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Paediatrica Indonesiana
ISSN : 00309311     EISSN : 2338476X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
Paediatrica Indonesiana is a medical journal devoted to the health, in a broad sense, affecting fetuses, infants, children, and adolescents, belonged to the Indonesian Pediatric Society. Its publications are directed to pediatricians and other medical practitioners or researchers at all levels of health practice throughout the world.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 8 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 44 No 1 (2004): January 2004" : 8 Documents clear
Association between the absence of colostrum feeding and symptoms of intestinal obstruction or neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis Wiryo, Hananto; Hakimi, M.; Wahab, A. Samik; Soeparto, Pitono
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 44 No 1 (2004): January 2004
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (341.337 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi44.1.2004.7-11

Abstract

Objective To assess the relationship between withholding colos-trum and symptoms of intestinal obstruction (SIO) or neonatal ne-crotizing enterocolitis (NNEC).Methods This was a longitudinal cohort study in four subdistrictsin West Lombok involving mothers and live newborns. Motherswere interviewed about prenatal care, delivery process, and prac-tice of colostrum feedings. Neonates were followed everyday for28 days by field assistants for signs of intestinal obstruction orNNEC. We used X 2 test to analyze the association between theabsence of colostrum feeding and the occurence of SIO and stu-dent t test to compare the average of colostrum feeding betweenthe SIO and the non-SIO group.Results 3420 live newborns between 1993-1994 were observed.1900 mothers gave colostrum while 1520 did not. The incidence ofSIO was 1.8%. There was a significant association between theabsence of colostrum feeding and the occurence of the SIO (RR1.816; 95%CI 1.08-3.06; p=0.028). No infants with NNEC weregiven colostrum.Conclusion The absence of colostrum feeding is an importantrisk factor for the occurence of SIO and NNEC in neonates
Stent implantation into ductus arteriosus: a new alternative of palliative treatment of duct-dependent pulmonary circulation Djer, Mulyadi M; Madiyono, Bambang; Sastroasmoro, Sudigdo; Putra, Sukman T; Oesman, Ismet N; Advani, Najib; Alwi, Mazeni
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 44 No 1 (2004): January 2004
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (544.032 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi44.1.2004.30-6

Abstract

Background The technical aspects of ductal stenting have beenreported, but little is known about the fate of the duct after stentimplantation.Objectives To determine the effects of PDA stenting on the degreeof cyanosis, blood oxygen saturation, long-term patency of PDA,and the growth of pulmonary artery and its branches, in patientswith duct-dependent pulmonary circulation.Methods This was a case series study conducted at the Depart-ment of Pediatric Cardiology, Institut Jantung Negara (National HeartInstitute), Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia from November 1996 to Septem-ber 2001 on patients with duct-dependent pulmonary circulation whounderwent stent implantation. All patients were followed-up until oc-clusion or block occurred or until the end of follow-up time. The evalu-ation consisted of clinical manifestations, electrocardiography, chestx-ray, echocardiography, and cardiac catheterization.Results Stent was successfully implanted in 60 patients (84%),failed in 7 patients (10%) and contra indicated in 4 patients (6%).There was significant improvement on the degree of cyanosis afterstent implantation (p<0.0001). The blood oxygen saturation signifi-cantly increased from 74% (ranged 42-93; SD 12) before proce-dure, to 90% (ranged 62-100; SD 8) afterward (p<0.0001). The meanduration of follow-up time was 14.2 months (ranged 2.5-50.8; SD13) and the minimal patency of PDA was 11.2 months (ranged 1.1-47.7; SD 10.7) after implantation. At the end of follow-up, the stentswere widely patent in 33 patients (55%), stenotic in 15 patients (25%)and spontaneously occluded in 12 patients (20%). There was in-creased growth of pulmonary artery as measured by McGoon ratiofrom 1.23 (ranged 0.4-2.3; SD 0.4) to 1.81 (ranged 0.7-0.9; SD 0.57),and no distortion of pulmonary artery and its branches found.Conclusion Stent implantation into ductus arteriosus decreasedthe degree of cyanosis, increased blood oxygen saturation, main-tained long-term patency of ductus arteriosus, and promoted theincreased growth of pulmonary artery without distortion of pulmo-nary artery and its branches
The relation of BCG vaccination and severe malnutrition with the occurrence of tuberculous meningitis Nofareni, Nofareni; Saing, Bistok; Daulay, Ridwan M.; Lubis, Bidasari
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 44 No 1 (2004): January 2004
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (329.984 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi44.1.2004.12-6

Abstract

Objectives To assess BCG vaccination and nutritional states inchildren with tuberculous meningitis and their relations with theoccurrence of tuberculous meningitis.Methods A case-control study was conducted at the Divisionof Neurology, Department of Child Health, Adam Malik Hospi-tal, Medan, from January 1997 to December 2000. Subjects ofthis study were all tuberculous meningitis patients and primarytuberculosis patients as the control group. Odds ratio (OR) wasused to assess the risk of tuberculous meningitis in patientswith positive BCG vaccination and (1-OR) was used to assessthe efficacy of BCG to prevent tuberculous meningitis.Results Four out of sixteen tuberculous meningitis patients werevaccinated, while 10 of 16 primary tuberculosis patients were vac-cinated (p=0.03). OR of vaccinated patients to get tuberculousmeningitis was 0.2 (95%CI 0.04;0.91). The efficacy of BCG vacci-nation to prevent tuberculous meningitis was 1-0.2 = 0.8. The riskof severe malnourished patients to get tuberculous meningitis was2.33 (95%CI 0.52;10.48; p=0.26).Conclusion Most tuberculous meningitis patients were not BCGvaccinated. Severe malnutrition did not play role in the occurrenceof this disease
Clinical manifestations of childhood asthma persisting until the age of seven Asterina, Rini; Siregar, Sjawitri P; Madiyono, Bambang; Supriyatno, Bambang
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 44 No 1 (2004): January 2004
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (368.738 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi44.1.2004.1-6

Abstract

Background Asthma is a chronic illness commonly found in chil-dren. We aimed to find out the clinical manifestations of childhoodasthma persisting until the age of seven and the influencing factors.Methods A review was performed at the outpatient clinic of theDepartment of Child Health Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital Jakarta,from January 1992 to December 2001, on children with asthmawho still had symptoms until the age of seven.Results During the period of 10 years, there were 322 childrenwith clinical symptoms of asthma persisting until the age of 7. Onehundred and forty-six (45.3%) met the inclusion criteria, consistingof 75 (51.4%) boys and 71 (48.6%) girls. The average age was11.7 years. There were 101 (69.2%) patients with rare episodicasthma, 26.0% with frequent episodic asthma, and 4.8% with per-sistent asthma. Age of onset was mostly beyond 3 year-old (51%).Besides asthma, atopic diseases noted in these patients were al-lergic rhinitis in 85 (58.2%) and atopic dermatitis in 42 (28.8%).Logistic regression found that cigarette smoke exposure (adjustedOR 4.72, 95%CI 2.05;10.87, p=0.000), allergic rhinitis (adjustedOR 3.44, 95%CI 1.40;8.45, p=0.007), and atopic dermatitis (ad-justed OR 2.37, 95%CI 1.01;5.72, p=0.048) had significant asso-ciation with the degree of asthma.Conclusion Of 146 children who still had asthma until the age ofseven, there were 69% with rare episodic asthma, 26% with fre-quent episodic asthma, and 4.8% with persistent asthma. Factorspresumably influencing this manifestations were cigarette smokeexposure, allergic rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis
The effectiveness of chloroquine compared to Fansidar in treating falciparum malaria Azlin, Emil; Batubara, Ichwan HH; Dalimunte, Wisman; Siregar, Charles; Lubis, Bidasari; Lubis, Munar; Pasaribu, Syahril
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 44 No 1 (2004): January 2004
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (329.919 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi44.1.2004.17-20

Abstract

Background The most difficult problem in eradicating malaria isthe resistance of P. falciparum to drugs. Mandailing Natal has thehighest malaria incidence in North Sumatera.Objective This study aimed to investigate the efficacy of chloro-quine and Fansidar in treating falciparum malaria.Methods A randomized double-blind study was done from April toMay 2001. Eighty-three patients with acute uncomplicated P.falciparum malaria infection were randomized into two groups.Group I (35 patients) received chloroquine and group II (48 pa-tients) received Fansidar. Blood examinations were performed onthe 1 st , 2 nd , 7 th , and 28 th days.Results The resistance of P. falciparum to drugs in the chloro-quine group were found in 10 patients with R II and 1 patients withR III, while in the Fansidar group, there were 14 patients with R II.Conclusion The efficacy of chloroquine and Fansidar in treatingfalciparum malaria was not significantly different
Nutritional status of under-five pulmonary tuberculosis patients before and after six-month therapy Sidabutar, Barita; Soedibyo, Soepardi; Tumbelaka, Alan
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 44 No 1 (2004): January 2004
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (323.643 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi44.1.2004.21-4

Abstract

Background Tuberculosis (TB) is a chronic infectious diseasewhich remains a health problem throughout the world including inIndonesia. The implementation of directly observed treatment short-course (DOTS) strategy will hopefully increase patient’s compli-ance, so that a minimum of 85% cure rate could be achieved. Thesuccess in coping with TB disease is expected to become one offactors that play role in providing a solution for malnutrition prob-lems in Indonesia, especially for those caused by TB.Objective The aim of this study was to determine the distributionof nutritional status of under-five TB patients before and after six -month therapy.Methods We reviewed under-five children with pulmonary TB vis-iting the Pediatric Pulmonology Outpatients Clinic of CiptoMangunkusumo Hospital from January 1999 to December 2001.Results Using the weight-for-age (W/A) indices, from 279 patients,the proportion of well-, under-, and severe-malnourished statuswas 36.9%, 60.2%, and 2.9%, respectively, and after 6-monththerapy it became 58.8%, 39.8%, and 1.4%, respectively.Conclusion After 6 months of therapy, the nutritional status of TBpatients increased
The role of indoor air pollution and other factors in the incidence of pneumonia in under-five children Sunyataningkamto, Sunyataningkamto; Z, Iskandar; T, Alan R; I, Budiman; Surjono, Ahmad; Wibowo, Tunjung; Lestari, Endang Dewi; Wastoro, Dwi
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 44 No 1 (2004): January 2004
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (343.443 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi44.1.2004.25-9

Abstract

Background The World Health Organization has asked for a spe-cial attention to the relation between pneumonia and indoor airpollution, i.e., household biomass fuel smoke, cigarette smoke,and mosquito coil smoke, especially in developing countries.Objective To analyze the role of indoor air pollution and otherfactors as risk factors for pneumonia in under-five-year children.Methods This case-control study was carried out from August un-til December 2000 at Public Health Centers in Banjarnegara,Kebumen, Jepara, and Pekalongan districts. All children qualify-ing pneumonia classification as recommended by WHO in IMCI(Integrated Management of Childhood Illness) were defined ascases and without pneumonia as controls. Severe pneumonia andno pneumonia (as classified in IMCI) were excluded. Statisticalanalysis was done using bivariate and logistic regression.Results There were three hundreds and five children with pneu-monia and 289 children without pneumonia. By bivariate analysis,biomass fuel smoke (OR=3.25; 95%CI 1.50;7.07) and cigarettesmoke exposure from other family members (OR=1.63; 95%CI1.11;2.38) were risk factors for pneumonia, while mosquito coilsmoke (OR=1.13; 95%CI 0.79;1.69) was not. History of wheezing(OR=2.60; 95%CI 2.7;8.55), malnutrition (OR=2.60; 95%CI1.33;5.07), and male sex (OR=1.47; 95%CI 1.06;2.04) were otherrisk factors.Conclusions Household biomass fuel smoke and cigarette smokewere risk factors for pneumonia. Other variables as risk factorswere history of wheezing, male sex, and malnutrition
Tourette’s syndrome Dhamayanti, Meita; Riandani, Isabella; Resna, Lelly
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 44 No 1 (2004): January 2004
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (228.946 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi44.1.2004.37-40

Abstract

The aim of this report was to show that mostbehavioral disorders need multidisciplinary manage-ment by behaviorist, neurologist, psychiatrist, psy-chologist and pedagogue, and to give more informa-tion about Tourette’s syndrome so that it can be de-tected earlier. Therefore, children who suffer from itcan live a better life and develop their ability.

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