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Paediatrica Indonesiana
ISSN : 00309311     EISSN : 2338476X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
Paediatrica Indonesiana is a medical journal devoted to the health, in a broad sense, affecting fetuses, infants, children, and adolescents, belonged to the Indonesian Pediatric Society. Its publications are directed to pediatricians and other medical practitioners or researchers at all levels of health practice throughout the world.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 12 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 47 No 6 (2007): November 2007" : 12 Documents clear
Effect of iron and zinc supplementation in the treatment of malaria in children Dasraf, Danny; Lubis, Bugis Mardina; Lubis, Bidasari; Rosdiana, Nelly; Lubis, Munar; Pasaribu, Syahril
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 47 No 6 (2007): November 2007
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (345.527 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi47.6.2007.256-60

Abstract

Background Iron and zinc administration for children withmalaria in endemic area were known to decrease parasitemia butdata on their effectiveness when given together to increasereticulocytes as erythropoiesis parameter and hemoglobin isinsufficient.Objective To determine the effect of zinc to increase ironabsorption in the treatment of Plasmodium falciparum malaria inchildren.Methods Children with positive Plasmodium falciparum on theirblood smear (n=86) examination were randomly assigned to dailysupplementation of iron 6 mg per kg body weight per day plusplacebo or iron plus zinc 10 mg per day for 30 days. Venous bloodspecimens were collected at the start and at the end of the study.Results Sixty-nine children completed the supplementations andhad both baseline and follow-up blood specimen study. After 30-day supplementation, the iron plus placebo and iron plus zincgroups showed significant difference on hemoglobin concentration(0.58 and 0.09 g/dl; P<0.05). There was no significant differencein reticulocyte production index and reticulocyte count beforeand after intervention in both groups. There was only significantdifference in red blood cells concentration after supplementationof iron plus placebo and iron plus zinc (4.7 in 4.5 million/μl;P<0.05).Conclusions Iron supplementation with or without zinc showssignificant increase of hemoglobin concentration. It is slightlyhigher in iron plus placebo group.
Feeding pattern and nutritional status of infants in Belu District, East Nusa Tenggara Setyowireni, Dwikisworo; Surjono, Achmad
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 47 No 6 (2007): November 2007
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (436.296 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi47.6.2007.283-9

Abstract

Background The reduction of high rates of malnutrition willrequire greater attention to specific aspects of child feeding.Although much attention has been devoted recently to promotingappropriate breastfeeding practices, little effort has been directedto enhance complementary feeding.Objectives To assess feeding pattern among infants in Belu DistrictNusa Tenggara Timur, related to nutritional status of children.Methods Cross-sectional study was conducted in Belu District,East Nusa Tenggara using a two stage cluster sampling method toselect a sample of representative households. All infants wereassessed for current feeding practices and anthropometric.Results Among 87.8% infants are still breastfed, and 80.2% weregiven colostrum. The mother gave the baby plain water (27.4%),or sugar water (15.6%), or other liquid (31.7%) before giving thefirst breast milk. Timely first suckling was practiced 10.1% infants,timely first complementary feeding was achieved 90.3%, as wellas high rate of early introduction of semi-solid food in infants lessthan 4 months. Introduction of solid food was progressivelyincreased (3% in the newborn period to 72% in 3 months infant).Exclusive breastfeeding among infants < 4 months was decreasing(90% in newborn period to 28% in 3 months infants). Theproportion of infants fed solid foods was progressively increased(4% in infants <1 month to 72% in 3 months infant). The highprevalence of wasting reached 27.8% (CI 95%: 24,6-31,3). Theprevalence of children below -2 SD Z-scores was 10% (CI 95%:8-12.5), was classified as serious condition.Conclusions This study showed that high percentage of exclusivebreastfeeding rate otherwise rate of continued breastfeeding (oneyear) is low. A sufficient high rate on complementary feeding isestablished as well as early introduction of semi-solid foods. Theprevalence of underweight is high and classified as serious wasting.
Enuresis profile in 6-7 year-old children at five elementary schools in Sario district, Manado Umboh, Adrian; Malonda, Astrid A.; Sudjono, T. A.
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 47 No 6 (2007): November 2007
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (283.005 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi47.6.2007.261-4

Abstract

Background Enuresis is inappropriate urination by a child whohas reached an age which bladder control is expected. The etiologyis unknown, but some factors influence it.Objective To identify enuresis profiles in 6-7 year-old children.Methods It was a descriptive prospective study at five elementaryschools in Sario district Manado from May to September 2005.Data were obtained by questionnaires.Results Out of 63 children with enuresis, 67% aged 6 years, 57%were male, 37% had enuresis more than 4 times a month, 64%had enuresis more than 8 times a day. No one had complaint ofurinary tract infection. Most cases (70%) had enuresis since birth,51% of cases got toilet training at the age of 3-4 years old. Noneof enuretic children had divorced parents. Nocturnal enuresisoccurred in 81% of cases, 54% of cases had 4 family members,30% of cases had family history of enuresis.Conclusions Enuresis in 6-7 year old children is most commonlyseen in boys. Enuresis mostly happens for more than 4 times in amonth with urination more than 8 times a day. There is nocomplaint of urinary tract infection. Most of the cases haveenuresis during nighttime. Toilet training starts by the age 3-4years old. Most cases had enuresis since birth. They came from afamily with 4 family members, and in most situation no familyhistory of enuresis is found.
Quality of general movements: A valuable tool for the assessment of neurological integrity in young infants Putranti, Alifiani H.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 47 No 6 (2007): November 2007
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (303.803 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi47.6.2007.290-4

Abstract

Brain development and its significance for neurological diagnosis in infancy.
Prevalence of HBsAg positive among non- immunized junior high school students in Bandung K., Lia Marlia; Alfa, Yasmar; Martiza, Iesje; Prasetyo, Dwi
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 47 No 6 (2007): November 2007
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (335.974 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi47.6.2007.252-5

Abstract

Background Sero-epidemiologic survey of hepatitis B is used todetermine the prevalence of hepatitis B infection in community,particularly among population which has not been covered byhepatitis B immunization program.Objective To determine the prevalence of HBsAg positive amongjunior high school’s students in Bandung.Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted on junior high school(SMP) students. Subjects were selected randomly using stratifiedcluster sampling of 4 junior high schools in Bandung. The inclusioncriteria were students of first and second grade, lived in Bandungarea, without history of hepatitis B immunization. Subjects wereinterviewed and were screened for HBsAg using Reverse PassiveHemagglutination technique.Results There were 341 subjects consisted of 201 girls and 140boys. None of the subjects had any sexual intercourse or intravenousdrugs, while 261 subjects (76.5%) had shared personal care. Historyof blood transfusion was found in 13 subjects (3.8%), tattooing in2 (3.8%), body piercing in 28 (8.2%), and contact with chronicliver disease patients in 16 (4.7%). Based on HBsAg serologic test,3 subjects (2 boys and 1 girl) were found to be positive, thus HBsAgpositive prevalence was 0.9% (95%CI -0.001;0.019). Two of themhad shared personal care with their relatives or friends. None ofthem had tattoo, body pierce, blood transfusion, or contact withchronic liver disease patients. Their physical condition were withinnormal limit. One of them refused to do further laboratory testsbecause no permission from his parents. Liver function of thosestudents were normal, anti-HBc IgM were negative, and total anti-HBc were positive in two of them.Conclusion The prevalence of HBsAg positive in junior highschool students in Bandung is low and there is no obvious riskfactor for the transmission of the disease.
Benefits of gum arabic supplementation to oral rehydration solution in managing acute diarrhea Salwan, Hasri; Isnada, Isnada; Bakri, Achirul; Ismail, Rusdi; Bahar, Erial
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 47 No 6 (2007): November 2007
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (403.767 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi47.6.2007.265-9

Abstract

Background Oral rehydration solution (ORS) has been provensuccessfully to overcome dehydration in diarrhea. The improvementof the effectiveness of ORS is still needed to overcome some failures.Gum Arabic (GA), an indigestable starch, can enhance ORSabsorption in mice with diarrhea. It is worthy to explore its benefitsin human. Since GA is non toxic to human being, it is regardedethical to conduct effectiveness study directly in clinical setting.Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of GA supplementationto ORS in managing inpatients diarrheal cases .Methods A double blind clinical trial was conducted during Marchto September 2004 in the Department of Child Health of M. HoesinHospital, Palembang. The subjects were randomly enrolled to GA-ORS (GA) group or ORS (SO) group. Indirect measurements wereconducted on ORS absorptive enhancement by evaluating theduration of diarrhea after hospitalization, frequency of defecationduring hospitalization, ORS consumption during hospitalization,and time laps of stool consistency conversion. The effectivenessanalysis was controlled for confounders.Results Supplementation of 0.5 gram GA to 200 ml ORS could decreasethe duration of diarrhoea 15.65 hours (P=0.000) during hospitalisation,frequency of defecation during hospitalization 1.171 times/days(P=0.002), ORS consumption 38.39 ml/kg BW (P=0.029), time ofstool consistency to become semisolid 15.84 hours (P=0.000), andbecome solid 14.45 hours (P=0.002). Vomiting during hospitalizationand aged group of 6-11 months were significant confounder. However,after controlling the outcome with these confounding factors, thebenefits of GA supplementation were still significant.Conclusions GA supplementation to ORS significantly shortenthe duration of diarrhea, decreases the frequency of defecation,consumption of ORS, time of stool consistency to becomesemisolid and solid in inpatients diarrheal cases.
The influence of socioeconomic status and birth weight on blood pressure of Indonesian pre-pubertal children Julia, Madarina; van Weissenburch, M M; de Waal, HA Delemarrevan; Surjono, Achmad
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 47 No 6 (2007): November 2007
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (498.252 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi47.6.2007.270-7

Abstract

Background It has been shown that elevated blood pressure (BP)in childhood contributes to the development of coronary arterydisease, cerebrovascular accidents, heart failure, and renal failurein adults. There is also evidence of some correlations betweenchildhood BP and BP in adulthood. Obesity as well as low birthweight are a risk factors for elevated BP, both in children and inadults. Most epidemiological studies have also shown arelationship between high BP and socioeconomic status (SES).Objective To assess the influence of socioeconomic status andbirth weight on blood pressure of school-aged prepubertal childrenliving in Indonesia.Methods A cross-sectional survey on 2922 school-agedprepubertal children from the rural, poorurban and nonpoor urbancommunities was performed. Data on age, sex, stature, BMI, birthweight, systolic and diastolic BP were collected from all children.Results Overall and within every socioeconomic status group,blood pressures were positively associated with stature and bodymass index (BMI). Children from poor-socioeconomic families,i.e. rural and poor urban, had significantly lower height and BMI,and hence, in the unadjusted analyses, poor socioeconomic statuswas associated with lower systolic and diastolic BP. However, afteradjustment for age, sex, stature and BMI, rural children were foundto have significantly higher systolic BP compared to nonpoor urbanchildren, with regression coefficient (95% CI) of 1.19(0.42 to1.96). Birth weight was not associated with blood pressure inchildhood.Conclusion This study indicated that for a given stature and BMI,poor children had a higher systolic BP
The role of electroencephalography in neonatal seizures Handryastuti, Setyo; van Huffelen, A C
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 47 No 6 (2007): November 2007
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (473.331 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi47.6.2007.295-302

Abstract

This paper gives an overview of the important role of EEG in detection, classification, management and prognosis of neonatal seizures.
Treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome in secondary surfactant deficiency in neonates Samudro, Heru; Winarno, Winarno
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 47 No 6 (2007): November 2007
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (267.348 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi47.6.2007.303-6

Abstract

In this report we present data of three premature infants who received 1 to 2 doses of surfactant for an acute respiratory deterioration and after initial surfactants treatment for RDS.
Inflammatory bowel disease in Indonesian children Hegar, Badriul; Ananta, Yovita; Rini, Diah
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 47 No 6 (2007): November 2007
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (437.307 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi47.6.2007.307-12

Abstract

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a term usedto describe two disorders associated withgastrointestinal inflammation: Crohn’s disease(CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). The incidenceof IBD is higher in developed countries, while there isunpublished data of pediatric IBD in Indonesia.Clinical manifestations of IBD vary, consist ofgastrointestinal (such as diarrhea and abdominal pain)and extraintestinal manifestations. Definite diagnosisof IBD is based on endoscopy and histopathology. Themanagement includes pharmacotherapy, nutrition,surgery, and psychotherapy. This disorder has a highrecurrence rate, where CD’s recurrence rate is higherthan UC.1,2

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