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Paediatrica Indonesiana
ISSN : 00309311     EISSN : 2338476X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
Paediatrica Indonesiana is a medical journal devoted to the health, in a broad sense, affecting fetuses, infants, children, and adolescents, belonged to the Indonesian Pediatric Society. Its publications are directed to pediatricians and other medical practitioners or researchers at all levels of health practice throughout the world.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 8 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 44 No 3 (2004): May 2004" : 8 Documents clear
Hemolytic anemia in falciparum and vivax malarial patients based on serum bilirubin examination Yusroh, Yoyoh; Lubis, Bidasari; Pasaribu, Syahril; Lubis, Munar; Sembiring, Tiangsa; Adillida, Adillida
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 44 No 3 (2004): May 2004
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (571.454 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi44.3.2004.95-100

Abstract

Objective To examine hemolysis in falciparum and vivax malarialpatients based on serum bilirubin examination.Methods A cross sectional study was conducted on childrenyounger than 15 years of age who visited public health center inthe district of Mandailing Natal with complaints of fever, shivering,pale, jaundice, diarrhea, or headache between April 9 th and April19 th 2001. Variables recorded were age, gender, body weight, bodyheight, symptoms and signs, anti malarial drugs, and laboratorytest results. Thin and thick blood smears were done as diagnostictools of malaria. Thin blood smear was also performed to deter-mine the level of malaria parasites in blood (parasitemia) and toexamine the morphology of red blood cells. Hemolysis was deter-mined by bilirubin examination.Results In P. falciparum malaria, there was a moderate correlation(r=0.68, p<0.0001) between parasitemia and indirect bilirubin con-centration. While in P. vivax malaria, there was only a weak corre-lation (r=0.46, p=0.007) between parasitemia and indirect bilirubinconcentration. It was also found that in falciparum malaria, para-sitemia, total and indirect bilirubin concentrations were significantlyhigher than that in vivax malaria, with p values of 0.009, 0.015 and0.003, respectively.Conclusion Hemolysis in falciparum malaria is more severe thanthat in P. vivax malaria, with marked elevation of indirect bilirubin.The elevation of serum bilirubin correlated with parasitemia
Dermatoglyphic patterns of goitrous children in endemic iodine deficiency area Maddeppungeng, Martira; Satriono, R
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 44 No 3 (2004): May 2004
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (683.896 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi44.3.2004.117-20

Abstract

Background Goiter mapping on elementary school students in1998 showed that the prevalence of endemic goiter was still highat Enrekang regency, South Sulawesi despite various programs tomanage this problem. This raised questions if there were any otherfactors that contribute to the occurrence of goiter e.g. genetic fac-tor, which can be assessed indirectly by dermatoglyphic pattern.Objective To determine the dermatoglyphic pattern in goitrouschildren and compare it to normal children.Methods A cross sectional study was done to investigate the cor-relation between goiter and dermatoglyphic patterns on 115 el-ementary school students at Anggeraja and Baraka subdistricts,Enrekang regency. Dermatoglyphic patterns of finger tips of bothhands and right hallux were scanned using Prolink scanner withMaximum Resolution of 19200x19200dpi and interpreted usingphoto/image editing computer program.Results Seventy two (62.6%) of 115 children were goitrous, sev-enty (97%) were of stage1, and 2 (3%) of stage 2. No significantdifference was found in dermatoglyphic patterns between normaland goitrous children. Tibial loop pattern of the right hallux tendedto be more frequent in goitrous children than that of normal chil-dren, but it was not statistically different (in level of significancy of0.05) compared to normal children (p=0.085).Conclusions This study indicates that the possibility of the role of ge-netic factor in the development of goiter in endemic area is unlikely
Periventricular leucomalacia in premature infants in neonatal ward, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital: A preliminary study Firman, Kemas; Amir, Idham; Kurniati, Nia; Sastroasmoro, Sudigdo
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 44 No 3 (2004): May 2004
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1274.925 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi44.3.2004.122-6

Abstract

Introduction Periventricular leucomalacia (PVL) is a major causeof neurodevelopment delay in premature infants, so early detec-tion of the preterm infant at high risk for the subsequent develop-ment of this lesion is critical.Objectives To determine the prevalence of PVL in premature in-fants hospitalized in neonatal ward, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospi-tal using cranial ultrasound scans and define its characteristicsMethods Premature infants hospitalized in the neonatal ward fromJanuary to July 2003 were included in this study. Clinical featureswere retrieved from medical charts. Ultrasound scan was performedonce, after the age of 7 days and interpretations were read sepa-rately by two consultants of the radiology division.Results Fifty-one infants were included, 21 with <32-week gesta-tion, 30 with >32-week gestation; birth weight range were 1000 to2600 gram. Nineteen infants had cystic lesion and/or dilatation ofthe ventricle from the cranial ultrasound scan. The prevalence ofPVL in gestational age (GA) of <32 weeks was 6/21 and that in GAof >32 weeks was 13/30. Risk factors found in infants with PVLwere maternal infection, respiratory distress, sepsis and circula-tory failure.Conclusion The prevalence of PVL in preterm infants in CiptoMangunkusumo neonatal ward was higher than that was reportedin developed countries. Maternal infection, respiratory distress,sepsis, and circulatory failure which were commonly found in theseinfants were factors to be considered as risks for PVL
Profile of alanine aminotransferase and hepatic iron accumulation in thalassemic patients with or without anti-hepatitis C virus P, Purnamawati S; Kartoyo, Pamela; Chair, Imral; Bisanto, Julfina; Oswari, Hanifah
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 44 No 3 (2004): May 2004
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (331.622 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi44.3.2004.85-9

Abstract

Background Repeated blood transfusions in thalassemic patientscause iron accumulation in tissues and might impair organ func-tion. Other peril of blood transfusion is hepatitis C virus infection.Objectives This study aimed to find out the proportion of increasedalanine aminotransferase (ALT), increased transferrin saturation(TS), and positive anti hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV) among thalas-semic patients and to get the profile of ALT among thalassemicpatients who have increased TS and positive anti-HCV.Methods This cross-sectional descriptive study was conductedon β- and β-HbE-thalassemic patients at the Thalassemia Outpa-tient Clinic, Department of Child Health, Medical School, Univer-sity of Indonesia–Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital in May 2002.Results Subjects were 57 homozygous β-thalassemic and 33 β-HbE-thalassemic patients. No one had regular desferoxamine orhistory of splenectomy. Proportions of increased ALT, TS, and posi-tive anti-HCV were 76%, 78%, and 6%, respectively. Duration ofillness, total volume of packed red cell (PRC) transfusions, TS level,and positive anti-HCV seemed to have role in the increased pro-portion of subjects with increased ALT, whereas duration of illnessand total volume of PRC seemed to have role in the increased TS.Conclusion Factors that seem to have a role in the increasedproportion of subjects who had increased ALT and TS were (1)duration of illness, total volume of PRC transfusion, TS, and posi-tive anti-HCV; 2) duration of illness and total volume of PRC trans-fusion, respectively
Behavior and emotional problems in children with mental retardation Soedjatmiko, Soedjatmiko; Kadim, Muzal; Madiyono, Bambang; Said, Mardjanis
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 44 No 3 (2004): May 2004
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (311.011 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi44.3.2004.90-4

Abstract

Background Behavior and emotional problems in a mentally re-tarded child can inhibit the educational process of the child.Objectives The aims of this study were to find out the prevalenceof behavior and emotional problems in children with mental retar-dation as reported by parents and to assess associated risk fac-tors consisting of mother’s psychopathology, marital discord, malesex, child’s age, socioeconomic status, and family size.Methods This cross sectional study was carried out on 63 chil-dren with mental retardation in a school for retarded children, SLBC Asih Budi I, from January until March 2003. Parents were inter-viewed at school and home using special questionnaires, the ChildBehavior Checklist (CBCL) and Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90).Results The prevalence of behavior and emotional problems inthis study was 52%. The majority of behavior and emotional prob-lems were anxious/depressed (18%) and withdrawn (16%). Malesex and age group of 12-18 year-old were not risk factors of be-havior and emotional problems (OR=0.49, p=0.190 and OR=1.14,p=0.94, respectively) while socioeconomic status, family size, andmother’s psychopathology were risk factors (OR= 4.08, p=0.008;OR=4.17, p=0.014; OR=9.28, p=0.018; respectively). There wasa correlation between behavior and emotional problems of chil-dren and marital discord.Conclusion The prevalence of behavior and emotional problemswas 52% in which the majority was internalizing disorder. Risk fac-tors for behavior and emotional problems were mother’s psycho-pathology, four or more children in the family, low socioeconomicstatus, and marital discord
Knowledge, attitude, and practice of working and non-working mothers concerning immunization of underfive children Ali, Muhammad; Saputra, Ifan Eka; Adillida, Adillida; Sofyani, Sri; Lubis, Iskandar Z
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 44 No 3 (2004): May 2004
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (337.806 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi44.3.2004.101-5

Abstract

Objective To compare the knowledge and attitude of working moth-ers (WM) and non-working mothers (NWM) concerning immuniza-tion in children.Methods A cross sectional study was conducted on February, 18-23, 2002 at PT. Olagafood Industri, a noodle manufacture in TanjungMorawa, Medan. Subjects were female workers and non-workingwives of male workers who had under-five-year children. Motherswere interviewed using a questionnaire. Sample size for each groupwas 38. Degree of knowledge, attitude, and practice concerningimmunization were classified into good, insufficient, and bad.Results Mothers’ age, educational level, and children’s age werecomparable between the two groups. Ten WM and 8 NWM hadgood knowledge concerning immunization, which did not differ sig-nificantly (p>0.05). Good attitude toward immunization was foundin 25 WM and 12 NWM; it was a statistically significant difference(p<0.05). The practice of immunization showed similar result asthe attitude. The age of mothers had a significant relationship withthe degree of knowledge and practice, but not with attitude.Conclusion Degree of knowledge about immunization betweenWM and NWM are comparable, but differences exist in their atti-tude and performance
Association between socioeconomic status and the prevalence of intestinal worm infection in primary school children Ginting, Sri Alemina; Firmansyah, Isra; Putra, Dedi Satria; Aldy, Dachrul; Pasaribu, Syahril; Lubis, Chairuddin P
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 44 No 3 (2004): May 2004
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (316.86 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi44.3.2004.106-10

Abstract

Background In Indonesia, medical problems are indicated bydiseases associated with low socioeconomic status. The preva-lence of intestinal worm is still high in Indonesia.Objective The purpose of this study was to find the associationbetween socioeconomic status and the prevalence of intestinalworm infection.Methods A cross sectional study was done on 120 primary schoolchildren in Suka Village, Karo District, North Sumatra Province.Subjects were selected by means of random sampling. Kato Katzmethod was used in stool examination. Socioeconomic status wasreferred from the Survey Keluarga Sejahtera (Wealth Family Sur-vey) 1998 by the BKKBN (the National Coordination Board onFamily Planning). Data of socioeconomic status were collected byinterview using a questionnaire and analyzed by chi square test; pvalue of <0.05 was considered to be statistically significant.Results Eighty-four subjects (70%) suffered from intestinal worminfection. There was no significant association between either age(p=0.811) or nutritional status (p=0.792) and intestinal worm infec-tion, but there was significant association between sex and intes-tinal worm infection (p=0.028). There was also association betweenintestinal worm infection and father’s education (p=0.044). Mother’soccupation had a significant association with intestinal worm in-fection (p=0.001), but father’s occupation (p=0.474) did not. Nei-ther parents’ income (p=0.429) nor socioeconomic status (p=0.098)was associated with intestinal worm infection.Conclusion There was significant association between intestinalworm infection and sex, father’s education or mother’s occupation
Correlation between parasitemia and spleen size in patients with P. falciparum infection Lailani, Dini; Lubis, Munar; Lubis, Bidasari; Pasaribu, Syahril
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 44 No 3 (2004): May 2004
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (532.687 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi44.3.2004.111-6

Abstract

Background Spleen is an important organ in immunity to malariainfection which is always affected in malaria patients. Enlargementof the spleen is one of the main clinical symptoms of malaria. Levelof parasitemia is related to the risk of complications.Objective To describe the correlation between parasitemia andspleen size in patients with P.falciparum infection.Methods One hundred and four patients including children andadults with fever, pale, jaundice, diarrhea, and headache who vis-ited public health centers in 5 villages in Mandailing Natal, NorthSumatera were enrolled in this study. The diagnosis of malariawas based on blood smears stained by Giemsa method, while thespleen size was measured using Hackett method. Correlation be-tween parasitemia and spleen size was tested by Spearman rankcorrelation.Results Splenomegaly was found in 37 of 104 patients (35.6 %)with the size of H1 in 10.6 %, H2 in 15.4 %, H3 in 9.6 %. The meanparasite count between patients with and without splenomegalywas different, and the difference was significant between patientswith spleen size of H0 and H3. The higher the parasitemia, thebigger the spleen size was (r=0.291; p=0.03).Conclusion There was a correlation between parasitemia andspleen size in falciparum malarial infection

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