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Paediatrica Indonesiana
ISSN : 00309311     EISSN : 2338476X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
Paediatrica Indonesiana is a medical journal devoted to the health, in a broad sense, affecting fetuses, infants, children, and adolescents, belonged to the Indonesian Pediatric Society. Its publications are directed to pediatricians and other medical practitioners or researchers at all levels of health practice throughout the world.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 8 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 43 No 6 (2003): November 2003" : 8 Documents clear
Fava bean–induced hemolytic crisis in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency Karyana, IPG; Mudita, IB
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 43 No 6 (2003): November 2003
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (229.568 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi43.6.2003.230-3

Abstract

This paper reports a case of hemolytic crisis dueto fava beans in a child with G6PD deficiency.
5-alpha-reductase deficiency: a case report Jong, Diana Mettadewi; Pulungan, Aman B; AAP, Bambang Tridjaja; Batubara, Jose RL
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 43 No 6 (2003): November 2003
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1279.494 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi43.6.2003.234-40

Abstract

The condition of 5-alpha-reductase type 2deficiency (5-ARD) is an inherited disorderresulting in the inability to converttestosterone to dihydrotestosterone(DHT).This disorder was previously termed asfamilial incomplete male pseudohermaphroditism type2, pseudovaginal perineoscrotal hypospadias.Clinical manifestation of 5-ARD is limited to malegenetic. The affected males are usually identifiedas female in childhood but undergo striking virilizationat puberty.While overall incidence for various countries arenot established, increased incidence is reported in theDominican Republic, some highland tribes in NewGuinea, Lebanon and Turkey. This was the firstdocumented case in Cipto Mangunkusumo (CM)Hospital.
Comparison of oxygen saturation measured by pulse oximetry and arterial blood gas analysis in neonates Yanda, Srie; Lubis, Munar; Yusroh, Yoyoh
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 43 No 6 (2003): November 2003
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (305.441 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi43.6.2003.211-5

Abstract

Background Arterial blood gas is usually beneficial to discern thenature of gas exchange disturbances, the effectiveness of com-pensation, and is required for adequate management. AlthoughPaO 2 is the standard measurement of blood oxygenation, oxygensaturation measured by pulse oximetry (SapO 2 ) is now a custom-ary noninvasive assessment of blood oxygenation in newborn in-fants.Objective To compare oxygen saturation measured by pulse oxi-metry (SapO 2 ) and arterial blood gas (SaO 2 ), its correlation withother variables, and to predict arterial partial pressure of oxygen(PaO 2 ) based on SapO 2 values.Methods A cross sectional study was conducted on all neonatesadmitted to Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) during February2001 to May 2002. Neonates were excluded if they had impairedperipheral perfusion and/or congenital heart defects. Paired t-testwas used to compare SapO 2 with SaO 2 . Correlation between twoquantitative data was performed using Pearson’s correlation. Re-gression analysis was used to predict PaO 2 based on SapO 2 val-ues.Results Thirty neonates were included in this study. The differ-ence between SaO 2 and SapO 2 was significant . There were sig-nificant positive correlations between heart rate /pulse rate andTCO 2 , HCO 3 ; respiratory rate and TCO 2 , HCO 3 , base excess (BE);core temperature and HCO 3 , BE; surface temperature and pH,TCO 2, HCO 3, BE; SapO 2 and pH, PaO 2 ; and significant negativecorrelation between SapO 2 and PaCO 2 ; the correlations were weak.The linear regression equation to predict PaO 2 based on SapO 2values was PaO 2 = -79.828 + 1.912 SapO 2 .Conclusion Pulse oximetry could not be used in place of arterialblood gas analysis available for clinical purpose
Clinical and laboratory manifestations of childhood and adult-onset systemic lupus erythematosus in Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital Faisal, Syarif; Akib, Arwin; Tambunan, Taralan
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 43 No 6 (2003): November 2003
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (345.727 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi43.6.2003.199-204

Abstract

Background Childhood-onset SLE is more severe than the adult type.Objective To compare the clinical and laboratory manifestationsof childhood- and adult-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).Methods A retrospective study on child and adult SLE patientswas conducted in the Division of Pediatric Allergy and Immunol-ogy, Department of Child Health and Department of Internal Medi-cine, Medical School, University of Indonesia/CiptoMangunkusumoHospital (FKUI/RSCM) Jakarta.Subjects One hundred and twenty-nine subjects met the studycriteria consisting on 54 childhood- onset (41.9%), 75 adult-onset(58.1%), and 122 (94.6%) females and 7 (5.4%) males from Janu-ary 1995 until December 2000.Results Fever, arthralgia and vasculitis were the most frequentsigns found in both childhood-onset and adult-onset SLE. The liver,spleen, lymph nodes, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal tract, andeyes were the organs involved and significantly had a larger pro-portion in the childhood-onset. Decrease of C3 was more frequentlyfound in the childhood-onset. Out of 17 childhood-onset patientswho died, 13 died at the age of 0-11 year-old. Two of the adult-onset patients also died.Conclusion Childhood-onset SLE had some different character-istics compared to adult form
Acute renal failure in children: outcome and prognostic factors Trihono, Partini P; Soesilo, Ommy A; Suradi, Rulina
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 43 No 6 (2003): November 2003
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (338.389 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi43.6.2003.205-10

Abstract

Background Acute renal failure (ARF) is an emergency conditionwith a high mortality rate despite the long-known dialysis and ad-vanced supportive care. Only few studies on prognostic factors ofARF in children are available in the literature, which are difficult tocompare to each other due to the different definitions of the ARFoutcome used.Objective To find out the clinical and laboratory characteristics ofchildren with acute renal failure and the prognostic factors affect-ing the outcome.Methods This observational prospective study was conducted onchildren with acute renal failure hospitalized in the Department ofChild Health, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, between July andDecember 2001. Patients with acute on chronic renal failure wereexcluded. Clinical and laboratory data were taken at the time ofdiagnosis and the outcomes were noted after 2 weeks of observa-tion. We classified the outcome as cured, uncured, and dead. Ana-lytical study was done to find out the relationships among variousprognostic factors.Results Fifty-six children with ARF were recruited in this study.Male to female ratio was 1.3:1; the mean age was 4.4 year-old.The most frequent presenting symptom was dyspnea (34%), fol-lowed by oliguria (29%). The most frequent primary disease wasmalignancy (20%). Most of the patients had renal-type of ARF(73%). The outcomes were cure (71%), no cure (16%), and death(13%). Bivariate analysis and logistic regression revealed thatyounger age (OR=13.6; 95%CI 1.01;183.60) and the need for di-alysis (OR=10; 95%CI 1.53;65.97) had significant relationships withmortality or no cure.Conclusion We should be aware when finding ARF patientsless than 5 year-old and have the indications for dialysis, due tothe poor prognosis they might have
The incidence of nontransfusion-transmitted infectious diseases in β thalassemia major patients at Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital Munasir, Zakiudin; Ruth, Amy Diana; Tumbelaka, Alan Roland
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 43 No 6 (2003): November 2003
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (254.821 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi43.6.2003.216-9

Abstract

Background The statement that thalassemic children are moreprone to infection than normal children has been accepted as apart of thalassemia literatures for years. Recently this concept hasbeen questioned, and certainly it has impressed the clinicians thatthe incidence of infection in thalassemia in early childhood is re-duced by adequate blood transfusion although this has not beendocumented. However, iron overload favors bacteria to acquireiron necessary for their growth. Excess iron deposit may damageimmune response in thalassemic patients.Objective The aim of this study was to find out whether there wasany increasing episode of nontransfusion-transmitted infectious dis-eases in thalassemic patients.Design Observational, cross sectional study.Setting Thalassemia outpatient clinic at the Department of ChildHealth, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia.Patient Two hundreds subjects by consecutive sampling, groupedby their total volume of transfusion into ≥5 liters or <5 liters groups.Results The numbers of patients receiving transfusion ≥5 literswho had 1,2,3,4 and 5 times episodes of influenza in 6-month pe-riod were 69, 20, 3, 2, and 2 out of 173 patients respectively andin patients receiving transfusion less than 5 liters,14/27 had influ-enza for 1-2 times in 6-month period. The incidence of diarrhea inpatients receiving transfusion ≥5 liters was 11.5%, once to twice in6 months and in patients receiving transfusion less than 5 liters, 7/27, 1-2 times in 6 months. There was no difference in the inci-dence of influenza and diarrhea between the two groups.Conclusion It seemed that there was no any increasing incidenceof nontransfusion-transmitted infectious diseases in thalassemicpatients in accordance with total volume of blood transfusions
Parents’ perceptions of food intolerance among under-five children in Gianyar Bali Prawirohartono, Endy P; Gumala, Ni Made Yuni
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 43 No 6 (2003): November 2003
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (267.643 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi43.6.2003.226-9

Abstract

Objective To estimate the proportion of food intolerance in chil-dren based on parents’ perception and to analyze factors associ-ated with food elimination.Methods A cross-sectional study was done among 250 mothersof under-five children in Gianyar District, Bali. Mothers were inter-viewed with a questionnaire concerning basic characteristics ofthe children, the family, a list of allergic diseases, disturbance afteringesting certain foods, food avoidance, the reason for eliminatingcertain foods, the person who gave advice, and probable parentalhistory of allergic diseases.Results Fifty-three children (21.2%) were suspected to have ‘prob-able allergic diseases’ and six (2.4%) had ‘probable food intoler-ance’. Food elimination was practiced in 27 (10.8%) families. ‘Prob-able allergic parents’ was found in 49 (19.6%) families. There wasa significant difference in child allergy in proportion to parentalallergy (x 2 test p<0.0001). Food elimination was not associatedwith parental allergies, children’s allergies or children’s ages (x 2test p=0.36, 0.47, and 0.56), but seemed to be related to loweducational status of mothers (x 2 test p<0.0001) and fathers(Fisher’s exact tests p< 0.0001).Conclusions The proportion of children with ‘probable allergic dis-eases’ was higher in families with ‘probable allergic parents’. Theproportion of food elimination was greater than the prevalence of‘probable food intolerance’. Low educational status of parentsplayed an important role in this discrepancy of food elimination inchildren
Neonatal birth trauma: incidence and predisposing factors Aminullah, Asril; Budiwardhana, Novik; Firmansyah, Agus
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 43 No 6 (2003): November 2003
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi43.6.2003.220-5

Abstract

Background The incidence of birth trauma and its predisposingfactors at a major teaching hospital in Indonesia had not been reported.Objective To find the incidence of birth trauma, calculate a riskassessment of predisposing factors, to study whether cesareansection lowers birth trauma, and to identify the variety of morbidityand mortality due to birth trauma.Methods The incidence was studied retrospectively from 4843medical records from January 2000 through June 2001 using theICD-10 classification. Birth trauma cases were then included in acase-control study for a risk assessment profile of predisposingfactors with logistic regression analysis.Results Three hundreds and thirty five out of 4843 neonates wereidentified to have birth trauma. Analysis revealed that forcepsextraction (OR=48.29; p<0.01), vacuum extraction (OR=25.37;p<0.01), breech vaginal delivery (OR=3.94; p=0.03), and cesareansection (OR=3.44; p<0.01) were significant risk factors.Macrosomic infant (OR=3.86; p=0.04) was also significant. Birthinjury to face (ICD-10 code P15.4) was the most common finding,followed by cephalhematoma and bruising of the scalp.There was no mortality due to birth trauma.Conclusions The incidence of birth trauma was still high. Cesareansection was found to be one of the risk factors, butcompared to forceps and vacuum extraction, the risk of traumais considered to be more acceptable.

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