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Paediatrica Indonesiana
ISSN : 00309311     EISSN : 2338476X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
Paediatrica Indonesiana is a medical journal devoted to the health, in a broad sense, affecting fetuses, infants, children, and adolescents, belonged to the Indonesian Pediatric Society. Its publications are directed to pediatricians and other medical practitioners or researchers at all levels of health practice throughout the world.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 8 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 45 No 4 (2005): July 2005" : 8 Documents clear
The risk for delayed development in low birth weight, appropriate for gestational age preterm infants Peryoga, Stanza Uga; Sukadi, Abdurachman; Wiradisuria, Sambas
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 45 No 4 (2005): July 2005
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi45.4.2005.154-9

Abstract

Background Preterm infants, particularly those who have hadsevere asphyxia, hyperbilirubinemia, and sepsis, tend to be at riskfor neurodevelopmental impairment.Objective The purpose of this study was to assess the risk for de-layed development in low birth weight (LBW), appropriate for gesta-tional age (AGA) preterm infants compared to that in term, non-LBWinfants, and to investigate the roles of severe asphyxia, sepsis, andhyperbilirubinemia as potential risk factors for delayed development.Methods This was a hospital-based retrospective cohort studyinvolving preterm, LBW and term, non-LBW infants conducted inHasan Sadikin Hospital, Bandung. The Bayley InfantNeurodevelopmental Screener (BINS) test was performed to as-sess the risk of delayed development at 3 months of corrected agefor the preterm infants and at 3 months of chronological age for theterm infants. Bivariate analysis using the chi-square test and mul-tivariate analysis using logistic regression were performed.Results One hundred and twelve infants fulfilled eligibility criteria,consisting of 52 preterm, LBW and 60 term, non-LBW infants. Basedon the BINS test, of the preterm, LBW infants, 32 (61%) were atlow risk, 11 (21%) at moderate risk, and 9 (17%) at high risk fordelayed development. Of the control infants, 49 (82%) were at lowrisk, 10 (17%) at moderate risk, and 1 (1.7%) at high risk for de-layed development. Logistic regression analysis showed signifi-cant association between accompanying diseases such as sepsis(OR=25.60; P=0.001) and hyperbilirubinemia (OR=16.07; P=0.001)with delayed development. Despite more than twofold odds fordelayed development in infants with severe asphyxia (OR=2.51)and LBW-prematurity (OR=2.47), the association was statisticallyinsignificant (P=0.20 and P=0.15, respectively).Conclusions In preterm infants appropriate for gestational age,prematurity and low birth weight alone may or may not predisposeto delayed development at 3 months of age. However, the risk fordelayed development in such infants is increased when sepsis orhyperbilirubinemia is present
Association between hepatitis C infection and number of screened blood unit transfusions in thalassemic children Wulandari, Diah Asri; Martiza, Iesje; Alfa, Yasmar; Prasetyo, Dwi
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 45 No 4 (2005): July 2005
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi45.4.2005.182-6

Abstract

Background Donor blood screening test for antibody againsthepatitis C virus (HCV) by third generation ELISA is widely used.However, there is still a window period during which a donor mayalready be infected despite a negative screening test.Objectives To determine the prevalence of hepatitis C infection inthalassemic children who had received screened donor blood andto seek the association between HCV infection and the number ofblood unit transfusions received.Methods This was an analytic cross-sectional study. Sixty-sevenchildren who had received third generation ELISA screened donorblood were examined for HCV antibody. The study was conductedin Hasan Sadikin General Hospital, Bandung, from January toMarch 2004. The prevalence of hepatitis C was presented in per-centage. The association between HCV infection and sex, age,interval between transfusions, and the number of blood unit trans-fusions received was determined by univariate analysis and logis-tic regression analysis.Results In univariate analysis, significant difference between HCV-infected and uninfected subjects was found in the mean age andmean number of blood units transfused (P<0.001). In logistic re-gression analysis, we found a significant association between thequantity of transfused blood with positive HCV antibody (P<0.001).The odds ratio for positive HCV antibody was 1.08 for each bloodunit transfusion received (95%CI 1.02;1.14). The prevalence ofhepatitis C in thalassemic children who received third generationELISA screened blood was 22.4% (95%CI 12.4%;32.4%). Thisprevalence is lower than that in a previous study of thalassemicchildren receiving unscreened blood (50.8%).Conclusions The prevalence of HCV infection in thalassemic chil-dren who had received screened donor blood is 22.4%. HCV in-fection is significantly associated with the number of screened bloodunit transfusions
The risk of early-onset neonatal sepsis in preterm infants with maternal histologic chorioamnionitis Adnyana, IGK Winata; Soetjiningsih, Soetjiningsih
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 45 No 4 (2005): July 2005
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi45.4.2005.160-5

Abstract

Background Chorioamnionitis, usually a subclinical condition, maycause preterm delivery and long-term morbidity.Objective The objective of this study was to determine the risk ofearly-onset neonatal sepsis in preterm infants with maternal histo-logic chorioamnionitis (HCA).Methods This was a prospective cohort study of preterm infantsborn at Sanglah Hospital, Denpasar from September 2002 to Feb-ruary 2004. Histopathological examinations of the subjects’ placen-tas were done and the infants were monitored for 72 hours for clini-cal signs of early-onset neonatal sepsis. Maternal and neonatal riskfactors were analyzed using multivariate statistical analysis.Results Eighty-two preterm infants were included, of which 41 werepositive for maternal HCA. Twenty-five (61%) of the infants posi-tive for maternal HCA developed early-onset neonatal sepsis, com-pared to 5 (12%) of those negative for maternal HCA (RR=5, 95%CI2.12;11.78). Nine infants died from early onset neonatal sepsis.Eight of them had positive HCA, and only one had negative HCA.The average length of hospital stay between infants with and with-out maternal HCA did not differ significantly [12.0 (SD 5.08) vs.12.6 (SD 1.34); P=0.80]. Logistic regression model analysis iden-tified only HCA as a significant risk factor for early-onset neonatalsepsis (OR=6.9, 95%CI 2.0;23). Gestational age (OR=1.3, 95%CI0.8;2.0), birth weight (OR=1.0, 95%CI 0.9;1.0), and neonatal as-phyxia (OR=1.0, 95%CI 0.1;4.4) were not found to be significantrisk factors.Conclusion Preterm infants with maternal histologicchorioamnionitis are at a higher risk for developing early-onsetneonatal sepsis
Specific immunotherapy for allergic diseases Harsono, Ariyanto
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 45 No 4 (2005): July 2005
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi45.4.2005.137-44

Abstract

Specific allergen immunotherapy (SIT)involves the administration of allergenextracts to modify or abolish symptomsassociated with atopic allergy. The process isspecific, in that the treatment is targeted at thoseallergens recognized by the patient and physician asresponsible for symptoms. A decision to use SITtherefore demands a careful assessment of the patient’scondition and the role of allergic triggers.Immunotherapy was first developed at St Mary’sHospital, London at the end of the 19th century, andmany of the basic principles remain valid today.
Practices of growth assessment in children: Is anthropometric measurement important? Batubara, Jose RL
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 45 No 4 (2005): July 2005
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi45.4.2005.145-53

Abstract

Assessing and monitoring growth iscommon practice in pediatric care, andhealth professionals accept routine growthmonitoring in children as a standardcomponent of community child health servicesthroughout the world. In clinical level, by theseactivities one can detect and intervene while growthfaltering happens. The internationally recommendedway to assess malnutrition at population level is to takeanthropometric measurements. In developedcountries, growth monitoring is an intrinsic part of‘well child’ clinics. As growth is a proxy for childhealth, the child who grows well is generally healthyand illness in a child is usually associated with poorgrowth. Interpretation of child growth is based onanthropometric indicators established in a referencepopulation with cut-off points to differentiate under-and overnutrition, short stature or tall stature,proportionate or disproportionate growth. Practicesof growth monitoring consist of regularly measuringthe weight and height of children, then plotting theinformation on a growth chart to make abnormalgrowth visible. When growth is abnormal, the healthworker does something in concert with the family andas a result of these actions the child receivesappropriate social or medical support, his or hernutrition improves, or a serious condition is diagnosedearlier.
Nutritional status changes in children with malignant solid tumor before and after chemotherapy Januar, Boris; Nasar, Sri S; Suradi, Rulina; Abdulsalam, Maria
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 45 No 4 (2005): July 2005
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi45.4.2005.166-70

Abstract

Background Although aggressive multimodal treatment programsin childhood cancer have significantly increased survival rates, themorbidity caused by protein energy malnutrition related to therapyis still high.Objective To describe nutritional status changes in children withmalignant solid tumors after 21 days of chemotherapy.Methods A descriptive prospective study with pre- and post-testdesign in children with malignant solid tumors was conducted inthe Department of Child Health, Medical School University of In-donesia/Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta between Janu-ary and July 2004. Anthropometrics (body weight, BW and mid-upper-arm circumference, MUAC) and serum albumin measure-ments were performed before and after 21 days of chemotherapy.Results Twenty-two children were enrolled in this study. After 21days of chemotherapy, 8 children had decreased BW and 6 chil-dren had decreased MUAC, but 3 children gained weight and hadincreased MUAC. Based on MUAC-for-age, 7 children had de-creased nutritional status. Fifteen children had reduced serum al-bumin levels based on a 10% cut-off point. The number of childrenwho had reduced serum albumin was larger than those who hadreduced BW and MUAC. In the evaluation of average oral foodconsumption during 21 days, 7 out of 16 children could acceptmore than 2/3 portion of served food. All of the children who re-ceived enteral feeding could accept more than 2/3 portion of servedfood.Conclusion There was a decrease of nutritional status, BW,MUAC, and serum albumin in most of the subjects after chemo-therapy. Serum albumin level measurement was the more sensi-tive parameter in determining nutritional status changes. Enteralfeeding seems more appropriate to fulfill nutritional needs than oralfeeding
The impact of obesity on left ventricular mass and left ventricular systolic function in children Nova, Ria; Madiyono, Bambang; Sastroasmoro, Sudigdo; Sjarif, Damayanti R
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 45 No 4 (2005): July 2005
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi45.4.2005.171-6

Abstract

Background Obesity causes cardiovascular disturbances. Theincidence of cardiovascular disease is higher even in mildly obesepatients than in lean subjects.Objectives The purpose of this study was to compare left ven-tricular (LV) mass, LV internal dimensions, and LV systolic func-tion between obese and normal children; and to determine the as-sociation of the degree of obesity with LV mass and LV systolicfunction.Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted on elemen-tary school students in Jakarta from February to April 2003. Wemeasured the subjects’ body weight and height, and performedlipid profile and echocardiography examinations. Measurementsof LV mass, LV internal dimensions with regard to septum thick-ness, LV internal diameter, and LV posterior wall thickness; andLV systolic function as indicated by shortening fraction and ejec-tion fraction, were performed echocardiographically. The differ-ences in measurements between obese and normal children aswell as between obese children with and without lipid abnormalitywere analyzed. The correlation between the degree of obesity withLV size and systolic function was determined.Results Twenty-eight normal children and 62 obese children wereenrolled in the study. Mean LV mass was 35.7 (SD 5.16) g/cm 3 inobese children versus 24.0 (SD 3.80) g/cm 3 in normal children(P<0.0001). Mean septum thickness was 0.8 (SD 0.14) mm inobese children versus 0.6 (SD 7.90) mm in normal children (P<0.0001). Mean posterior wall thickness was 0.9 (SD 0.14) mm inobese children versus 0.6 (SD 9.97) mm in normal children(P<0.0001). Mean LV internal diameter was 4.0 (SD 0.34) mm inobese children versus 3.9 (SD 0.29) mm in normal children(P=0.300). There was strong correlation between the degree ofobesity and LV mass (r=0.838, P<0.0001). LV systolic function(shortening fraction) was 37.1 (SD 4.20) percent in obese childrenversus 35.8 (SD 4.99) percent in normal children (P=0.19). Ejec-tion fraction was 67.4 (SD 5.32) percent in obese children versus65.5 (SD 6.29) percent in normal children (P=0.13). There wasweak correlation between LV systolic function and the degree ofobesity (shortening fraction r=0.219, P=0.038; ejection fractionr=0.239, P=0.023).Conclusions Obese children had significantly greater LV mass,septum thickness, and posterior wall thickness than normal chil-Backgrounddren. Such significant difference was absent for LV internal diam-eter and measures of LV systolic function. There was no signifi-cant difference in LV mass and LV systolic function between obesechildren with or without abnormality of lipid profile. A strong corre-lation exists between the degree of obesity and LV mass, but thecorrelation between degree of obesity and LV systolic function wasweak
The prevalence of factor VIII inhibitor in patients with severe hemophilia-A and its clinical characteristics Harijadi, Harijadi; Gatot, Djajadiman; Akib, Arwin AP
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 45 No 4 (2005): July 2005
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi45.4.2005.177-81

Abstract

Background Hemophilia is a hereditary blood-clotting disorderdue to factor VIII deficiency. Up to this date, the administration offactor VIII in preventing and managing bleeding has been the maintreatment. One of the complications, which may occur due to re-peated administrations of factor VIII, is the formation of factor VIIIantibody (factor VIII inhibitor).Objective To find out the prevalence of severe hemophilia-A withfactor VIII inhibitor and its clinical characteristics.Methods A cross-sectional descriptive study was performed onchildren with severe hemophilia-A at the National Hemophilia CareCentre, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia, in June-August 2004.Results Out of 45 children studied, 16 had factor VIII inhibitor withaverage inhibitor titre of 1.15 Bethesda units (BU) (range 0.15-15BU). Most of them (12 patients) had inhibitor titre <5 BU. Chronicarthropathy was found in 17 out of 45 (37%) children with severehemophilia-A, consisting of nine patients from positive inhibitorgroup and 8 patients from negative inhibitor group. Thirty-ninepatients (86%) used an on-demand treatment pattern, among whom15 had positive inhibitor. Among patients receiving prophylactictreatment pattern, only one had positive inhibitor. There were 39patients (86%) treated using cryoprecipitate, among whom factorVIII inhibitor was found in 12, while among those treated with fac-tor VIII concentrate, the inhibitor was positive in 4/6. The averageamount of factor VIII transfused in positive and negative factor VIIIinhibitor groups was similar.Conclusion The prevalence of factor VIII inhibitor in severe he-mophilia-A patients was 35%. Chronic arthropathy occurred moreoften in patients with positive factor VIII inhibitor. Factor VIII inhibi-tor was found more frequently in patients with an on-demand treat-ment pattern and in those using factor VIII concentrate

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