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Paediatrica Indonesiana
ISSN : 00309311     EISSN : 2338476X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
Paediatrica Indonesiana is a medical journal devoted to the health, in a broad sense, affecting fetuses, infants, children, and adolescents, belonged to the Indonesian Pediatric Society. Its publications are directed to pediatricians and other medical practitioners or researchers at all levels of health practice throughout the world.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 8 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 44 No 4 (2004): July 2004" : 8 Documents clear
Neurocysticercosis Arimbawa, M; Kari, I Komang; Laksminingsih, N S
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 44 No 4 (2004): July 2004
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (600.766 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi44.4.2004.165-70

Abstract

In this paper we report a case of NCC in an 11-year old Balinese boy.
Delayed puberty in thalassemia major patients Batubara, Jose RL; Akib, Arwin; Pramita, Diah
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 44 No 4 (2004): July 2004
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (418.943 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi44.4.2004.143-7

Abstract

Background Delayed puberty is the most common endocrine com-plication in thalassemia major. The main cause of delayed pu-berty in thalassemia major is the failure of the hypothalamic-pitu-itary axis due to iron accumulation in the pituitary.Objectives The purpose of this study was to determine the preva-lence of delayed puberty in β-thalassemia major patients in theDepartment of Child Health, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital,Jakarta. This study also evaluated the adequacy of chelationtherapy and determined serum gonadotropin and sex hormonelevels in these patients.Methods Seventy-two patients with β-thalassemia major aged 13-18 years old who visited the Thalassemia Outpatient Clinic of CiptoMangunkusumo Hospital during February-July 2003 were includedin the study. Each subject underwent examinations to determinethe body weight and height, pubertal status, serum iron level, totaliron binding capacity, and the levels of serum LH, FSH, estradiol(in girls) or testosterone (in boys).Results Delayed puberty occurred in 40 of 72 patients (56%). Themajority of patients with delayed puberty showed low levels of se-rum LH, estradiol, and testosterone whereas low levels of serumFSH only occurred in 6 of 21 boys and 11 of 19 girls. Most of thepatients without delayed puberty had normal levels of serum LH,FSH, and estradiol, but 8 of 16 boys showed decreased serumtestosterone levels. Only 3 patients used chelation therapy ad-equately, all of them showed normal puberty.Conclusions The prevalence of delayed puberty in β-thalassemiamajor patients in this study was still high (56%). Periodic examina-tion and recording of pubertal stage need to be done in girls whohave reached 8 years old and boys who have reached 9 years oldso that early detection and management of delayed puberty canbe done.
Factors associated with the transmission of soil-transmitted helminthiasis among schoolchildren Firmansyah, Isra; Ginting, Sri Alemina; Lubis, Munar; Lubis, Iskandar Z; Pasaribu, Syahril; Lubis, Chairuddin P
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 44 No 4 (2004): July 2004
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (415.354 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi44.4.2004.127-32

Abstract

Background Soil-transmitted helminthiasis (STH) is an importantpublic health problem in Indonesia.Objective To find out factors influencing the transmission of STHin two different communities in North Sumatera, Indonesia.Methods A cross sectional study was done on 96 primary schoolchildren in Suka village (located on a mountain area) and 96 pri-mary school children in Pantai Cermin village (a coastal area). Sub-jects were recruited by simple random sampling. Kato Katz andcentrifuge floatation methods were used for stool and soil exami-nations, respectively. Data were collected by interviewing parentsof children using a questionnaire and were analyzed using chi–square test by SPSS program version 11.0.Results There was no difference in the prevalence of STH in bothvillages (p>0.05). Parents’ knowledge and economic status hadsignificant relationships with the prevalence of STH in Suka vil-lage (p<0.05), but not in Pantai Cermin (p>0.05). In both villages,parents’ education did not have a significant relation with STH,while there were significant relations between STH and hygiene,environment, or soil contamination by worm eggs (p<0.05).Conclusion There were significant relationships between hygiene,environment, or soil contamination and the prevalence of STH inthe two villages.
The effect of vitamin A supplementation on morbidity due to Plasmodium falciparum Adillida, Adillida; Yusroh, Yoyoh; Lubis, Munar; Lubis, Bidasari; Sembiring, Tiangsa; Pasaribu, Syahril
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 44 No 4 (2004): July 2004
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (323.416 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi44.4.2004.133-7

Abstract

Objective To investigate the effect of vitamin A supplementationon malaria morbidity.Methods The study was a randomized double-blind placebo-con-trolled trial, conducted in Panyabungan, Mandailing Natal, NorthSumatera from April 2001 to April 2002. Children aged 6-60 monthssuffering from falciparum malaria were randomly assigned to highdose vitamin A or placebo every 4 months for a year. All childrenwere treated in accordance with health center policy. Malaria mor-bidity was assessed from health center visit due to fever, diarrhea,cough, or abdominal pain. Parents gave reports if their child re-ceived malaria treatment from other health centers.Results The number of febrile episodes (probable malaria illness)was lower in the treatment group than that of control, but not sig-nificant. The parasitemia was not different between both groups.There was a significant difference in spleen enlargement betweenthe treatment group and control (p=0.04). There was no differencein health center visit between the two groups.Conclusion The findings suggest that vitamin A supplementationhas only effect on spleen enlargement in malaria.
Bowel habits of exclusively breastfed 0-4 month-old babies Tehuteru, Edi S; Firmansyah, Agus; Madiyono, Bambang
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 44 No 4 (2004): July 2004
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (392.983 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi44.4.2004.138-42

Abstract

Background Exclusively breastfed newborns have frequent bowelmovements and sometimes watery stool, which parents or doctorsmight think as diarrhea.Objective The aim of this study was to observe the bowel habitsof exclusively breastfed infants.Methods A longitudinal study was done on 100 babies born be-tween November and December 2002 in Cinta Kasih MaternityHospital. The inclusion criteria were fullterm baby, exclusivelybreastfed for 4 months, and informed consent from parents. Ba-bies with problems in organ or nerve that influenced the gastrointes-tinal tract were excluded. Stool frequency, consistency, and colorwere observed.Results The mean stool frequency per day were 3 times in the 1 stweek (95%CI 2.6;3.4), 2 times in the 2 nd week (95%CI 1.7;2.3),1.8 times in the 3 rd week (95%CI 1.5;2.1), and 1.5 times in the 4 thweek (95%CI 1.3;1.7). In the second and third month, it was 1.4times a day and the fourth month, 1.2 times a day. The consis-tency of meconium was soft in the first four days. After that, 18% ofbabies had watery stool, which increased to 30% on day 15-113.In the last week of the fourth month, all babies had soft stool. Meco-nium was black and lasted for 1-3 days. On the fourth day, thestool became yellow. On day 5-14, 6% of babies had green stool,which increased to 12% on day 15-120.Conclusion The first week of the first month was the week whenthe stool frequency was highest compared to the weeks or monthsafter. The consistency of meconium was soft. After it disappeared,most babies had soft stool. Eighteen up to 30% percent of babieshad watery stool. Regarding the color, meconium was black andstayed for 1-3 days. After that, most babies had yellow stool and 6-12% had green stool
Profile of children with increased intracranial pressure on mannitol treatment Teddy, Sander D; Latief, Abdul; Madiyono, Bambang
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 44 No 4 (2004): July 2004
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (304.86 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi44.4.2004.148-52

Abstract

Background Early recognition of increased intracranial pressure(IIP) and well-monitored management are determining indicatorsfor treatment outcome. As far as we know, data of children with IIPon mannitol treatment has not been available.Objective To elicit the profile of IIP patients who received mannitolat the Department of Child Health, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital,Jakarta.Methods This was a cross-sectional study. Data were obtainedfrom medical records of patients with increased intracranial pres-sure who received mannitol at the Department of Child Health,Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta between July 2001 to Oc-tober 2003Results Fifty-four IIP patients with mannitol treatment were included.Forty-two (78%) were under-five years old. Thirty-six subjects (67%)were boys; 30 (56%) were undernourished. Central nervous systeminfections (meningitis and encephalitis) were the most frequent causesof IIP. Most of the head CT scan revealed cerebral edema, hydroceph-alus, and cerebral hemorrhage. Fifty subjects (93%) had decline of con-sciousness; most of them were somnolent. Improvement in conscious-ness was identified in 31 subjects, in which 21 subjects reached fullconsciousness. Vomiting, which was found in 25 subjects (46%), sub-sided after mannitol administration. Behavioral changes were found in49 subjects (91%); 32 subjects still had persistent behavioral changesafter mannitol administration. Large and protruding fontanel was foundin 7/22 subjects, cerebral nerve paralysis in 23 subjects (43%) andpapillary edema in 6 of 34 subjects who underwent funduscopy. Duringthe treatment with mannitol, fever was found in 5 subjects, vomiting in 2subjects, skin edema and tachycardia each in 1 subject. Metabolic aci-dosis was found in 6/13 subjects, hyponatremia and hypokalemia in 16and 13 out of 30 subjects respectively. Death occurred in 9 subjects(17%).Conclusion In IIP patients, the administration of mannitol has atendency to improve consciousness, vomiting, and behavioral orpersonality changes. The high incidence rate of electrolyte imbal-ances and metabolic acidosis during the treatment indicated theneed of periodic monitoring to detect early disorders.
Adverse events following immunization (AEFI) reports of extended program immunization (EPI) in Indonesia during 1998-2002 Kaswandani, Nastiti; Hadinegoro, Sri Rezeki; Suradi, Rulina
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 44 No 4 (2004): July 2004
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (458.4 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi44.4.2004.153-9

Abstract

Background The incidence of adverse events following immuni-zation (AEFI) increased in correlation with the number of vaccinedoses. Meanwhile AEFI reports should be managed properly tomaintain the compliance and immunization coverage.Objectives The aims of this study were to investigate the inci-dence and profile of AEFI, its onset, severity, classification, andoutcome.Methods This study was a passive surveillance of AEFI reportsreceived by the National Committee on AEFI, Ministry of Health ofIndonesia, during 1998 to 2002.Results Two hundreds and four AEFI cases were reported; 4 casesas zero reports, 182 cases as individual reports, and 18 clusterreports. The AEFI incidence was 0.44 per 1 million doses of vac-cines. Vaccine reaction rate was 1 per 2.3 million vaccine doses.The most common vaccines reported as the causes of AEFI wereDTP, Polio, and TT. Among 182 reported cases, local or mild AEFIreactions were observed in 45, moderate in 49, and severe in 88.Based on WHO field classification, this study reported that 84 casesbelonged to coincidence, 72 to vaccine reactions, 13 to program-matic errors, 7 to injection reactions, and 6 to unclassified reac-tions. Forty-seven patients died, 12 had some sequelae, and 123completely recovered. Meanwhile, among the death cases, 70%occurred coincidently, 17% due to vaccine reactions, and 6 wereunclassified.Conclusions The incidence of AEFI in the extended program im-munization (EPI) in Indonesia during the period of 1998-2002 were182 cases, thus vaccine reaction rate was 1 per 2.3 million vac-cine doses. The most common vaccine which caused AEFI wasDTP. Most AEFI with severe symptoms happened in 4-24 hoursafter immunization.
Rett syndrome in childhood: the clinical characteristics Herini, E S; Mangunatmadja, Irawan; Solek, Purboyo; Pusponegoro, Hardiono D
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 44 No 4 (2004): July 2004
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (689.964 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi44.4.2004.160-4

Abstract

The prevalence rate of RS in various coun-tries is from 1:10,000 to 1:23,000 female livebirths. RS is most often misdiagnosed as autism,cerebral palsy, or non-specific developmental de-lay. While many health professionals may not befamiliar with RS, it is a relatively frequent cause ofneurological dysfunction in females. There are nobiological markers for this disease, the diagno-sis is established by history taking and clinical find-ings. We reported two patients, both girls, with RS.

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