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Paediatrica Indonesiana
ISSN : 00309311     EISSN : 2338476X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
Paediatrica Indonesiana is a medical journal devoted to the health, in a broad sense, affecting fetuses, infants, children, and adolescents, belonged to the Indonesian Pediatric Society. Its publications are directed to pediatricians and other medical practitioners or researchers at all levels of health practice throughout the world.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 11 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 50 No 3 (2010): May 2010" : 11 Documents clear
Correlation between hyperbilirubinemia in term infants and developmental delay in 2-4 year-old children Wilar, Rocky; Masloman, Nurhayati; Lestari, Hesti; Tjeng, William Stephenson
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 50 No 3 (2010): May 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi50.3.2010.154-8

Abstract

Background Up to 50 percent of term newborns have clinical jaundice during the first week of life. Many infants with bilirubin encephalopathy were asymptomatic, but they show neurodevelopmental delay few years later. Toxic effect occurs if unbound unconjugated bilirubin penetrates blood brain barrier and causes neuronal death.Objective To investigate the relationship between moderate hyperbilirubinemia in tenn infants and developmental delay in 2- 4 year-old children.Methods A retrospective cohort study was performed usingmedical record of infants born between 2006-2007 in Division of Neonatology Prof. R.D. Kandoll General Hospital, Manado. Data from the medical record consisted of weeks of gestation, birth weight, Apgar scores, diagnosis of sepsis, congenital anomalies. Tenn infants with appropriate weight for gestational age were visited at their home to undergo developmental screening by Denver II and Vineland Social Maturity Scale test.Results Fifty one children enrolled in this study (26 children with hyperbilirubinemia and 25 without  hyperbilirubinemia) consisted of 27 boys and 24 girls. Most children were 24 - 29 months old (24/51). The results of Vineland Social Maturity Scale test showed 14 children had delayed social maturation (10 Mth history of  hyperbilirubinemia). Denver II screening found 11 children had delayed language skill (10 Mth history of hyperbilirubinemia), 1 child Mth hyperbilirubinemia had delayed fine motoric and language skill.Conclusions T here is a relationship between moderate hyperbilirubinemia in tenn infants and developmental delay in 2 - 4 year old children.
Sleep patterns in 1 to 36 month-old children Sambo, Catharina; Sekartini, Rini; Trihono, Partini
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 50 No 3 (2010): May 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (132.879 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi50.3.2010.170-5

Abstract

Background Better understanding about sleep patterns inIndonesian children can contribute to basic knowledge foreducating parents and health providers about good sleephygiene.Objectives To find out sleep patterns in 1????36 month????oldchildren.Method A descriptive, cross????sectional study was held in EastJakarta on May 2009. Subjects were 1 to 36 months old childrenwho came \\lith their parents or primary caregivers. Data collectionwas performed using modified Brief Infant Sleep Questionnaire(BISQ), consisted of subjects' characteristics, sleep patterns, sleepproblems, and associating factors.Results Among 147 children, sleep problems were identified in33.3% of them. Bedtime was mostly at 8 p.m., wake up time was5 a.m. Median time needed to fall asleep was 20 minutes. Averagefrequency of night waking was twice during one night. Mediannight waking duration was 15 minutes. Median sleep duration atnight was 9 hours 20 minutes, and median nap duration was 2hours 20 minutes. Median total sleep time was 12 hours. Pronesleeping position was significantly associated \\lith sleep problems(p????0.036, RR????1.67, 95%CI????1.66-2.64).Conclusions Prevalence of sleep problem is 33.3%, \\lith awakeningat night was being the most occurring problem. Prone sleepingposition is associated \\lith sleep problems. [Paediatr Indones.2010;50:170-5].
Clinical characteristics and electroencephalography features of intractable childhood epilepsy - A case series Mangunatmadja, Irawan; Harmoniati, Eva Devita
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 50 No 3 (2010): May 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi50.3.2010.133-8

Abstract

Background The majority of epilepsy patients have good prognosis, but lOAO% will develop intractable epilepsy. Early identification of patients v.ith risks of developing intractable epilepsy allows more intensive therapy to be performed.Objective To study clinical characteristics and electroencephalography (EEG) features of intractable childhood epilepsy.Methods We reviewed children \lith intractable epilepsy attending the Pediatric Neurology and Growth and Development Clinic in Child Health Department, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital from 2005􀁏2008. EEG examination was perfonned in epilepsy patients who had consumed two or more antiepileptic drugs for at least 18 months but still experienced seizure at least once per month. Data of clinical characteristics were collected from the medical records and information provided by the parents.Results There were 41 subjects. Age of onset between o􀁏 1 year old was found in 50% subjects, neurological impainnent in 80%, microcephaly in 50%, and abnonnal neuroimaging in 14 of 24 subjects. Seizure manifestations were mostly generalized tonic clonic, tonic, my oclonic, and complex partial seizures. AbnonnalEEG features were found in 88% subjects and the majority showed generalized sloMng of the background activity. Focal and multifocal epileptifonn activity was found in 31 % and 28% subjects, respectively. Epileptifonn activity was located mostly in the frontal and temporal lobe.Conclusions Most patients Mth intractable epilepsy haveage of onset before the age of 1 year. A substantialpoportionof them have neurological impairment, microcephaly,abnonnal neuroimaging, and abnormal EEG features. Seizure manifestation ismostlygeneralized seizure. Epileptiform activity in intractable childhood epilepsy is often found in the frontal and temporal lobe. 
Nutritional status of school going children and adolescents aged 9-13 years at Haldia in West Bengal, India Banik, Sudip Datta; Chatterjee, Soumita
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 50 No 3 (2010): May 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi50.3.2010.159-65

Abstract

Background Malnutrition in children and adolescents is a global problem. In developing nations of Africa and Southeast Asia, the prevalence of undernutrition in children is very high. There is scanty data With respect to the nutritional status of school going children and adolescents, especially from sub􀁉urban and rural areas in India.Objective A study was undertaken among boys (n = 174) and girls (n = 128) aged 9􀁉 13 years in a sub􀁉urban area of Purba Medinipur district of West Bengal in India to understand age and sex variation of nutritional status of the subjects.Methods A cross􀁉sectional study among the school􀁉going children and adolescent aged 9􀁉 13 years was done during June􀁉September 2009 in Haldia.Results Age and sex variation of anthropometric characteristics (body mass index or BMI and conicity index or CI) revealed that remarkable sections of both the sexes were suffering from underweight (8.30%), stunting (14.60%) and wasting (2.80%). Significant sex differences were observed in cases of mean CI (P=O.OO1), weight􀁉for􀁉age z􀁉score (P = 0.0001) and weight-for-height ,-score (P 􀀂 0.0001).Discussion Besides notable prevalence of under nutrition in both sexes, situation of the girls is worse (underweight - 11.70% and stunting - 21.10%) compared to the boys. This is most evident among the subjects of both sexes aged 11 and 12 years.   
Sodium channels of SCNIA gene mutations in generalized epilepsy with febrile seizure plus (GEFS+) spectrum related to autism Herini, Elisabeth; Patria, Yudha; Gunadi, Gunadi; Yusoff, Surini; Harahap, Indra SAri Kusuma; Sunartini, Sunartini; Sutaryo, Sutaryo; Takada, Satoshi; Nishio, Hisahide
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 50 No 3 (2010): May 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (438.04 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi50.3.2010.125-32

Abstract

Background Mutations in the a-subunit of the first neuronalsodium channel gene SCNIA have been demonstrated forgeneralized epilepsy \\lith febrile seizures plus (GEFS+), severemyoclonic epilepsy in infancy (SMEI), and borderline SMEI(SMEB). SCNIA mutations are also described in patients 'Withpsychiatric disorders such as autism.Objective To identify the mutations of SCNIA gene in patientswith GEFS+ spectrum which may be related to autism.Methods We examined four patients v.ith autism and GEFS+spectrum who were admitted to the Department of Child Health,Sardjito Hospital, Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Diagnosis of autism wasbased on DSM????IV;ICD X criteria. Mutations in SCNIA wereidentified by PCRamplification and denaturing high????performanceliquid chromatography analysis, Mth subsequent sequencing.Results There were four patients, all boys, aged 1.8 year to 7 years.The phenotypes of epilepsy were GEFS+ in one patient, SMEBin one patient and SMEI in two patients. Sequencing analysisrevealed a G????to????A heterozygous transition which was detectedat nucleotide c.4834G>A (p.V1612I ) in exon 25. Other singlenucleotid polymorphisms (SNPs) were c.383 +66T>C in intron 2,c.603-91G>A and c.603-1060> T in intron 4, c.965-21C> T inintron 6, c.1028+21T>Cin intron 7, c.2173G>A in exon 12 andc. 2177-38C>A, c.2177-12delT, c.2176+44C> T in intron 12.Conclusion In this study, we reported the first cases Mth mutationin SCNIA gene in GEFS+ spectrum related to autistic patientsin Indonesian population, which showed a missense mutationp.V16121. [Paediatr lndones. 2010;50:125-32].
Obesity in children with frequent relapse and steroid dependent nephrotic syndrome Vidianty, Jeanne; Pardede, Sudung O.; Hendarto, Aryono; Akib, Arwin A. P.
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 50 No 3 (2010): May 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi50.3.2010.139-43

Abstract

Background Children \lith frequent relapse and steroid dependent nephrotic syndrome (FRNS/SDNS) will experience frequent relapse v.ith many complications due to the disease and toxicity of steroid therapy. One of the most common complications is obesity which is associated \lith significant health problems in childhood and important risk factor of adult morbidity and mortality. Objective To find out the prevalence of obesity in children With FRNS/SDNS.Methods A cross sectional study was conducted from November 2008 until March 2009. Data were collected from the medical records of children With FRNS/SDNS treated during the period of 2000-2008. Body weight, height and body fat mass measurement was performed on the subjects. The diagnosis of obesity was based on body mass index (BMI) and body fat mass measurement.Results Obesity was diagnosed in 10 of 43 children (23%). Most of them were 5􀀼9 years old (58%) With male􀀼predominance. Most patients (70%) had age of onset younger than 5 years. The median of total relapse was 7 (range 2􀀼24) and cumulative dose of prednisone was 12,240 (range 3,490 to 44,330) mg. Time since the last dose of prednisone until the study in majority was 0 to 6 months (53%). The prevalence of obesity based on BMI was 7%while based on body fat mass was 23 (el 95% 10 to 36) %. Conclusion The prevalence of obesity based on body fat mass was 23%. The median BMI of obese subjects is in the 90-95th percentile. 
Brainstem evoked response auditory in healthy term neonates with hyperbilirubinemia Jafar, Isman; Mangunatmadja, Irawan; Rohsiswatmo, Rinawati; Sudjatmiko, Sudjatmiko; Suwento, Ronny; Malik, Safarina G.
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 50 No 3 (2010): May 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi50.3.2010.144-8

Abstract

Background Bilirubin in healthy term neonates, especially free bilirubin (Bf), could enter brain cell and cause damage perceived by brainstem evoked response auditory (BERA). Studies identify that Bf is more associated to abnonnal BERA than total bilirubin is. Currently, phototherapy is perfonned in neonates with total bilirubin > 15 mg/dL. However, in developing countries where observation could not be done optimally, neonates \lith totalbilirubin> 12 mg/dL will be subject for phototherapy.Objectives To determine the association between total bilirubin > 12 mg/dL and BERA abnonnalities in healthy tenn neonates, and the value of total bilirubin and free bilirubin that initiate abnonnal BERA.Methods This cross sectional study was carried out between March 31􀁅August 8, 2008, in healthy term neonates at rooming􀁅in ward, Department of Obstetric & Gy necology, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital (CMH). All eligible subjects were examined for Bf and BERA using standard methods. Results The prevalence of abnormal BERA was 15.4%. There was no significant relation between hy perbilirubinemia (> 12 mg/ dL) and abnonnal BERA in healthy tenn neonates. Lowest total bilirubin and Bf level related to abnonnal BERA were 12.4 mg/dL (mean 12.8 mg/dL) and O.oS)Lg/dL (mean l.3)Lg/dL), respectively. All BERA abnonnalities were unilateral.Conclusions There is no association between abnormal BERA and hyperbilirubinemia (total bilirubin> 12 mg/dL) in jaundiced infants who undergo phototherapy.
Mortality predictors of pneumonia in children Kisworini, Priyanti; Setyati, Amalia; Sutaryo, Sutaryo
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 50 No 3 (2010): May 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi50.3.2010.149-53

Abstract

Background Pneumonia is one of the main causes of death in children in developing countries. It is important to identify clinical signs, demographic factors, and laboratory data which can be used to predict children who have higher risk of mortality from pneumonia.Objective To find the clinical signs, demographic factors and laboratory data that can be used as predictors of mortality from pneumonia.Methods T his historical case􀀽control study was carried out in Sardjito Hospital between January 2004 and December 2006. Data were obtained from medical records. Differential proportion between groups was analyzed with chi square. Regression analysis was used to identify clinical factors, demographic factors and laboratory factors that associated with mortality from pneumonia.Results Fifty􀀽eight patients were enrolled in this study, 29 patients were dead (case group) and 29 patients were cured (control group). Baseline data between the two groups were similar in terms of gender and mean of age. Bivariate analyses show that the predictors of mortality in children with pneumonia were: age < 1 year (OR3.11, 95% CI 1.06 to 9.08), malnutrition (OR 7.30,95% CI 1.62- to 21.03), age of the mother < 20 years (OR 2.21,95%CI 1.64 to 2.97),t achycardia (OR 6.075,95% CI 1.18 to 31.24), and anemia (OR 5 .83, 95% CI 1.88 to 18.10). Logistic regression analysis shows that tachycardia (OR 6.04, 95% CI 1.01 to 36.17) and anemia (OR 4.41,95% CI 1.25 to 15.51) were predictor of mortality in children With pneumonia.Conclusions Tachycardia and anemia play as independent mortality predictors of pneumonia in children.
Relationship between obesity and leptin serum among low socioeconomic primary school children aged 5-7 years Soenarto, Soenarto; Sendow-Tangkilisan, Helena Anneke
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 50 No 3 (2010): May 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi50.3.2010.166-9

Abstract

Background Obesity has become a major health problem globally, indicates as an epidemic problem by World Health Organization (WHO). Adiposity rebound period may represent critical period for the development of adiposity. Recent data suggest that, in industrialized countries, people of low socioeconomic group are more likely to be obese than their high socioeconomic counterparts. Level of serum leptin was reported to be higher in obese subjects. There has been lack of data regarding leptin serum level in Indonesian obese children.Objective This study aimed to investigate leptin serum level in low socioeconomic obese children. Methods This was a cross sectional study perfonned in Tuminting District, Manado. Obesity was defined based on body mass index for Asia􀁇Pacific condition, i.e., grade I obesity (BMI 25/29.9 kg/ mL), grade II (BM] 30-40 kg/ml), and grade III (BM] > 40 kg/m2 Low socioeconomic status was detennined based on Governments program Cash Direct Aid Program. loBod sample was obtained from inclusion subjects, consisted of leptin serum.Results Fifty􀁇two low socioeconomic obese children were eligible \lith age ranged between 5 to 7 years. They were divided into grade ] obesity (43 or 82.7%), and grade II (9 or 17.3%). The lowest leptin blood level was 10,291 pg/mL, while the highest was 41,500 pg/dL. All girls had nonnal serum leptin level; in contrast all boys had increased serum leptin level. Conclusions Leprin level increased in those subjects whose BMI increased.
Comparison of pulmonary function test results before and after exercise in junior high school students Zulkarnain, Hendy; Lubis, Munar; P., Gabriel; D., Ridwan M.; Lubis, Helmi M.
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 50 No 3 (2010): May 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi50.3.2010.176-80

Abstract

Background During exercise, bronchoconstriction occurs due to heat loss from mucosal respiratory ract. Exercise test can be performed to evaluate hyper-reactivity of the bronchus. The examination of pulmonary function is beneficial to confinn the diagnosis, to determine precipitating factors, and to evaluate disease severity and therapeutic response.Objective To compare pulmonary function test values before and after exercise in junior high school students aged 13 to 15 years.Methods Experimental study of 60 junior high school students from Bilah Hulu was performed using spirometry to evaluate pulmonary function before and after eight minutes of exercise. Results Functional vital capacity (FVC) values before and after eight􀁅minute exercise were 2.20 (SD 0.52) and 2.18 (SD 0.42), respectively. There was no significant difference between FVC values before and after exercise (P>0.05). The mean forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV 1) values before and aftereight minutes of exercise were 2.21 (SD 0.42) and 2.13 (SD 0.50) respectively. There was no significant difference between FEV 1 before and after the exercise (P>0.05).Conclusion Eight􀁅minute exercise does not influence the pulmonary function test results in healthy children.

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