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Paediatrica Indonesiana
ISSN : 00309311     EISSN : 2338476X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
Paediatrica Indonesiana is a medical journal devoted to the health, in a broad sense, affecting fetuses, infants, children, and adolescents, belonged to the Indonesian Pediatric Society. Its publications are directed to pediatricians and other medical practitioners or researchers at all levels of health practice throughout the world.
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Articles 8 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 46 No 3 (2006): May 2006" : 8 Documents clear
Clinical gestational age assessment in newborns using the new Ballard score Erman, Erman; Retayasa, Wayan; Soetjiningsih, Soetjiningsih
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 46 No 3 (2006): May 2006
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi46.3.2006.97-101

Abstract

Background The new Ballard score (NBS) is presently consid-ered to be the most reliable method for estimating clinical gesta-tional age (GA) in newborn infants.Objective The aim of this study was to compare the NBS andDubowitz/Finnstrom score against ultrasonography assessment ofgestational age.Methods A cross sectional randomized study involving neonatesborn in Sanglah Hospital, Bali, June to August 2004 was carriedout. Gestational age was estimated within the first 24 hour by ei-ther Dubowitz/Finnstrom score or NBS confirmed by USG (C-GLMP) as the gold standard.Results One hundred and fifty-five newborns were enrolled in thisstudy. Subjects were randomly divided into two groups, theDubowitz/Finnstrom score group (76 newborns) and NBS group(79 newborns). The mean age of mothers was 28.4 years old; meanbirth weight was 3151.3 g (SD 596.3 g). The proportion of small forGA, appropriate for GA, and large for GA were 6%, 77% and 17%,respectively. Pearson correlation ( r ) between C-GLMP andDubowitz/Finnstrom score was 0.71 (P<0.005); and with NBS was0.79 (P<0.005) .Conclusion The strength of correlation between either NBS orDubowitz/Finnstrom score and USG assessment of gestational ageare similar
Splenectomy and its relation to non-transfusion-transmitted infection in thalassemic patients Aisyi, Mururul; Tumbelaka, Alan Roland; Munthe, Bulan Ginting; Madiyono, Bambang
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 46 No 3 (2006): May 2006
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi46.3.2006.134-8

Abstract

Background Splenectomy has been associated with an increasedsusceptibility to infection. Overwhelming postspelenectomy infec-tion (OPSI) can lead to high mortality. Decreased IgM and tuftsinconcentration on splenectomized patients seems to play a role ininfection’s susceptibility. Many studies have been performed todetermine the risk factors of infection in thalassemic patients.Objective To find out morbidity patterns and risk factors for pre-dicting the likelihood of infection in splenectomized thalassemicpatients.Methods A retrospective cross sectional study was conducted onconfirmed thalassemic children who came to Department of ChildHealth, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital within the period of 1973-2003. Splenectomized patients were categorized as cases groupand non-splenectomized patients as control group. Risk factors fordevelopment of common cold and diarrhea were analyzed usingchi-square test with level of significance <0.05.Results A total of 300 thalassemic patients, 100 of them were sple-nectomized, were enrolled in this study. The 15-year-age group orabove is the most common group underwent splenectomy (35%).Common cold is the most common mild infection in both splenec-tomized group (75%) and non-splenectomized (71%). A significantassociation was found between the risk of infection and splenec-tomy in thalassemic patients (OR=3.8;CI=2.2;6.62; P=0.000). As-sociation between time after splenectomy and frequency of com-mon cold in thalassemia was significant (OR=2.85;CI=1.16;7.14;P=0.011). Severe infection and acute diarrhea were considerednot significantly different between the two groups.Conclusion Splenectomy in thalassemia can increase the sus-ceptibility of non-transfusion-transmitted mild infection. Furtherstudy is needed to elaborate this finding
High frequency of the 3R/3R polymorphism in the thymidylate synthase enhancer region in Indonesian childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia Ugrasena, IDG; Sutaryo, Sutaryo; Supriadi, Edy; Vroling, Laura; Cloos, Jacqueline; Hooijberg, Jan Hendrik; Veerman, AJP
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 46 No 3 (2006): May 2006
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi46.3.2006.103-12

Abstract

Background Deoxyuridylate monophosphate (dTMP) is neces-sary for DNA synthesis and thymidylate synthase (TS) is an im-portant target of cancer chemotherapy. Ethnic variations of thepolymorphic tandem repeat sequence in the enhancer region ofthe TS promoter has previously been described to influence theoutcome of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). A triple repeat isassociated with a higher TS gene expression than a double re-peat, resulting in poorer outcome of ALL patients treated with anti-folate methotrexate (MTX).Objective In this study, we determined the incidences of TS andmethylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) polymorphism andethnic variations between Indonesian and Caucasian ALL cellsamples obtained at diagnosis. Furthermore, we determined theinvolvement of TS polymorphisms in MTX sensitivity using athymidilate synthase inhibition assay (TSIA).Methods ALL cell samples were obtained at diagnosis from 101Indonesian and 157 Caucasian children treated with MTX prospec-tively. Genotyping for TS and MTHFR was analyzed by Genescanand Lightcycler. TS polymorphism was determined by PCR assayand MTHFR polymorphism and was analyzed by melting curveanalyses on lightcycler.Results Homozygous TS triple repeats were more than twice ascommon in Indonesian samples (76.3%) than in Caucasian samples(33.1%). Heterozygotes of the MTHFR mutations were seen in 15%of the screened Indonesian samples.Conclusion There are significant ethnic variations in TS generegulatory elements of leukemic cells. A difference was found be-tween the MTX sensitivity and a double or triple repeat in the Cau-casian ALL group. The samples with a triple repeat show a shift intheir distribution towards hypersensitivity to MTX. Further investi-gation on Indonesian samples may give insight in the role of poly-morphisms in MTX sensitivity
Probiotic treatment in children with lactose intolerance – An open labeled the one group pre-test post-test experimental study Arifin, Zainul; Boediarso, Aswitha D.; Tambunan, Taralan
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 46 No 3 (2006): May 2006
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi46.3.2006.139-43

Abstract

Background Lactose intolerance is the most common disorder ofintestinal carbohydrate digestion. Probiotic that contains the cor-rect strain in appropriate amount can be used as an alternativedietary for lactose intolerance patients.Objective This study was designed to describe the role of probioticin relieving lactose intolerance symptoms in children consumedfull-cream milk.Methods This study was a clinical trial. Inclusion criteria was chil-dren aged 12-14 years old, had a good nutrition and health status,with positive breath hydrogen test (BHT) result and lactose intoler-ance symptom(s), and their parents gave consent. Forty-two chil-dren were included. All subjects consumed one glass (200 ml) offull-cream milk twice a day for 21 days and recorded intolerancesymptoms. Probiotic was added from 8 th to 21 st day in their milk,and responses of treatment were evaluated by scoring system(based on borborigmic, flatulence, abdominal bloating, nausea andvomiting, abdominal pain, and diarrhea symptoms). At the end ofstudy they were undergone second BHT examination.Results There were decreasing mean score rates at 7 th day (pre)13.8 (SD 5.5) compared with 7.5 (SD 3.5) at 14 th day (after) andwas statistically significant (P<0.001). Mean score rate at 7 th day(pre) 13.8 (SD 5.5) compared with 21 st day (after) was 0.119 (SD0.55) and was statistically significant (P<0.001). At the end of study,only 2 subjects showed clinical signs of lactose intolerance. Thirty-six subjects had normal BHT result at 21 st day and was statisti-cally significant (P<0.001).Conclusion Two weeks administration of probiotic could relievelactose intolerance symptoms in children consumed full-cream milk
The value of IgG to IgM ratio in predicting secondary dengue infection Karyana, I Putu Gede; Santoso, Hendra; Arhana, Bagus Ngurah Putu
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 46 No 3 (2006): May 2006
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi46.3.2006.113-7

Abstract

Background The determination of primary or secondary dengueinfection using hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test is time-con-suming. The IgG to IgM ratio which can be obtained earlier wasused by several studies to differentiate secondary from primaryinfection, but they still reported various cut-off points.Objective To find the diagnostic value and best cut off point ofIgG to IgM ratio for predicting secondary dengue infection.Methods This was a prospective study carried out between July2003 and June 2004. Children with suspected dengue hemor-rhagic fever (DHF) were tested for HI during acute and convales-cent phase. The IgG and IgM titer were examined during the acutephase using ELISA method.Results Sixty-two children were recruited, 48 with secondary in-fection and 14 with primary infection. The prevalence of second-ary infection was 77%. The best cut off point of the IgG to IgM ratioto predict secondary infection was >1.1 with sensitivity of 87.5%,specificity 92.9%, likelihood ratio 12.3, and post test probability97.7%.Conclusion The IgG to IgM ratio of >1.1 is a good predictor forsecondary infection
Growth diagrams of Indonesian children The nationwide survey of 2005 Batubara, Jose; Alisjahbana, Anna; JGMGerver-Jansen, Angèle; Alisjahbana, Bachti; Sadjimin, Tony; Tasli, Yulniar; Juhariah, Juhariah; Tririni, Angky; Padmosiwi, Woro Indri; Listiaty, Tya; Delemarre–van de Waal, Henriette A; Gerver, Willem J
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 46 No 3 (2006): May 2006
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi46.3.2006.118-26

Abstract

Background Reference curves of growth have been developedin many countries based on cross-sectional data. The World HealthOrganization (WHO) has recommended an international referencewhich is based on the growth standards developed within the UnitedStates during the 1970s. In general these growth references areused in Indonesian pediatric clinics although it is known that thesereferences are not appropriate for this population with a differentethnic background. In order to evaluate reliably Indonesian chil-dren with growth disorders reference standards based on mea-surements in Indonesian children are necessary.Objective To make a standard growth chart for Indonesian chil-dren especially with regards to height, weight, and head circum-ference from a healthy Indonesian infants and children, age 0-18years. This standard charts were compared to CDC growth charts.Methods Weight and height and head circumference were takenfrom children with age ranging from birth up to 18 years. All sub-jects were recruited from 7 different parts of Indonesia. The agegrouping for children from 0-1 years old was based on 3-monthinterval, while for children older than 12 months was based on a 6-month interval. The study was cross sectional.Results There were 34 800 children (17 229 boys and 17 571girls) included in this study with age ranging from 0 up to 18 years.Graphs were presented for weight for age, supine length for age,head circumference for age in male and female infants, and weightfor height and height for age in boys and girls 1-18 years.Comparson of the results of this study with the CDC data werepresented as a graph.Conclusion The standard charts for Indonesian children basedon weight for height, supine length for height and head circumfer-ence for age were presented in graphs for children 0-1 year, weightfor height and height for age for boys and girls 1-18 years old. Allchildren were compared to CDC growth charts and there exists amean difference of -1.47 SDS for boys and -1.43 SDS forgirls.
The role of bovine colostrum on recovery time and length of hospital stay of acute diarrhea in infants and children: a double-blind randomized controlled trial Suwarba, IGN; S, Sudaryat; S, Hendra; Suandi, IKG; Widiana, Raka
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 46 No 3 (2006): May 2006
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi46.3.2006.127-33

Abstract

Background WHO standard treatment for acute diarrhea remainsunsatisfying to the parents of acute diarrhea patients, particularlythe need of medical treatment. Bovine colostrum contains immuneand growth factors that is thought able to neutralize some agentscausing acute diarrhea in infants and children.Objective To evaluate the efficacy of bovine colostrum as adju-vant therapy on recovery time and length of hospital stay for acutediarrhea in infants and children.Methods A double-blind randomized controlled trial was conductedon infants and children with acute diarrhea admitted to SanglahHospital. Treatment group received standard therapy with bovinecolostrums and control group received standard therapy plus pla-cebo. The primary outcomes were achievement of recovery timeand length of hospital stay. Recovery time was determined by thenumber of days needed to achieve defecation frequency <3 times/day and needed to achieve normal stool consistency.Results Seventy infants and children were enrolled. The treatmentgroup significantly achieved recovery time earlier than the control groupin regard to the time of achieving defecation frequency to <3 times/day [2.31 (0.76) vs 3.34 (1.45); mean difference of -1.03; P= 0.001; CI95% -1.58;-0.48] and normal stool consistency [2.40 (0.77) vs 3.43(1.48); mean difference of -1.03; P = 0.001; CI 95% -1.59;-0.46]. Lengthof hospital stay was shorter in the treatment group than the controlgroup [2.89 (0.78) vs 3.94 (1.53); mean difference of -1.05; P= 0.001;CI 95% (-1.3;-0.7)]. No significant difference was found in mean ofbody weight recovery in two groups [0.47 (0.16) vs 0.49 (0.20); meandifference of -0.03; P=0.556; CI 95%: -0.11;0.06]. Age, nutritionalstatus, breastfeeding, and diarrhea before admission did not influ-ence the study outcome.Conclusion Bovine colostrums as an adjuvant in standard therapyfor acute diarrhea in infants and children is effective in regard toachieve earlier recovery time and shorter length of hospital stay
Clinical features of dengue hemorrhagic fever and risk factors of shock event Dewi, Rismala; Tumbelaka, Alan Roland; Sjarif, Damayanti Rusli
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 46 No 3 (2006): May 2006
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi46.3.2006.144-8

Abstract

Background Dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) can lead to highmorbidity and mortality. Its clinical features vary from time to time.Many studies were performed to determine the risk factors of se-vere dengue infection.Objective To find out clinical features and risk factors for predict-ing the likelihood of shock in DHF.Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted in all con-firmed DHF children who were hospitalized at the Department ofChild Health, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital within the period ofJanuary 1, 2003 until June 30, 2004. Risk factors for developmentof shock were analyzed using chi-square test and multiple logisticregressions with a level of significance of <0.05.Results A total of 101 patients, consisted of 47 males and 54females were enrolled in this study. Mean age was 6.5 (SD 3.6)years, ranged from 5 months to 15 years. About 31.7% patientshad grade III DHF, 30.7% grade II, and 26.7% grade IV (including1 patient with encephalopathy). Shock was more frequent amongpatients aged between 6-10 years, female, under-nourished, bodytemperature <38°C, hematocrit level 46-50 vol%, and platelet count<20 000/ml. During year 2003-2004, there was increased numberof patients who developed shock. Based on univariate analysis,hepatomegaly, high hematocrit value, and thrombocytopenia wereconsidered significantly different. Among those variables analyzedwith multiple logistic regression method, only hepatomegaly andthrombocytopenia were identified as predictors of shock.Conclusion There was an alteration on clinical features of DHFin our hospital in 2003-2004 period compared to the previous years.Hepatomegaly and platelet count <50 000/ml are independent riskfactors of shock among DHF patients

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