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Paediatrica Indonesiana
ISSN : 00309311     EISSN : 2338476X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
Paediatrica Indonesiana is a medical journal devoted to the health, in a broad sense, affecting fetuses, infants, children, and adolescents, belonged to the Indonesian Pediatric Society. Its publications are directed to pediatricians and other medical practitioners or researchers at all levels of health practice throughout the world.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 8 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 45 No 1 (2005): January 2005" : 8 Documents clear
Nutritional status and nutrient intake from complementary foods among breastfed children in Purworejo District, Central Java, Indonesia Lestari, Endang Dewi; Hartini, T Ninuk S; Hakimi, M; Surjono, A
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 45 No 1 (2005): January 2005
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (607.906 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi45.1.2005.31-9

Abstract

Background The growth rate of Indonesian infants beyond sixmonths of age declines compared with that of the internationalreference population.Objective This study aimed to describe the pattern of nutritionalstatus among breastfed children and their intake of energy, pro-tein, and zinc from complementary foods in Purworejo District, Cen-tral Java, Indonesia.Methods The study was a cross sectional survey drawing breastfedchildren under 24 months old from a well-defined population. Chil-dren with a history of prematurity or low birth weight were excluded.Anthropometrical measurements were collected. Intake of comple-mentary food was assessed using 24-hour recall. Analysis of nu-tritional intake was only performed in 11-23 month-old children.Results Of 577 children enrolled, the prevalence of underweight,stunting, and wasting were 8.1%, 8.8%, and 4.6%, respectively.The prevalence of undernutrition increased with age. There wasno association between frequency of breastfeeding during 24 hoursin the second year of life and the nutritional status. The averageintake of energy, protein, and zinc from complementary foods wasvery low i.e., 30%, 45%, and 5% of the Indonesian recommendeddietary allowance (RDA), respectively.Conclusion The prevalence of undernutrition in breastfed chil-dren increases with age. The breastfed children beyond 11 monthsof age in Purworejo District need sufficient density of nutrients fromcomplementary foods.
Blood glucose levels in healthy, term, appropriate for gestational age, exclusively breastfed infants Hewis, Lineus; Suradi, Rulina; Tambunan, Taralan
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 45 No 1 (2005): January 2005
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (477.125 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi45.1.2005.7-13

Abstract

Objective This study aimed to determine blood glucose levels ofhealthy, term, appropriate for gestational age (AGA), exclusivelybreastfed infants at the age of 6, 12, 24, 48, and 72 hours of life,and to investigate the incidence of hypoglycemia in those infants.Methods All healthy, term, AGA infants born in CiptoMangunkusumo General Hospital, Jakarta, who were exclusivelybreastfed during the recruitment period of December 2003 untilFebruary 2004, were included in this study. These infants weresubjected to blood glucose level determination at the age of 6, 12,24, 48, or 72 hours of life, and the clinical signs of hypoglycemiawere monitored.Results Two hundred and fifteen blood samples taken from 137newborns were studied. There was no incidence of hypoglycemiaobserved, whether symptomatic or asymptomatic. The range ofblood glucose levels was between 41 mg/dl and 115 mg/dl. Themeans and the standard deviations (SD) of the blood glucose lev-els of the 6-, 12-, 24-, 48- and 72-hour old infants were 59.7 (11.98)mg/dl, 64.1 (13.51) mg/dl, 65.9 (14.42) mg/dl, 67.0 (14.95) mg/dl,and 78.6 (16.51) mg/dl, respectively.Conclusions The current concern for hypoglycemia in the popu-lation of healthy, term, AGA, exclusively breastfed infants duringthe first few days of life was not proven to exist. Therefore, there isno reason to resort to prelacteal feeding in such infants
Characteristics and risk factors of snoring and the prevalence of suspected obstructive sleep apnea in children Supriyatno, Bambang; Deviani, Rusmala; Tumbelaka, Alan R; Ifran, Evita KB; Rahajoe, Nastiti N
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 45 No 1 (2005): January 2005
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (412.231 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi45.1.2005.40-5

Abstract

Background Snoring as a consequence of upper airway obstruc-tion is common in children. Snoring can be considered as normal,but might also reflect a disease such as obstructive sleep apnea(OSA), which is associated with serious morbidities. In Indonesia,data on the characteristics and risk factors of snoring and obstruc-tive sleep apnea is limitedObjectives The aims of this study were to find out the character-istics and risk factors of snoring in children and to determine theprevalence of suspected OSA in snoring children.Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out on children aged5-13 years using parental questionnaires scored according to theBrouilette formula. All children underwent physical examination forweight, height and tonsil size. Adenoid radiology was performedon part of the samples.Results Of the 917 questionnaires distributed, only 658 were com-pleted. The ratio of boys to girls was equal. Obesity was detectedin 18.3% of children, among whom 54.2% snored. Obese childrenwere 2.1 times more likely to snore. Besides obesity, rhinitis andatopy were found to be associated with snoring (PR= , 95%CI ;and PR= , 95%CI ; respectively). Asthma and tonsil hypertrophywere shown not to be predisposing factors of snoring. Childrenwith adenoid hypertrophy were 1.8 times more likely to snore ha-bitually. The prevalence of snoring and suspected OSA in childrenaged 5-13 years were 31.6% and 5.9%, respectively.Conclusion Risk factors of snoring were obesity, adenoid hyper-trophy, atopy and rhinitis. Prevalence of snoring in children age 5-13 years was 31.6% and that of suspected OSA cases was 5.9%.
Comparison of pulmonary functions of thalassemic and of healthy children Said, Mardjanis; Sastroasmoro, Sudigdo; Gatot, Djajadiman; Supriyatno, Bambang; Ananta, Yovita
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 45 No 1 (2005): January 2005
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (411.462 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi45.1.2005.1-6

Abstract

Objectives The aim of this study was to compare some pulmo-nary functions of thalassemic patients and those of normal chil-dren. Factors correlated with lung dysfunction were assessed.Methods This cross-sectional study compared some pulmonaryfunctions of thalassemic patients with those of healthy children.The study was performed in the Department of Child Health, CiptoMangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia. Pre- and post-trans-fusion hemoglobin levels of the thalassemic subjects were deter-mined. Other data such as chelation therapy and serum ferritinlevels were also obtained. Both thalassemic and control subjectsunderwent routine physical examinations and lung function testsusing an electronic spirometer. Spirometry was repeated threetimes for each subject, and only the best result was recorded.Results Sixty-three thalassemic patients were enrolled, consist-ing of 32 male and 31 female subjects. Healthy subjects consistedof 31 males and 31 females. Most thalassemic patients (46/63)were found to have lung function abnormalities. This was signifi-cantly different from control subjects, of whom most (39/62) hadnormal lung function. Restrictive lung function abnormality was themost common (42/63) observation documented. Serum ferritin lev-els were obtained from 28 male and 29 female thalassemic sub-jects. There was no correlation between percentage from predictedforced vital capacity and serum ferritin levels, whether in male(r=0.191; P=0.967) or female (r =-0.076, P=0.695) thalassemicsubjects.Conclusion Thalassemic patients have significantly lower lungfunction than healthy children. More thalassemic patients had lungfunction abnormalities compared to healthy children. Restrictivedysfunction was the most common finding in the thalassemic group.No correlation was found between lung function and serum ferritinlevels
The influence of oral cimetidine administration on creatinine clearance in chilren with chronic renal failure: A preliminary study Roeslani, Rosalina D; Trihono, Partini P; Harun, Sri Rezeki
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 45 No 1 (2005): January 2005
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (356.156 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi45.1.2005.14-7

Abstract

Background Serum creatinine and creatinine clearance are usedto assess glomerular filtration rate but have a major disadvantagesince a variable amount of creatinine is secreted in the proximaltubule. This may cause an unpredictable overestimation of GFR.Tubular creatinine secretion can be blocked by cimetidine throughcompetitive inhibition of cation transport in the proximal tubularluminal membrane.Objective Cimetidine administration might improve the reliabilityof creatinine as a marker of glomerular filtration.Methods A preliminary study with a one-group pretest-posttestdesign in 11 children with chronic renal failure. Serum cystatin Clevel as reference value was compared with creatinine clearancemeasured before and after oral ingestion of cimetidine. The doseof cimetidine was adjusted with the GFR using Schwartz formula.Statistical evaluation was done with the Wilcoxon signed rankstest.Result The mean creatinine clearance before cimetidine adminis-tration was 27.4 (SD 14.6) ml/minute/1.73 m 2 BSA, and decreasedafter cimetidine to 21.1 (SD 13,1) ml/minute/1.73 m 2 BSA (p=0.015).Conclusion Oral cimetidine was effective in inhibiting creatininetubular secretion. This study could not prove that cimetidine im-proves the accuracy of creatinine clearance
Cyclophosphamide in frequent-relapsing or steroid-dependent nephrotic syndrome: Review of 38 patients Iriani, Yulia; Tambunan, Taralan; Sastroasmoro, Sudigdo
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 45 No 1 (2005): January 2005
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (475.6 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi45.1.2005.18-23

Abstract

Background Steroid-sensitive nephrotic syndrome (SSNS) in chil-dren is characterized by relapsing courses in a substantial propor-tion of affected individuals. Children with frequent-relapsing neph-rotic syndrome (FRNS) or steroid-dependent nephrotic syndrome(SDNS) are at risk of severe steroid toxicity and need individual-ized treatment. Previous studies have elucidated that cyclophos-phamide (CPA) reduced the risk of relapses and increased thelength of subsequent remissions in children with relapsing SSNS.Methods This retrospective study evaluated 38 patients (26 FRNSand 12 SDNS) after cyclophosphamide therapy to elucidate theefficacy of CPA in FRNS or SDNS in the Department of Child Health,Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital. All patients were treated with CPA(2 mg/kg per day) for 8 weeks, in combination with prednisone.Results The median (range) duration of follow up was 45 months(24-140 months) for FRNS and 29 months (24-63 months) forSDNS. The mean relapse rate one year prior to CPA therapy inFRNS and SDNS were 3.8 relapses/year (95%CI 3.4; 4.2) and 4.0relapses/year (95%CI 3.3; 4.7), which were reduced to 1.6 relapses/year (95% CI 1.1; 2.1) and 2.3 relapses/year (95%CI 1.5;3.2), re-spectively. The overall rate of cumulative sustained good response(complete remission or infrequent relapses) was 65% after 36months. Frequent relapsing versus steroid-dependent status wassignificantly correlated with rate of sustained good response after36 months (85% versus 15%) with OR=23 (95%CI 3.1;225.2).Conclusion The efficacy of cyclophosphamide therapy in themanagement of FRNS is better than in SDNS
Association between soil-transmitted helminthiasis and hemoglobin concentration in primary school children Angraini, Rita; Dimyati, Y; Lubis, Bidasari; Pasaribu, Syahril; Lubis, Chairuddin P
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 45 No 1 (2005): January 2005
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (587.282 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi45.1.2005.24-30

Abstract

Objectives To determine the association between intestinal hel-minthiasis and hemoglobin (Hb) concentration and to observe theeffect of single dose albendazole treatment on Hb concentration.Methods An experimental study was carried out from March toJuly 2002 on primary school children at Suka Village, Tiga PanahSubdistrict, Karo Regency, North Sumatera Province. From 366children who suffered from helminthiasis, 113 were selected assubjects by simple random sampling. Subjects were treated with asingle oral dose of 400 mg albendazole. Hb concentration wasexamined using the cyanide method twice i.e., prior to and threemonths after treatment with albendazole.Results It was found that among 113 subjects, the prevalences ofAscaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, and mixed infestation were18.3%, 40.4%, and 41.3%, respectively, while the prevalence ofanemia was 33.0%. There was no significant difference in age,gender, nutritional status, and mean Hb concentration betweenchildren suffering from the different types of worm infestation(P>0.05). For each type of infestation, there were significant differ-ences in mean Hb concentration and anemia prevalence beforeand after treatment (P<0.05).Conclusions There was no difference between the Hb concen-trations of children suffering from Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuristrichiura, and mixed-type worm infestations. Single dose 400 mgalbendazole was beneficial in increasing Hb concentration andreducing the occurrence of anemia
Japanese encephalitis in children Masloman, Nurhayati; Widarso, H S; Cicilia, W
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 45 No 1 (2005): January 2005
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (204.042 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi45.1.2005.46-8

Abstract

Japanese encephalitis is a zoonotic disease causedby Japanese encephalitis virus, attacking domesticanimals, mainly pigs and birds. It is transmittedto humans by mosquito bites, namely Culextritaeniorhyncus.

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