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Paediatrica Indonesiana
ISSN : 00309311     EISSN : 2338476X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
Paediatrica Indonesiana is a medical journal devoted to the health, in a broad sense, affecting fetuses, infants, children, and adolescents, belonged to the Indonesian Pediatric Society. Its publications are directed to pediatricians and other medical practitioners or researchers at all levels of health practice throughout the world.
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Articles 8 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 46 No 2 (2006): March 2006" : 8 Documents clear
Randomized controlled trial of Phyllanthus niruri Linn extract Sarisetyaningtyas, Patria Vittarina; Hadinegoro, Sri Rezeki; Munasir, Zakiudin
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 46 No 2 (2006): March 2006
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi46.2.2006.77-81

Abstract

Background Clinical benefits of antiviral treatment in childrenexperience varicella without complications, remains controversial.Phyllanthus niruri Linn extract as a natural medicine is used toincrease cellular and humoral immunity.Objective To determine the efficacy and safety of Phyllanthusniruri Linn extract in the treatment of varicella in children comparedto placebo.Methods This was a double-blind randomized controlled trial onchildren ages 2-14 years who experienced varicella without com-plications. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive eitherPhyllanthus niruri Linn extract syrup (5 mg/5ml, 3 times daily) orplacebo. Efficacy was measured by calculating the number of pap-ules and crusts after taking the extract for 4 days of administration.A five-day monitoring sheet to record daily follow up and adverseeffects of the subjects were given to their parents.Results Efficacy of Phyllanthus niruri Linn measurement basedon no more new papules occurred at the five-day monitor was de-tected in 46 subject (51.1%) of the Phyllantus niruri Linn groupcompared to the placebo group (P=0.723). Meanwhile, the differ-ence of efficacy based on time of crusts disappear in Phyllanthusniruri Linn and placebo group were 22 subjects (43.1%) and 15subject (30.0%), respectively (P=0.053). This finding proved haveclinical benefit (NNT=7.6).Conclusion There was no significant difference between the ef-ficacy of Phyllanthus niruri Linn and placebo in terms of the pre-vention appearing new papules and crusts. However, clinicallyPhyllanthus niruri Linn accelerates appearing and aborting crustcompared to placebo
Adverse effects of hyperbilirubinemia on the development of healthy term infants Arimbawa, I Made; Soetjiningsih, Soetjiningsih; Kari, I K
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 46 No 2 (2006): March 2006
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi46.2.2006.51-6

Abstract

Background Indirect hyperbilirubinemia is a common problem dur-ing the neonatal period and may cause long-term abnormality ordevelopmental delay.Objective To evaluate the adverse effects of hyperbilirubinemiaon the development of healthy term infants.Methods This was a prospective cohort study on healthy terminfants born in Sanglah Hospital, Denpasar. Mullen Scale Testswere performed at the ages of 3 and 6 months to assess subjects’development. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were conductedto examine the relationship between several dependent variablesand developmental outcomes.Results One hundred and twelve infants were enrolled in this study[56 with hyperbilirubinemia, 56 without hyperbilirubinemia; 58 (52%)male, 54 (48%) female]. Mean birth weight was 318.3 grams (SD342.26) vs 3162.5 grams (SD 338.61). At the age of 3 months,below average category according to Mullen Scale Test was higherin infants with history of hyperbilirubinemia compared to those with-out hyperbilirubinemia, which was statistically significant for finemotor scale (17.9% vs 5.4%; respectively; P=0.039; RR 1.66; 95%CI 1.15;2.39). At 6 months of age, it was higher in infants withhistory of hyperbilirubinemia compared to those without hyperbi-lirubinemia and this was statistically significant for gross motor scale(19.6% vs 3.6%, respectively; RR 1.86; 95%CI 1.36; 2.56; P=0.008)and fine motor scale (17.9% vs 5.4%, respectively; RR 1.66; 95%CI1.15; 2.39; P=0.039). Multivariate logistic regression test showedthat only hyperbilirubinemia was correlated with gross motor scaledelay at the age of 6 months (P=0.027; OR 5.97; 95%CI 1.22;29.12).Conclusion Healthy term infants with history of hiperbilirubinemiawere associated with increased gross motor scale delay at theage of 6 months
Phenotypic diversity in beta-HbE thalassemia patients Wahidiyat, Pustika Amalia; Gatot, Djajadiman; Tjitrasari, Tenny; Ringoringo, Harapan Parlindungan; Marzuki, N S; Taufani, R A; Setianingsih, I; Harahap, A
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 46 No 2 (2006): March 2006
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi46.2.2006.82-6

Abstract

Background Thalassemia is a monogenic disease, yet the clini-cal manifestations (phenotype) are variable although they havethe same genotype. The clear-cut correlation between genotypeand phenotype in β-thalassaemia/HbE patients remains unex-plained. There are several factors that play a role in the severity ofthe clinical manifestations, i.e. two alpha-gene deletion, homozy-gote Xmn1 polymorphism +/+, -+-++, ++-++ haplotype, and hemo-globin Constant Spring.Objective To understand the clinical diversity of patients with HbE/α thalassemia and to determine whether it is possible to predictphenotypic severity from genetic factors.Methods A descriptive study on clinical presentations and hema-tological data of beta-HbE thalassemia patients. DNA analysis wasperformed to detect β-thalassemia mutations and the amelioratingfactors (alpha-globin genes deletions and Xmn1 restriction site poly-morphism at position –158 upstream of the G γ-globin gene) whichwere already known.Results Thirty patients with HbE/β thalassemia (4 to 29 years old)were recruited. IVS1-nt5 (G>C) severe β + mutation was detectedin 20 patients. Eighteen of 20 patients with positive IVS1-nt5 mu-tation group were heterozygous for Xmn1 restriction site polymor-phism and none of the patients was co-inherited with two á-globingene deletion. Almost all patients (19/20) with positive IVS1-nt5mutation group required regular transfusions, yet the mean age atfirst blood transfusion was older in negative IVS1-nt5 mutation groupthan that of positive IVS1-nt5 mutation group (5.7 vs 4 years). Meanhemoglobin before initial transfusion was higher in negative IVS1-nt5 mutation group than that of positive IVS1-nt5 mutation group(5.88 vs 5.39 g/dl). The mean total transfusion per year was lowerin the negative IVS1-nt5 mutation group than that of positive IVS1-nt5 mutation group (190.6 vs 215.1 ml/year).Conclusions Beta-HbE thalassemia patients with identical betathalassemia mutation (IVS1-nt5) show remarkable clinical diver-sity. Neither two alpha-gene deletion, nor the Xmn1- G γ polymor-phism can explain the phenotypic variation. Other amelioratingdeterminants or genetic modifications responsible for the variableclinical severity remain to be explored.
The influence of intensive nutritional counseling in Posyandu towards the growth 4-18 month old children Noviati, Noviati; Susanto, J C; Selina, H; Mexitalia, M
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 46 No 2 (2006): March 2006
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi46.2.2006.57-63

Abstract

Introduction Under 5 years is a critical period for child growth,when growth faltering often occurs. Periodical growth monitoringand nutritional counseling can detect growth faltering earlier, de-termine the cause, and find alternatives to solve such problems.Objective To determine the benefit of nutritional counseling onknowledge, attitude, practice of mothers, and child growth.Methods A randomized controlled trial was conducted inSendangguwo, Semarang on 143 children of the treatment groupand 135 children of the control group. Nutritional counseling wasgiven to mothers in the treatment group by trained health volun-teers. Changes of weight for age Z-score (WAZ), height for age Z-score (HAZ), and weight for height Z-score (WHZ) were analyzedrepeatedly by using ANOVA. The differences of ΔWAZ, ΔHAZ, andΔWHZ between groups were compared by student t-test. GEE (gen-eralized estimating equation) analysis was used to analyze theeffect of confounding variables on the changes of WAZ.Results After 6 months of counseling, knowledge, attitude, andpractice of nutrition in the treatment group significantly increasedcompared to that of the control group (P<0.001). The WAZ, HAZ,and WHZ curves in the control group decreased. However, in thetreatment group, WHZ increased and there was stabilization ofWAZ. At the end of the study, treatment group had significantlyimproved their WAZ (P<0.001), HAZ (P=0.004), and WHZ(P<0.001) compared to that of the control group.Conclusion Nutritional counseling can improve knowledge, atti-tude, and practice of mothers, and has beneficial effects on childgrowth by WAZ, HAZ, and WHZ
Effects of zinc supplementation on nutritional status and cognition in children S, Retno Asih; Warsiki, Endang; Hidajat, Boerhan
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 46 No 2 (2006): March 2006
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi46.2.2006.64-70

Abstract

Background Zinc deficiency is common in children in develop-ing countries and data suggests the effects are detrimental towardschildren’s growth and neuropsychologic performance. Results ofmultiple studies which assess these effects have been inconsis-tent.Objective To evaluate the effects of zinc supplementation onnutritional status and cognition in children with zinc deficiency.Methods Forty-six stunted children aged 50-80 months with lowhair zinc levels were randomly assigned to receive either 7.5 mgelemental Zn or placebo twice a week for 3 months. Anthropom-etry and cognition were assessed at the beginning and the end ofthe supplementation period. Differences among both groups foranthropometry and cognition before and after supplementation wereanalyzed with paired t-test. A comparison of different anthropom-etry and cognition among the two groups were analyzed using theindependent t-test.Results There were no significant differences among baselinecharacteristics except on sex distribution.There was a significantdifference in weight for age between the zinc group and placebo[0.28 (SB 0.18) vs 0.09 (SB 0.14); P=0.0001]. Height incrementswere also greater in the zinc group [0.34 (SB 0.15) vs 0.02 (SB0.12); P=0.0001). There was no significant difference betweenweight for height. Intelligence quotient (IQ) measured by theStanford-Binnet test was slightly higher in the zinc group [2.26 (SB3.11) vs 2.00 (SB 2.81], but the difference was not significant ac-cording to sex.Conclusion Zinc supplementation produced highly positive re-sponses in weight for age and height for age increments in chil-dren with zinc deficiency compared with placebo. There was noeffect of zinc supplementation on weight for height index and noneon cognition measured by intelligence quotient (IQ)
Erythrocyturia and proteinuria conversion in post-streptococcal acute glomerulonephritis Suarta, I Ketut
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 46 No 2 (2006): March 2006
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi46.2.2006.71-6

Abstract

Background Acute glomerulonephritis (AGN) is a sudden onsetof macroscopic hematuria and edema. The chronic post-strepto-coccal acute glomerulonephritis (PSAGN) can be predicted if mi-croscopic hematuria, proteinuria, and low serum complement C3level are present for a period exceeding six months after initial onsetof illness. It is prudent to follow the course of PSAGN until proteinurianormalizes and microhematuria disappears in urinalysis.Objective To acquire the time of erythrocyturia and proteinuriaconversion in post-streptococcal acute glomerulonephritis (PSAGN)among children.Methods A retrospective cohort study on children with PSAGNwas conducted in the Pediatric Outpatient Clinic and Ward atSanglah Hospital, Denpasar, Bali from January 2001-December2003. All subjects were recorded for clinical and laboratory signs,including initial symptoms, history of previous streptococcal infec-tions, blood pressure, complete blood count, serum albumin, ASTOtiter, complement C3 level, BUN, and serum creatinin. Erythrocyt-uria and proteinuria follow-ups were done by recording urinalysisfindings for a six-month period after initial onset.Results Thirty subjects 21 boys and 9 girls, mean age 8.7 (SD 2.5)years] with PSAGN were enrolled in the study, 16 had hematuria withedema. Twenty-one subjects had the history of upper respiratory tractinfections and 9 with skin infections. Mean systolic blood pressure was141.3 (SD 21.8) mmHg, mean diastolic blood pressure was 90.8 (SD16.3) mmHg, mean ASTO titer was 1103.3 (SD 686.1) IU/ml, and meancomplement C3 level was 42.2 (SD 15.5) mg/dl. Urinalysis monitoringshowed 2/30, 9/30, 12/30, 22/30, 27/30 subjects had conversion he-maturia at the first, second, third, fourth, and fifth month, respectively.Median duration of erythrocyturia conversion was 4.0 months (95% CI:3.53-4.47). There were 11/30, 18/30, 21/30, 23/30, 25/30, 26/30 sub-jects with proteinuria conversion at the first, second, third, fourth, fifth,and sixth month, respectively. Median duration of proteinuria conver-sion was 2.0 months (95% CI: 1.25-2.75).Conclusion Three out of 30 children remained with persistenthematuria and 4 of 30 remained with persistent proteinuria
Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis associated with uveitis in a 4-year-old girl Sukmawati, Made; Santoso, Hendra; Susila, Niti
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 46 No 2 (2006): March 2006
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi46.2.2006.87-92

Abstract

The variability of the disease may explain mis-conceptions that JRA is usually a benign disease. Acohort study in which 506 subjects during the periodof 1970-1999 found that approximately one-third ofJRA patients achieve disease remission. The visualcomplications are also important in determining theoutcome. Functional disability is common and can belong-lasting. Recognizing JRA symptoms earlier areimportant to prevent mortality, disability, and long-term complications. Although JRA is the most com-mon rheumatic disease in children, many doctors arenot familiar with this disease. The purpose of thispaper is to report a case of juvenile rheumatoid ar-thritis associated with uveitis in a 4-year, 8-month-old girl.
Childhood renal cell carcinoma Shahab, Nouval; Rodjani, Arry; Umbas, Rainy
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 46 No 2 (2006): March 2006
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi46.2.2006.93-6

Abstract

Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in children isseldom found. The incidence of thistumor in childhood is estimated to be 0.1-0.3% out of all neoplasms and 2-7% out ofall malignant renal tumors. The Third NationalCancer Survey reported an incidence of only four casesof RCC per year compared to 117 per year of Wilms’tumor.The incidence of RCC has not been reported inIndonesia. This is the first case of childhood RCCfound in our institution. To the best of our knowl-edge, this is the first report of childhood RCC in In-donesia.

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