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Paediatrica Indonesiana
ISSN : 00309311     EISSN : 2338476X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
Paediatrica Indonesiana is a medical journal devoted to the health, in a broad sense, affecting fetuses, infants, children, and adolescents, belonged to the Indonesian Pediatric Society. Its publications are directed to pediatricians and other medical practitioners or researchers at all levels of health practice throughout the world.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 9 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 45 No 6 (2005): November 2005" : 9 Documents clear
The profile of acute glomerulonephritis among Indonesian children Albar, Husein; Rauf, Syarifuddin
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 45 No 6 (2005): November 2005
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi45.6.2005.264-9

Abstract

Background Acute glomerulonephritis (AGN) is a form of glom-erulonephritis characterized by sudden and explosive onset of glom-erular injury symptom. It usually occurs after recent infection bygroup A beta-hemolytic streptococcus. AGN among Indonesianchildren seems to be less frequently reported than that among othercountries.Objective To determine the current profile of AGN among Indo-nesian children hospitalized in eleven teaching centers.Methods This was a descriptive, cross-sectional study, based ona review of the standard medical records of 509 children with AGNhospitalized in 11 teaching centers in Indonesia over a five-yearperiod (1997-2002). Data extracted from the medical records con-sisted of history of illness, clinical and laboratory findings, and chestX-rays.Results Age of the patients at the onset of AGN ranged from 2.5 to15 years, with peak age of 8.5 years. The majority (76.4%) wasabove 6 years old with male predominance (58.3%). About 68.9%and 82% of the patients came from low socioeconomic and low edu-cational status families. Antecedent upper respiratory infections wereobserved in 45.8% cases and pyoderma in 31.6%. The diseaseseemed to be more commonly elicited by streptococcal infectionthan by other infections, as proved by an elevated anti-streptolisinO (ASO) titer (66.6%) and decreased C 3 concentrations (60.4%).The frequent clinical features included periorbital edema (76.3%),hypertension (61.8%), and gross hematuria (53.6%). The most preva-lent laboratory findings were microhematuria (99.3%), proteinuria(98.5%), raised erythrocyte sedimentation rate (85.3%). The initialchest X-rays showed pleural effusion (81.6%) and cardiomegaly(80.2%), whereas echocardiogram documented pericardial effusion(81.6%). Acute pulmonary edema (11.5%), hypertensive encepha-lopathy (9.2%), and acute renal failure (10.5%) were frequent com-plications noted in our study.Conclusion Despite no adequate data on throat or skin cul-tures, AGN among Indonesian children seems mostly to bepoststreptococcal AGN as proved by the elevated ASO titerand decrease in serum C 3 concentration
The use of score for neonatal acute physiology perinatal extention II (SNAPPE II) in predicting neonatal outcome in neonatal intensive care unit A, Mia R; Etika, Risa; Harianto, Agus; Indarso, Fatimah; Damanik, Sylviati M
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 45 No 6 (2005): November 2005
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi45.6.2005.241-5

Abstract

Background Scoring systems which quantify initial risks have animportant role in aiding execution of optimum health services by pre-dicting morbidity and mortality. One of these is the score for neonatalacute physiology perinatal extention (SNAPPE), developed byRichardson in 1993 and simplified in 2001. It is derived of 6 variablesfrom the physical and laboratory observation within the first 12 hoursof admission, and 3 variables of perinatal risks of mortality.Objectives To assess the validity of SNAPPE II in predicting mor-tality at neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), Soetomo Hospital,Surabaya. The study was also undertaken to evolve the best cut-offscore for predicting mortality.Methods Eighty newborns were admitted during a four-month periodand were evaluated with the investigations as required for the specifi-cations of SNAPPE II. Neonates admitted >48 hours of age or afterhaving been discharged, who were moved to lower newborn care <24hours and those who were discharged on request were excluded. Re-ceiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) were constructed to derivethe best cut-off score with Kappa and McNemar Test.Results Twenty eight (35%) neonates died during the study, 22(82%) of them died within the first six days. The mean SNAPPE IIscore was 26.3+19.84 (range 0-81). SNAPPE II score of thenonsurvivors was significantly higher than the survivors(42.75+18.59 vs 17.4+14.05; P=0.0001). SNAPPE II had a goodperformance in predicting overall mortality and the first-6-daysmortality, with area under the ROC 0.863 and 0.889. The best cut-off score for predicting mortality was 30 with sensitivity 81.8%,specificity 76.9%, positive predictive value 60.0% and negativepredictive value 90.0%.Conclusions SNAPPE II is a measurement of illness severity whichcorrelates well with neonatal mortality at NICU, Soetomo Hospital.The score of more than 30 is associated with higher mortality
Retinopathy of prematurity: Prevalence and risk factors Rohsiswatmo, Rinawati
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 45 No 6 (2005): November 2005
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi45.6.2005.270-4

Abstract

Background Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is one of the ma-jor causes of infant blindness. There are several factors known asrisk factors for ROP. Recent studies show ROP as a disease ofmultifactorial origin.Objective To report the prevalence of ROP in Cipto MangunkusumoHospital, Jakarta and its relation to several risk factors.Methods A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted fromDecember 2003-May 2005. All infants with birth weight 2500 gramsor less, or gestational age 37 weeks or less, were enrolled con-secutively and underwent the screening of ROP at 4 to 6 weeks ofchronological age or 31 to 33 weeks of postconceptional age.Result Of 73 infant who met the inclusion criteria, 26% (19 out of73 infant) had ROP in various degrees. About 36.8% (7 out of 19infants) were in stage III or more/threshold ROP. No ROP wasnoted in infants born >35 weeks of gestational age, and birth weight>2100 grams. No severe ROP was found in gestational age >34weeks and birth weight >1600 grams. None of full-term, small forgestational age infants experienced ROP. Birth weight, sepsis,apneu, asphyxia, multiple blood transfusions, and oxygen therapyfor more than 7 days were statistically significant with the develop-ment of ROP. However, using multivariate analysis, only asphyxia,multiple blood transfusions, and oxygen therapy for more than 7days were statistically significant with the development of ROP.Conclusion Screening of ROP should be performed in infantsborn 34 weeks of gestational age and/or birth weight <1600 grams.Infants with birth weight from 1600-<2100 grams need to bescreened only if supplemental oxygen is necessary or with clini-cally severe illness
Adolescent rape: Characteristics and short-term impact Prawitasari, Titis; Gunardi, Hartono; Madiyono, Bambang; Tarigan, Rosdiana S
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 45 No 6 (2005): November 2005
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi45.6.2005.246-50

Abstract

Background Data in Indonesia show that adolescents still havethe highest rate for rape and other sexual assaults among agegroup. There are gender differences in adolescent rape and sexualassault, with female victims exceeding males with a ratio of 3:1.Sexual assault and rape can affect numerous children and oftenlead to short-term and long-term consequences.Objectives To determine the characteristics and short-term im-pacts of adolescent rape.Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted on 31 adoles-cents who had been raped 1-9 months previously. Subjects andparents were assessed using Child Behavior Checklist, Draw aPerson, House Tree Person, and Raven’s Progressive Matrices todetermine psychological problems. History and physical examina-tion findings at the time of rape were reviewed.Results Thirty out of 31 female adolescents were 13-18 years old.Almost half of them came from low income families and large fam-ilies, two-thirds of all subjects were living with their parents. Nine-teen of 31 perpetrators were friends or acquaintances, only 4 wererelatives. Tears of hymen were found in 21 subjects and only 8 ofthem had non-genital injuries. Nine of 31 subjects had a high aver-age range in non-verbal processing. Most subjects had a greattendency to feel insecure, anxiety, depression, and had interper-sonal relationship problems. Regression and aggressiveness werefound in almost half of the subjects. All subjects felt that theirmothers were protective and half of them had dominant fathers.Conclusion Almost half of the adolescent victims come from low-economic status and large families, most of the assailants werefriends or acquaintances. Adolescent rape victims have ongoingbehaviour problems. The most common problems are anxiety,depression, and relationship problems
Use of surfactant in neonatal intensive care units Kosim, M Sholeh
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 45 No 6 (2005): November 2005
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi45.6.2005.233-40

Abstract

Surfactant is currently an important therapyfor newborns in neonatal intensive care units(NICUs) with respiratory problems,specifically respiratory distress syndrome(RDS). Surfactant was initially used in 1959, after itwas recognized for maintaining lung inflation at lowtranspulmonary pressures. Avery and Mead in Jobereported that saline extracts from the lungs ofpreterm infants with RDS lacked the low surfacetension characteristics of pulmonary surfactant.Subsequently, in 1980, clinical potential of surfactanttherapy for RDS was demonstrated by Fujiwara et al,reported in Jobe, in the use of surfactant preparedfrom an organic solvent extracted from bovine lung(Surfactant TA). Small randomized controlled trials(RCTs) in 1985, which tested surfactants preparedfrom bovine alveolar-lavage or human amniotic fluid,demonstrated significant decrease in pneumothoraxand death rates. Subsequent multi-center trialsdemonstrated decreased death rates andcomplications of RDS; although still investigational,its use begun in 1989. A synthetic surfactant wasapproved for the treatment of the syndrome in theUnited States in 1990, and an animal surfactant wasapproved in 1991. These surfactants represent a newclass of drug developed specifically for preterminfants.
Birth weight and blood pressure in first-grade elementary school students: A preliminary study Umboh, Adrian; Gunawan, Stefanus
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 45 No 6 (2005): November 2005
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi45.6.2005.251-5

Abstract

Background Fetal programming theory reveals that low birthweight is associated with higher risks of hypertension and cardio-vascular diseases in the adulthood.Objective To study the difference in blood pressure among first-grade students of different birth weight groups.Methods A cross-sectional study was performed. Blood pressureof 214 healthy first-grade elementary school students (102 malesand 112 females) in Bunaken Subdistrict, Manado, Indonesia, wasmeasured using a standard sphygmomanometer with appropriatecuff for arm size. Two readings were taken. Parents were asked tocomplete a questionnaire concerning the information on birth weightand length and confirmed by retrieving the record on a growthchart and/or a maternal-child health book. The subjects were di-vided into 6 groups according to their birth weight. The differencesin blood pressure values between birth weight groups were exam-ined by ANOVA.Results Systolic blood pressures were significantly higher in the<2500 g birth weight group (100.73+9.99 mmHg vs. 93.70+8.29mmHg) and in the 2500-<3000 g birth weight group compared tothose of the 3500-<4000 g one (99.56+9.14 mmHg vs. 93.70+8.29mmHg) with a P of 0.048 and 0.014, respectively. There was nodifference between diastolic blood pressure and birth weight.Conclusion Our study showed that the lower birth weight grouptends to have a higher systolic blood pressure than that of childrenwith normal birth weight
The effect of soybean formula and formula 100 supplementation on the growth of preschool children Mexitalia, M; Nugroho, Yohanes Tri; Susanto, J C
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 45 No 6 (2005): November 2005
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi45.6.2005.256-63

Abstract

Background Preschool children are vulnerable in growth. Soy-bean formula (SF) and formula-100 (F100) are supplementary foodswhich contain of high energy and are available at low price; how-ever, they are not widely used for preschool children.Objectives To investigate the effect of SF compared to F100 onthe growth of preschool children.Methods A cross-over trial was conducted on 96 preschool chil-dren aged 4-7 years. Subjects were randomly divided into 2 groupswhich received 200 ml soybean formula (n=49) or F100 (n=47) for1 month and crossed-over after a six-week wash-out period. Bodyweight was measured weekly. Body height and food analysis by 3-day food recall were measured at the beginning and the end of thestudy. The criteria of the acceptability of the formula was eithergood or poor.Results Supplementation with SF as well as F100 induced catchup growth as shown by the increase of Δz-score. There were nosignificant difference of Δ weight for age z-score, Δ height for agez-score, and Δ weight for height z score between groups duringthe first and second phases of the trial. The acceptability of F100was significantly better than that of SF at the beginning; neverthe-less, the difference was not significant at the second phase trial.Conclusions Soybean formula and F100 given for a one monthperiod can induce catch-up growth in preschool children. Soybeanformula as an alternative health food can be accepted by preschoolchildren
Growth and development profile of children at two day care centers in Jakarta Widyastuti, Siti Budiati; Soedjatmiko, Soedjatmiko; Firmansyah, Agus
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 45 No 6 (2005): November 2005
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi45.6.2005.275-9

Abstract

Background Working mothers with toddlers are often confusedwith the difficulties of caregiver substitutes. This leads to the con-cern about neglecting their toddlers. Day care centers are expectedto respond by substituting the absent mothers, in order for thechildren’s needs of growth and development to become optimal.Objective To examine the profile of day care centers in correla-tion with growth and development of toddlers, and to understandthe characteristics of facilities for growth and development in tod-dlers at day care centers.Method This cross-sectional study was conducted at the day carecenters (DCC) of the Department of Social Affairs of the Republicof Indonesia Harapan Ibu (HI) in Salemba, Central Jakarta andTeratai in Bekasi from February 1-August 1, 2004.Results There were 106 children enrolled in this study; 47 chil-dren in DCC HI and 59 in DCC Teratai, male:female ratio was 1:1,mostly at age 3.1-5 years. Growth status was measured accord-ing to body weight/age, body height/age, height circumference/age and found good, normal, and proper growth status in 85 chil-dren (80.2%), 48 children (45.3%), 102 children (96.2%), respec-tively. We found good nutritional status in 44 children (41.5%) andnormal developmental status (Denver II) in 81 children (76.4%).Ratio of caregivers to child was 1:10. All children had completeimmunization. No trauma or upper respiratory tract infection wasrecorded as frequent morbidity. Parents’ reasons for relying theirchildren in DCCs were to enable their children to socialize (50children/47.2%), and to allow them to become independent (49children/46.2%).Conclusion DCCs can serve as a safe alternative caregiving sub-stitute based on good growth and development, good nutritionalstatus, also good characteristics facilities
Nasopharyngeal carcinoma in childhood Lubis, Bidasari; Rosdiana, Nelly; Margaretha, Saur L
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 45 No 6 (2005): November 2005
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi45.6.2005.280-4

Abstract

Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a raretumor which originates from thenasopharyngeal epithelium. It accountsfor <1% of childhood malignancy cases,whereas almost all adult nasopharyngeal cancers arecarcinomas. In children, nasopharyngealmalignancies are mostly rhabdomyosarcomas andonly 20-30% are carcinomas or lymphomas.Approximately one third of the undifferentiated typeNPC is diagnosed in adolescents or young adults.

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