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Paediatrica Indonesiana
ISSN : 00309311     EISSN : 2338476X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
Paediatrica Indonesiana is a medical journal devoted to the health, in a broad sense, affecting fetuses, infants, children, and adolescents, belonged to the Indonesian Pediatric Society. Its publications are directed to pediatricians and other medical practitioners or researchers at all levels of health practice throughout the world.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 12 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 48 No 3 (2008): May 2008" : 12 Documents clear
Antigenic differences between wildtype measles viruses and vaccine viruses in Indonesia Setiawan, Made; Sjahrurachman, Agus; Ibrahim, Fera; Suwandono, Agus
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 48 No 3 (2008): May 2008
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (245.696 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi48.3.2008.125-35

Abstract

Background Measles virus has a single, negative strand RNAgenome which codes 6 structural proteins: N, F, P M, H and L.Currently there are several variances in the nucleotide sequencesof N, F, M and H genes across wild type measles viruses, hencemeasles viruses can be categorized into clades and genotypes. Theantigenicity of the previous genotype of measles is different fromthe current genotype.Objective To determine the antigenic differences between wildtype measles virus and measles vaccine virus.Methods Analysis of the antigenic differences between wild typevirus (G2, G3 and D9) and vaccine virus (CAM-70 and Schwarz)was performed by immunizing mice with the respective viruses.The serum was then tested with micro-cross-neutralizationtechnique using the G2, G3, D9 and CAM-70 virus. Tests withcross ELISA examination technique were also performed usingthe same set of virus.Results Analysis of the cross neutralization test and cross ELISAshowed that the highest antigenicity reaction was found betweenwild type virus with antibody against wild type virus, while thelowest reaction was between wild type virus with antibody againstCAM-70.Conclusions We conclude that the antigenicity of antigenic proteinfrom wild type virus is higher than antigenicity of vaccine virusprotein. In addition, it was found that the antigenicity of proteinsfrom Schwarz vaccine virus was higher than proteins CAM-70vaccine virus.
Surgical aspects of arachnoid cysts: report of 3 cases and brief review Wahjoepramono, Eka J.
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 48 No 3 (2008): May 2008
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (4063.387 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi48.3.2008.186-92

Abstract

This paper reports two cases with surgicalintervention and another case with non-surgicaltreatment.
Relationship between lipid profiles with carotid intima--media thickness in children with type I diabetes mellitus Sukardi, Rubiana; Madiyono, Bambang; Sastroasmoro, Sudigdo; Batubara, Jose RL
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 48 No 3 (2008): May 2008
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (251.541 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi48.3.2008.147-51

Abstract

Background The major cause of morbidity and mortality inpatients with type I diabetes mellitus is premature and extensiveartherosclerosis. Carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) isassociated with cardivascular risk factors and has been used as amarker of early artherosclerosis process.Objective To determine IMT of carotid artery and its relationshipwith duration of diabetes, lipid profiles, and mean HbA 1 level.Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted on patientswith type 1 DM at the Department of Child Health CiptoMangunkusumo Hospital. Ultrasound B-mode imaging wasperformed to measure the IMT. Age-matched non-diabteticsubjects served as controls. Statistical significant was assumedat P<O.S.Results The mean IMT values of type I DM patients aged < 12years, 12-18 years, 18+ years were 0.44 (SD 0.03) mm; 0.46(SD 0.01) mm; 0.51 (SD 0.01) mm, respectively, which weresignificantly greater than those of age-matched non-diabeticsubjects which were 0.39 (SD 0.01), 0.41 (SD 0.01) mm, 0.46(SD 0.01) mm, respectively. Patients with type I DM had ahigher apolipoprotein-Band HDL cholesterol levels than in non-diabetic subjects. Multiple regression analysis showed that therewas no relationship between total cholesterol, cholesterol LDL,chronic hyperglycemia (HbA 1) and IMT. However, IMT in typeI diabetes was linearly related with duration of diabetes .Conclusion Type I DM patients have greater IMT and highermean apolipoprotein B. There is a strong correlation betweenIMT and duration of diabetes.
Correlation between nosocomial pneumonia and ventilated patients in pediatric intensive care unit Dewi, Cahya; Suryantoro, Purnomo; Naning, Roni
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 48 No 3 (2008): May 2008
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (178.817 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi48.3.2008.170-4

Abstract

Background NP (NP) especially YAP (ventilator-associated pneu-monia) is the most common infection in intensive care unit, whichcorrelates with the increasing of morbidity and mortality. Thereare some risk factors for development ofNP, the most importantone is duration of mechanical ventilator and reintubation.Objective To determine the correlation between NP and use ofmechanical ventilator in pediatric intensive care unit (PICU).Methods A matched case control study was conducted at Dr.Sardjito Hospital on all patients admitted to the PICU from2004 until 2006. Case group was defined as all patients who hadNP; age and sex matched control group included all patients notdiagnosed as NP. Statistical analysis was done by using chi-squareand t-tests as appropriate. Logistic regression analysis was doneto determine the role of risk factors.Results One-hundred and forty-one patients were included inthis study. The incidence of NP was 25. 7%. There was associa-tion between using mechanical ventilator (OR 1.08; 95%CI 1.07;8.20, P=0.036) and duration of using mechanical ventilator morethan four days (OR 1.75, 95%CI 1.87;18.02) with developmentof NP. There was a significant difference in event free survival ofNP between those using mechanical ventilator group and thosenot using mechanical ventilator group (P<O.OOl).Conclusion There is an association between the use of mechani-cal ventilator and duration of use of mechanical ventilator morethan four days with the development of NP
Comparison of minimal inhibitory and bactericidal capacity of oral penicillin V with benzathine penicillin G to Streptococcus beta--hemolyticus group A in children with rheumatic heart disease Iskandar, Burhanuddin; Madiyono, Bambang; Sastroasmoro, Sudigdo; Putra, Sukman T.; Djer, Mulyadi M.; Karuniawati, Anis
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 48 No 3 (2008): May 2008
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (233.281 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi48.3.2008.152-5

Abstract

Background Injection ofbenzatine penicillin G (BPG) every 28days is still the drug of choice for secondary prevention of rheu-matic heart disease (RHD). BPG sometimes poses problems dueto pain at the injection site, possible anaphylaxis, and is not alwaysavailable. Some centers choose oral penicillin over BPG.Objectives To compare minimal inhibitory capacity (MIC) andminimal bactericidal capacity (MBC) of oral penicillin V serumwith those of BPG among SGA infected RHD.Methods This was a clinical trial with crossover design study tocompare MIC of penicillin V and BPG. Outcome measures wereMIC and MBC. Statistical analysis was performed using pairedt-test and wilcoxon test.Result There were 32 subjects consisted of 17 males and 15females. The mean value of MIC and MBC serum of penicillinV were 0.031 and 0.125. The mean value of MIC and MBCserum of BPG3 were 0.094 and 0.031. Respectively the MICof penicillin V was similar to that of BPGy The mean value ofMIC and MBC of BPG4 were 0.125 and 0.250. Respectively theMIC of penicillin V was significantly higher than that of BPG 4.The MBC of penicillin V was significantly higher than that ofBPG 4. The MIC ofBPG 3 was similar to that ofBPG 4• The MBCof BPG 3 was similar to that of BPG 4.Conclusions The MIC of penicillin V was similar to that ofBPG 3,the MBC of oral penicillin V was higher than that ofBPG 3• TheMIC and MBC of penicillin V was higher than those of BPG 4.
Risk factors of cerebral palsy in the perinatal period Gunarwati, Santi; Patria, S. Yudha; Julia, Madarina
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 48 No 3 (2008): May 2008
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (175.704 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi48.3.2008.175-9

Abstract

Background Cerebral palsy is an irreversible yet preventablecondition, thus it is necessary to know the risk factors of thedisease. The potential risk factors that are found in the perinataland neonatal period i.e. asphyxia, sepsis, very low birth weight,premature birth, and neonatal seizure. No available data for therisk factors of cerebral palsy in Indonesia.Objective To identify the perinatal risk factors in cerebral palsy.Methods We performed an age and sex-matched nested case-control study. The case group was children with cerebral palsywho were born at Sardjito Hospital during 1997-2005. The controlgroup was selected from the same population as the case group.Risk factors during the perinatal period consisted of asphyxia,sepsis, very low birth weight, premature birth and neonatal seizure.Logistic regression was used to determine the association betweenrisk factors and cerebral palsy.Results Univariate analysis showed that the following factors wererisk factors for cerebral palsy, i.e., asphyxia (OR 5.6, 95%CI 2.48;12.53); premature birth (OR 4.5; 95%CI 1.55; 13.13); and neona-tal seizure (OR 7.5, 95%CI 3.13; 18.03). On multivariate analysisrisk factors associated with cerebral palsy were asphyxia (aOR6.3, 95%CI 2.42; 16.66) and neonatal seizure (aOR 10.9,95%CI4.03; 29.97).Conclusion Asphyxia and neonatal seizure are significant riskfactors of cerebral palsy in perinatal period
Effectiveness of synbiotics as laxative agent for constipation in children Hannah, Hannah; Juffrie, M.; Soenarto, S. Yati
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 48 No 3 (2008): May 2008
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (218.084 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi48.3.2008.136-41

Abstract

Background Constipation in children can cause serious problems.Laxative is needed for the management of constipation. Orallaxative has been used frequently, even though a safe oral laxativeagents for children is limited. Prebiotic and probiotic have alreadybeen proven to have laxative effect in constipation in children andadults. The effectiveness of these agents as a laxative has not beenproven yet.Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of laxative synbiotic inconstipation in children compared to that of fiber foods.Methods A randomized double blind controlled trial wasconducted on children aged 6 months-14 years old who sufferedfrom functional constipation at Dr. Sardjito Hospital, Dr. SoeradjiTirtonegoro Hospital, and Wates District Hospital from April2007-October 2007. Randomization was performed by computer. Theoutcome of recovery rate, onset therapy and side effects wereevaluated after seven days of intervention.Results Forty-three children were included in this study, but only41 could be analyzed. Subject characteristics in both groups werecomparable except for maternal educational level. The mainoutcome (recovery rate) was assessed by intention to treat principle.Compared with fiber foods, synbiotic increased the recovery ratewith RR 2.14 (95%CI 1.14; 4.02) and NNT 2.9 (95%CI 2; 15),whereas its therapeutic onset was 15 hours faster than that of fiberfoods. No important side effects were found in both groups.Conclusions Synbiotic is safe and effective in increasing therecovery rate of functional constipation with faster therapeuticonset than that of fiber foods.
Effect of classical music on reducing blood pressure in children Saing, Saloma Klementina; Rina, Oke; Ramayati, Rafita; Rusdidjas, Rusdidjas
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 48 No 3 (2008): May 2008
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (163.308 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi48.3.2008.142-6

Abstract

Background High blood pressure remains a public healthproblem. High blood pressure in children and adolescent is amajor risk for cardiovascular disease in adulthood which cancause high morbidity and mortality. Listening to the classicalmusic can be used as an alternative in reducing high bloodpressure.Objective To investigate the effect of classical music in reducingblood pressure in children with high normal blood pressure andor hypertension.Methods Eighty eight students of Sidorame Senior High SchoolMedan with blood pressure 2: 120/80 mmHg or blood pressure2: 90 percentile Task Force were included in this study. TheVivaldi's Four Seasons was played for 30 minutes using Sony stereocassette recorder and earphone. The students' blood pressure weremeasured after listening to the music.Results The reduction of students' blood pressure in the classicalmusic group was greater than control group (L'ISBP, L'IDBP9.4lmmHg, 6.05mmHg versus 4.37mmHg, 2.23mmHg) andshowed statistically difference.Conclusion Listening to the classical music can reduce bloodpressure in children with high blood pressure.
Factors associated with the intention to exclusively breastfeed at Siloam Lippo Cikarang Hospital Dewanto, Naomi; Sastroasmoro, Sudigdo; Suradi, Rulina; Santi, Theresia
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 48 No 3 (2008): May 2008
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (174.87 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi48.3.2008.156-60

Abstract

Background World Health Organization (WHO) recommendsbreastfeeding as the appropriate method of infant feeding.Predelivery intentions about breastfeeding are strong predictorsof both initiating and continuing exclusively breastfeedingthrough the post delivery period.Objective To determine the association of age, education,occupation, parity, and information got by pregnant women withthe intention to give exclusive breastfeeding at Siloam LippoCikarang Hospital.Methods Pregnant women were chosen by consecutive samplingfilled in questionnaires contained identity, knowledge, obstacles ofbreastfeeding and intentions to exclusively breastfeed. Pregnantwomen visiting Obstetrics and Gynecologic Department SiloamLippo Cikarang Hospital who were able to read and write inIndonesian were eligible for this study.Result: Most of the 200 respondents were between 20-30 years ofage (69.5%), college graduated (55.5%), working women (50.5%),multiparous (58.5%) and have already got the informationabout breastfeeding (64.5%). The commonly cited source isprinted device (40%). Knowledge about breastfeeding in generalwere good (78%), but respondents who intended to exclusivelybreastfeed were only 58.5%. Multivariate analysis showed thatthe factors significant associated with the intention to exclusivelybreastfeed were age, with OR 0.9 (95%CI 0.84;0.98, P<0.05) andinformation, with OR 0.28 (95%CI 0.143;0.56, P<O.OOl)Conclusions The significant influencing factors to the intentionsto give exclusively breastfeed are age and information.
Risk factors of developmental delay: a community-based study Sitaresmi, Mei Neni; Ismail, Djauhar; Wahab, Abdul
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 48 No 3 (2008): May 2008
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (168.314 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi48.3.2008.161-5

Abstract

Background Developmental delay is a common problem inchildren. Early detection of this disorders is mandatory in orderto provide early interventions. Identification of the risk factors isimportant for strategic intervention.Objective To identify risk factors of developmental delay inchildren under five years old.Metlwds A community-based study of developmental screeningwas conducted, in Bambanglipuro, Bantul district, Province ofYogyakarta, between September and October 2007. Developmentalscreening was performed using a Kuesioner Pra Skrining Perkembangan(KPSP).Results Out of 632 children aged 3 to 60 months, 407 (64%) hadnormal development, 81 (28%) doubtful and 43 (8%) suspecteddevelopmental delay. A number of factors identified as the riskof suspected developmental delay were undernourished (OR 2.3,95%CI 1.1 ; 4.8) , low birth weight (OR 2.6, 95%CI 1.1 ; 6.1), loweducational level of mother (O R 2.5, 95%CI 1.3; 4.9) , workingmother (O R 1.8, 95%CI 1; 3.5), and poor socio-economic status(SES) families (OR 2.7, 95%CI 1.3; 5.4). Multivariate logisticregression analysis showed that poor SES was the strongest riskfactor of suspected developmental delay (adjusted OR 2.8, 95%CI1.4;5.7) .Conclusions Poverty, low maternal educational level andintrauterine malnutrition during as well as malnutrition duringinfant period are risk factors of developmental delay. Integratedstrategies should be conducted to solve the problems to preventmore children suferred from developmental delay.

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