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Paediatrica Indonesiana
ISSN : 00309311     EISSN : 2338476X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
Paediatrica Indonesiana is a medical journal devoted to the health, in a broad sense, affecting fetuses, infants, children, and adolescents, belonged to the Indonesian Pediatric Society. Its publications are directed to pediatricians and other medical practitioners or researchers at all levels of health practice throughout the world.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 11 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 49 No 1 (2009): January 2009" : 11 Documents clear
Relationship between newborn mid-upper-arm circumference and birth weight Taufiq, Muhammad Anwar; Madjid, Djauriah A.; Lisal, J. S.; Daud, Dasril
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 49 No 1 (2009): January 2009
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (123.635 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi49.1.2009.11-4

Abstract

Background  Recording  an  accurate  birth  weight  by  primaryhealth care workers has been a problem in rural areas, leadingto a search  for  an alternative, inexpensive, age independent andnoninvasive method to predict neonatal well being. Mid-upper-armcircumference (MUAC) might be  an  alternative anthropometricmeasurement useful  to  estimate the state of nutrition.Objective  To  evaluate  the  relationship  between  MUAC  andbirth weight  in  low birth weight (LBW) and normal birth weight(NBW) infants.Methods  We  measured birth weight and  MUAC  of  newbornbabies  of  various gestational ages  at  Siti Fatimah Maternity  andChildren's Hospital  and  Dr.  Wahidin Sudirohusodo  GeneralHospital, Makassar,  South  Sulawesi, Indonesia.  Correlationtests and diagnostic accuracy using different cut-off points wereperformedResults There were 892 live birth newborns (117 LBW and  775NBW) included in the study.  The  sensitivity, specificity, positivepredictive value, and negative value  for  MUACs  of<  10.3  em  were94.9  %,  99.9%, 99.1%, and 99.2%, respectively.  The  sensitivity,specificity, positive predictive value, and negative value  for  MUAC< 10.4  em  were 99.1  %,  99.6%, 97.5%, and 99.9%, respectively.The  sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negativevalue for MUAC < 10.5  em  were 100%,99.4%, 95.9%, and 100%,respectively.Conclusion  There  is  a strong correlation between  MUAC  andbirth weight. Birth weight can be predicted with the followingequation: Birth weight= -1776.383  +  (416.95 newborn  MUACvalue).  The  optimal cut-off point  for  the newborn MUAC value  forLBW infants  is<  10.5 em.
Efficacy of dioctahedral smectite in infants with acute diarrhea: a double blind randomized controlled trial Widiasa, A. A. Made; Soetjiningsih, Soetjiningsih; Karyana, Putu Gede
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 49 No 1 (2009): January 2009
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (113.069 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi49.1.2009.48-53

Abstract

Background  Acute  diarrhea  is  a sudden diarrhea which lasts lessthan  seven days  on  babies and children.  The  standard  treatmentby  WHO  in managing acute diarrhea  is  still  not  satisfactory forparents whose infants and children suffering from the disease.Dioctahedral  smectite  is  expected  to  decrease  the  volume,frequency, and duration  of  diarrhea.Objective  To  assess the clinical effects  of  dioctahedral smectite ininfants with acute diarrhea.Methods  A double-blind, randomized clinical controlled trial wasperformed on six to  12  months-old infants who were hospitalizedin Sanglah Hospital, Denpasar due to acute diarrhea .The subjectswere divided into two groups.  The  treatment  group was givenstandard  management  with  adjuvant  dioctahedral  smectitewhile  and  control group was given standard management withplacebo.Results  From  68  infants enrolled in this study, the  mean  durationof  diarrhea was significantly shorter in treatment group comparedto placebo group  [39.03  hours (SD  2.03)  vs  70.58  hours (SD3.78),  mean  difference  31.6 (95%  CI  22.90  to  40.19), P=0.001].The  RRR was  50%,  and  ARR  was  29%.  Kaplan-Meier survivalanalysis showed  that  duration  of  acute diarrhea was shorter intreatment  group  [36  hours (SD  1.7)  versus 72 hours (SD  4.18),mean difference  36.0 (95%  CI  21.81  to  50.19),  log rank test,P<0.0001].  In multivariate Cox regression analysis, it was foundthat  dioctahedral smectite influenced the duration  of  diarrheain infants with acute diarrhea  [OR  4.403 (95%  CI  2.39  to  8.12),P<O.OOOl].Conclusion  Dioctahedral smectite  can  shorten the duration  ofacute diarrhea.
Comparison of peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) before and after physical exercise in obese and non-obese children Siregar, Febrina Z.; Panggabean, Gabriel; Daulay, Ridwan M.; Lubis, Helmi M.
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 49 No 1 (2009): January 2009
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (104.458 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi49.1.2009.20-4

Abstract

Background  Obesity  has  been  associated  with  respiratorycomplications  and  it  is  believed to reduce lung volume. Obesityimposes additional stress on  ventilation  during exercise  andmay even result in pulmonary function impairment. Exerciseinduced-bronchospasm has also been found in obese children.Lung function tests  can  be useful to confirm diagnosis, responseto therapy, or prediction of lung and respiratory diseases.  Thepeak  flow  meter  is  an  inexpensive, practical  way  to measure lungfunction, and  can  detect the early warning signs  of  a decrease inlung function.Objective  To  compare the peak expiratory  flow  rate (PEFR) beforeand after physical exercise in obese and non-obese primary schoolboys aged 6 to  12  years old.Methods  A quasi-experimental study using the one group pretest-posttest design was performed  on  30  obese children  (BMI  abovethe  95<h  percentile)  and  30 non-obese children  (BMI  betweenthe  5<h  - 85'h percentile) using a mini-Wright peak  flow  meterto evaluate the PEFR before  and  after eight minutes  of  physicalexercise. Height, weight, body mass index,  and  physical statuswere determined before testing.Results  The  PEFR before  and  after exercise were 14.80 for obesechildren and 9.76 for non-obese children.  The  mean value forPEFR between obese and non-obese children was significantlydifferent  (P<0.05).Conclusion  The  PEFR for obese children  is  significantly lowerthan  non  obese children  even  before physical exercise.
Role of multidetector spiral CT scanning for pulmonary embolism confirmation in a child with pulmonary hypertension: a case report Nataprawira, Heda Melinda; Rahayuningsih, Sri Endah; Afandi, Nono Sumarna; Firman, Armijn; Koan, Tan Siauw
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 49 No 1 (2009): January 2009
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (191.806 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi49.1.2009.54-8

Abstract

Pulmonary embolism (PE)  is  associated withconsiderable morbidity and mortality. Earlydiagnosis and prompt treatment  is  essential,  1 • 2however PE  is  rarely clinically diagnosed ortreated in children. Most clinically significant  PE  is  notrecognized antemortem. 3  While its diagnosis remainsa challenge  as  the signs and symptoms  can  often benon-specific,  an  accurate diagnosis  is  essential for themanagement  of  this disease. It  is  known  that  a numberof  non-invasive diagnostic tools are available for itsdetection nowadays. 1 • 2 .4  Even though multi-detectorspiral, also called helical,  CT  scanning  is  promisingand has  been  proven to be useful  in  diagnosing thiscondition with high sensitivity  and  specificity, 5  it  isunavailable even  in  referral hospitals  in  Indonesia.The  gold  standard,  pulmonary  angiography,  isconsidered  as  the procedure of choice to diagnose PE,but  unfortunately it  is  invasive. Failure to diagnose PEaccurately and promptly  can  result in excess morbidityand  death  due to pulmonary hypertension (PH) andrecurrent venous thromboembolic events. Conversely,unnecessary  anticoagulation  therapy poses a riskwithout any benefit.2
Detection of the jaundice-related G71R mutation in the UGT1A1 gene by denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) Sutomo, Retno; Hapsara, Sunartini; Patria, Suryono Yudha; Nakamura, Hajime
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 49 No 1 (2009): January 2009
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (172.816 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi49.1.2009.1-6

Abstract

Background  The  G71R mutation in the UGT1A1 gene has  beenassociated with neonatal jaundice  and  other  cases  of  hereditary,unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia in several Asian populations.Currently,  DNA  sequencing  is  the  only  method  available  toidentify the mutation, which can be time- and  labor-intensive,particularly for such projects  as  population-based genetic studies.A relatively new method, denaturing high performance liquidchromatography (DHPLC),  is  increasingly used to  detect  variousmutations.Objective  The  aim  of  the present study was to investigate theability of DHPLC to  detect  the G71R mutation, in comparisonwith the gold standard of sequencing analysis.Methods Seventy-two infants were enrolled. Following genomicDNA  extraction, exon 1 of the UGT1A1 gene was amplified  bypolymerase chain reaction (PCR). Afterwards, the G71R mutationwas simultaneously,  and  blindly, determined in all subjects  byDHPLC and sequence analysis.  The  performance  of  the DHPLCanalysis, compared  to  the sequence analysis, was assessed in termsof  sensitivity  and  specificity.Results DHPLC detected the G71 R mutation in  31  individuals.Of  these,  26  were heterozygous and 5 were homozygous for themutation. This method did not find the mutation in  41  otherindividuals. Sequence analysis produced identical results for allindividuals.Conclusion DHPLC analysis  is  capable  of  detecting the G71Rmutation  in  the  UGT1A1  with  a degree  of  sensitivity  andspecificity  (100%  each)  that  is  comparable to sequencing analysis.
Quality of home stimulation and language development in children aged 12-24 months living in orphanages and family homes Mulyadi, Yuridyah P.; Soedjatmiko, Soedjatmiko; Pusponegoro, Hardiono D.
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 49 No 1 (2009): January 2009
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (117.24 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi49.1.2009.25-32

Abstract

Background  Language development  is  fundamental for children'sintellectual development. Therefore, early stimulation in thefirst  three  years  of  life play an  important  role especially indisadvantaged communities such  as  foster homes.Objective  To  determine  the  quality  of  home stimulation  andlanguage development, and their correlations in children livingin orphanages  and  family homes.Methods  This study was conducted between December  2007  andJanuary  2008.  Subjects were recruited from several orphanagesin Jakarta, Tangerang, Bogor, also three posyandus in Jakarta andTangerang.  The  quality  of  home stimulation was assessed usingHome  Stimulation  Observation  for  the  Measurement  of  theEnvironment (HOME) scores, while language development wasassessed using Clinical Linguistic and Auditory Milestone ScaleDevelopment  Quotient  (CLAMS  DQ).Results  A total  of  80  healthy children, consisting  of  40  childrenin orphanages  and  40  in family homes were enrolled. Inadequatestimulation and language delay were found  to  be significantlyhigher in the orphanage group  (52.5%  vs.  27.5%; P=0.022  and57.5%  vs.  10%; P<0.001,  respectively).  HOME  Scores  andCLAMS  DQ  were also significantly lower in  the  orphanagegroup compared to those  in  the family home group  (25.6  vs31.5; P<0.001  and  84.0  vs  110.7; P=0.002).  Logistic regressionrevealed  that  caregiver-child  attachment  time was  the  onlyrisk factor  for  language delay  (OR  32.32; P<0.0001),  in  bothorphanages and family homes.Result  The  quality of home stimulation  is  lower in the orphanages,which results in a higher rate  of  language delay  in  children aged12-24  months.
Inverse association between positive tuberculin tests and positive allergy skin tests in children Rochmah, Nur; Kuntartiwi, Dyahris; Endaryanto, Anang; Harsono, Aryanto
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 49 No 1 (2009): January 2009
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (96.142 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi49.1.2009.7-10

Abstract

Background  The  association between  Mycobacterium  tuberculosisinfection  and  atopy remains controversial. Reaction to tuberculosisinfection  is  mediated  by  Th-1  immune responses whereas allergicreactions are mediated  by  Th- 2 immune response. In patients withatopic syndrome who also suffer from tuberculosis infection,  theTh-2  response will be suppressed  and  allergy manifestations willdecrease. Therefore, it  is  important to determine the appropriateallergy test and to predict outcome after completing tuberculosistreatment.Objective  To  evaluate the influence  of  a positive tuberculin teston  skin test results in diagnosing atopic disease.Methods  A cross sectional study was  conducted  in  the  pediatricallergy  outpatient  clinic, Soetomo Hospital, Surabaya, Indonesiabetween 2004  and  2007. Eighty-five patients were enrolled inthis study.  The  tuberculin test was performed  on  all patientswith allergy.  The  allergy test was carried  out  by  performing a skinscratch test.Results  There  was a weak inverse correlation between positivetuberculin tests and positive allergy skin tests in children (housedust  mite, food  and  pet  allergies).  The  correlation between apositive  tuberculin  test  and  house  dust  mite allergy test wasr:  -0.364  (P=O.OOl;  a=O.Ol).  The  correlation  between  thetuberculin  test  and  food allergies was  r:  -0.420  (P=O.OOl;a=O.Ol).  The  correlation between the tuberculin test  and  petallergies was  r:  -0.344  (P=  0.001;  a=O.Ol).Conclusions  A positive tuberculin test  is  weakly correlated withpositive allergy skin test results, suggesting  that  it  is  appropriate  todo allergy skin testing even in children with a positive tuberculintest.
Comparison of blood glucose levels in breastfed vs. formula-fed low birth weight infants Pangaribuan, Eli Tua; Lubis, Bugis M.; Sianturi, Pertin; Azlin, Emil; Tjipta, Guslihan D.
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 49 No 1 (2009): January 2009
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (108.771 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi49.1.2009.15-9

Abstract

Background  Low  birth weight infants are defined  as  babies withbirth weight less  than  2500 grams.  Low  birth weight infants tendto suffer from hypoglycemia compared to full term infants.  Theincidence  of  hypoglycemia in newborns varies between 1.3 and  3per 1000 live births. Blood glucose levels in formula-fed infantsare lower  than  those in breastfed infants.Objective  To  compare blood glucose levels in breastfed  andformula-fed low birth weight infants.Methods  A cross sectional study was conducted between February2007  and  June 2007  at  Pirngadi and H. Adam Malik GeneralHospital in Medan,  North  Sumatra, Indonesia. All low birthweight babies were classified into two groups: the breastfed  andformula-fed. Each group consisted  of  32 infants. Capillary bloodwas collected using heel pricks  at  1,  48,  and  72 hours after birth,and plasma glucose was evaluated using the Glucotrend2 bloodglucose test.Results  The  breastfed low birth weight infants had significantlyhigher blood glucose levels (P=0.002)  than  formula-fed low birthweight infants. Mode of delivery  was  related to blood glucose level.Infant delivered  by  caesarean section had significantly differentblood glucose levels  at  1 hour  (P=0.005)  and  72  hours afterbirth (P=0.027).  The  full-term infants had significantly higherblood glucose level (P=0.007)  than  the small for gestational ageinfants.Conclusions  Generally,  low  birth weight infants have hypoglycemiaafter first hour  of  delivery. Breastfed low birth weight infants havehigher blood glucose levels  than  formula-fed low birth weightinfants.
Blood nickel level and its toxic effect after transcatheter closure of persistent duct arteriosus using Amplatzer duct occluder Djer, Mulyadi M.; Madiyono, Bambang
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 49 No 1 (2009): January 2009
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (113.217 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi49.1.2009.33-8

Abstract

Background  Transcatheter closure using amplatzer  duct  occluder(ADO)  is  currently the  treatment  of  choice for  patent  ductusarteriosus (PDA).  The  ADO  device  is  constructed from a Nitinolwire mesh containing 55% nickel. Up  to  now, there  is  still acontroversy about the effects  of  nickel contained in ADO.Objectives  To  determine blood nickel level  at  six months aftertranscatheter closure  of  PDA  using  ADO,  toxic effects  of  nickelat six months after  PDA  closure using  ADO,  and the effects  ofnickel  on  complete blood  count  (CBC), blood glucose and renalfunction.Methods  Subjects  were  patients  with  PDA  at  IntegratedCardiovascular Services,  Dr.  Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital,Jakarta. Routine blood test and blood nickel levels were measuredat  the time  of  the procedure,  and  at  the  end  of  the first, third,  andsixth months after intervention.Results  There  were  29  patients who underwent heart catheteri-zation  and  PDA closure using  ADO.  A time series analysis wasconducted  on  23  patients who completed six-month follow-upafter the intervention. Median blood nickel level before procedurewas 58 ng/mL while  at  one, three  and  six months afterwards were60, 63 and 64 ng/mL respectively.  The  blood nickel levels didnot  differ significantly between pre- and  post-ADO. After  PDAclosure,  no  toxic effects  of  nickel were found,  both  clinically andlaboratorically.Conclusions  PDA  closure using  ADO  has no effects  on  the nickellevels, CBC, blood glucose and renal function;
The somatic growth pattern of preterm infants until term age Andhita, Ida Bagus; Soetjianingsih, Soetjianingsih; Retayasa, I. Wayan
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 49 No 1 (2009): January 2009
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (125.369 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi49.1.2009.39-47

Abstract

Background  Pre term infants contribute substantially to neonatalmorbidity  and  mortality rates. Somatic growth  is  consideredto be  an  important indicator  of  an  infant's health status.  Themeasurement parameters include body weight (BW), body length(BL), head circumference (HC), and ponderal index (PI). Specificdata  on  the somatic growth pattern  of  preterm infants in Indonesiaare unavailable.Objectives  To  identify the somatic  pattern  of  preterm infantsuntil term age  and  the influence  of  gender, nutrition, and nursingmethod  on  BW,  BL,  HC,  and  PI growth during the first week  oflife.Methods  We  recruited premature infants born in Sanglah Hopsital,Denpasar, Bali,  and  collected data  on  BW,  BL,  HC,  and  PI>All  data  were presented  as  mean (SD)  and  plotted in curves.The  relationships among several factors and the somatic growthparameters were analyzed with  ANOV  A.  The  level  of  significancewas set  at  P  <  0.05.Results  Among  100  infants, significant differences were detectedin  the  mean  ofBW,  BL,  HC, and PI, particularly in early preterminfants. Breastfed infants had the highest values with BW  2199grams (SD  198),  HC  31.4  em  (SD  1.71),  and PI  2.48  grams/cm 3(SD  0.36).  Infants nursed with the kangaroo method had thehighest values  of  BW  [2450  grams (SD  259)]  and  BL  [48  em(SD  2.34)].Conclusion  A significant difference was  detected  in somaticgrowth according to some parameters, particularly in the earlypreterm infants group. Thus, breast feeding and the kangaroomethod contribute to better somatic growth, and specifically BW.

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