patients with thalassemia major Basri, Hasan; Firman, Armijn; Rusmil, Kusnandi; Fadlyana, Eddy
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 43 No 5 (2003): September 2003
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (240.461 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi43.5.2003.162-4

Abstract

Background The life of patients with thalassemia major dependson blood transfusions, while repeated blood transfusions may causeadverse effects such as iron deposition in various organs, includ-ing heart and lungs, which eventually increases the pulmonaryarterial pressure.Objective This study was proposed to know the occurrence ofpulmonary hypertension in patients with thalassemia major, mea-sured by echocardiography in the Thalassemia Clinic, Departmentof Child Health, Medical School, Padjadjaran University/HasanSadikin Hospital, Bandung.Methods A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried outon 30 patients with thalassemia major, aged 10-14 year-old whoreceived repeated blood transfusions. The study was conductedfrom April to May 2002. Subjects were examined right after ablood transfusion completed and the pulmonary arterial pres-sure was assessed using Doppler–echocardiography and 2-Dechocardiography.Results Twenty two out of 30 subjects showed pulmonary hyper-tension, with pulmonary arterial pressure ranged between 32.3 to46.2 mmHg. According to the age group, pulmonary hypertensionwas found in 12 out of 17 subjects aged 10-12 years old and 10out of 13 subjects aged 13-14 years old.Conclusion The occurrence of pulmonary hypertension in patientswith thalassemia major at Hasan Sadikin Hospital was 22/30 andseemed to increase with the age of the patients
Clinical predictors of hypoxemia in pneumonia Gunawijaya, Eka; Widia, I M
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 43 No 5 (2003): September 2003
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (419.234 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi43.5.2003.192-8

Abstract

Background Pneumonia is one of the main causes of death ininfants in developing countries. The device of oxygen saturationmeasurement for detecting hypoxemia is limited in district hospi-tals.Objective The aim of our study was to find the best clinical pre-dictor for hypoxemia that could be used in Indonesia.Methods Between June 2001 until May 2002, the diagnostic testwas performed in 125 infants aged 2–12 month-old who sufferedfrom pneumonia. The oxygen saturation measured by pulse oxim-etry was used as the gold standard.Results The samples were divided into two groups, 52 infants withhypoxemia and 73 normal. The base characteristics of both groupswere not statistically different. The prevalence of hypoxemia was41.6%. The best single clinical predictor of hypoxemia was cyano-sis (the sensitivity 92%, specificity 86%, likelihood ratio 6.74, post-test probability 83%), as well as the combination of two clinicalpredictors i.e., cyanosis and nasal flaring. The best combination ofthree clinical predictors was cyanosis, nasal flaring, and refusal todrink (the sensitivity 92%, specificity 86%, likelihood ratio 6.74,post-test probability 81%).Conclusion The combination of cyanosis and nasal flaring isgood enough as a predictor to detect hypoxemia in area with nofacility of oxygen saturation measurement
Immunological basis of vaccination Harsono, Ariyanto
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 43 No 5 (2003): September 2003
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (820.681 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi43.5.2003.151-7

Abstract

The basic mechanisms of body defencesagainst infectious diseases are both non-specific and specific immune systems. Non-specific immunity refers to mechanism ofprotection that do not require specific recognition ofantigen, but that increase the protection afforded byspecific immune mechanisms. Non-specific immunemechanisms include phagocytes, acute inflammatoryresponses, type-1 interferon, and tumour necrosingfactor. Specific immunity consists of mechanisms ofprotection that require specific recognition of antigen.This immunity is highly specific, inducible,discriminatory and unforgotten T lymphocyte-dependent response. Normal specific immunityoperates under Major Histocompatibility Complexrestriction. It is the ability of this immune system torefine its antigen recognition domains and establishimmunological memory that underlies the success ofactive vaccination.
Giardiasis in daycare centers at Rancabali tea plantation, Bandung District, Indonesia Widajanti, Endang; Garna, Herry; Chairulfatah, Alex; Hudaya, Dadang
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 43 No 5 (2003): September 2003
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (299.836 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi43.5.2003.158-61

Abstract

Background In developing countries, the prevalence of giardia-sis in daycare centers is considerably high. There had been inad-equate report of giardiasis in Indonesia.Objective To know the prevalence of giardiasis in children andthe number of children with symptomatic and asymptomatic giar-diasis who attended daycare centers at Rancabali tea plantation,Bandung district.Methods This descriptive study was conducted in daycare cen-ters between August to October 2002. Giardiasis was defined asthe occurrence of G. lamblia cyst in stool specimen independentfrom the presence or absence of symptoms. Four of 12 daycarecenters were chosen by cluster random sampling. All children aged1 to 60 months attending daycare and staying for at least 2 weekswere included in this study. Three consecutive stool specimen pre-served by 10% formalin, concentrated by formalin ether, were ex-amined microscopically to find the G. lamblia cyst.Results Giardia lamblia cysts were found in 27 (29%) of the 92children attending the daycare centers at Rancabali tea plantation(95%CI 20;38.6%). Of these children, 15 showed symptoms suchas diarrhea episodes (8 children), diarrhea (5 children), bloating (5children), abdominal cramp (5 children), and vomiting (3 children).Three children showed mild to moderate malnutrition. Ten childrenaged 13 to 36 month-old with G. lamblia-positive stool showed suchsymptoms.Conclusion The prevalence of G. lamblia infection in children at-tending daycare centers at Rancabali tea plantation was almostsimilar with other place in developing countries. More than half ofpatients had symptomatic disease
Comparison of continuous infusion and bolus administration of tramadol in postoperative children Tikoalu, Jeanne-Roos; Darwis, Darlan; Madiyono, Bambang
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 43 No 5 (2003): September 2003
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (393.351 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi43.5.2003.165-70

Abstract

Objective To appraise the efficacy of tramadol therapy given bycontinuous infusion and bolus in handling child’s postoperative painthat is mostly inadequate.Methods This was a randomized, single-blinded clinical trial withparallel design. The study was done in the operation room, recov-ery room, pediatric intensive care unit, pediatric surgery, and pedi-atric ward of Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia.There were sixty patients, 1-12 year-old, with elective operationbetween January and April 2002. Both groups received bolus of2mg/kg tramadol as an initial dose. Twenty-nine subjects receivedcontinuous infusion of 0.22 mg/kg/h tramadol in 15 minutes after-wards. The other 31 subjects received the same boluses for every6 hours. Before each tramadol administration, evaluation was doneby observer using objective pain scale (OPS) and evaluation sheetthat had been tested before the study. The study was done within24 hours post surgery.Results In the first 6 postoperative hours, mean total dose givenby continuous infusion was significantly greater than that given bybolus (p=0.006). On the contrary, mean total dose given within 24hours by continuous infusion was significantly less than that givenby bolus (p=0.037). All subjects showed OPS result of 36 in 0 minute.After that, the result decreased, except in 9 subjects it was still >6in the 15 th minute. Vomiting was the commonest side effect.Conclusion Continuous infusion of tramadol within 24 hours canbe recommended as an analgesic in postoperative children
The efficacy of fortified human milk compared to human milk alone for the growth of low birth weight infants Ketut, Dewi Kumara Wati; Soetjiningsih, Soetjiningsih; IKG, Suandi; A, Hamid H
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 43 No 5 (2003): September 2003
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (579.444 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi43.5.2003.177-85

Abstract

Objective To evaluate the growth of low birth weight infants fedby fortified human milk (FHM) compared to human milk (HM) alone.Methods Sixty premature infants enrolled in this study and ran-domly assigned to have FHM and HM delivered by infusofeedpump,in parallel, non-blinded controlled trial. All patients were followeduntil day 30 or until discharge, whichever came first. The weightgain was recorded daily, while length and head circumference in-crement were recorded weekly.Results The FHM group gained more weight than the HM group(335.0+55.5 g vs. 290.6+108.4 g, p=0.000, 95%CI -170.2;-81.2),larger length increment (1.9+1.1cm vs. 1.2+0.4cm, p=0.000, 95%CI-1.37;-0.55), and larger head increment (1.87+1.1cm vs.0.91+0.43cm, 95%CI -1.37;-0.55). A similar result was found whenthe group was divided into subgroup of 1000-1499 g and 1500-1999 g birth weight. The larger calorie intake in the FHM groupwas the reason for better growth. No adverse effect related to theintervention was found.Conclusion The study shows the benefit of FHM in growth of lowbirth weight infants, which is consistent when the group is dividedinto 1000-1499 g birth weight and 1500-1999 g birth weight subgroups. Better growth is achieved through higher calorie intake inthe FHM group. No adverse effect is found as a consequence ofintervention

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