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Paediatrica Indonesiana
ISSN : 00309311     EISSN : 2338476X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
Paediatrica Indonesiana is a medical journal devoted to the health, in a broad sense, affecting fetuses, infants, children, and adolescents, belonged to the Indonesian Pediatric Society. Its publications are directed to pediatricians and other medical practitioners or researchers at all levels of health practice throughout the world.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 11 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 50 No 6 (2010): November 2010" : 11 Documents clear
Relationship between ionized calcium and serum albumin level in children with idiopathic nephrotic syndrome Winata, Viiola Irene; Gurnida, Dida Akhmad; Sekarwana, Nanan
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 50 No 6 (2010): November 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (111.59 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi50.6.2010.361-4

Abstract

Background Nephrotic syndrome (NS) patients frequently have abnormalities in calcium metabolism that manifest as hypocalcemia and reduced intestinal absorption of calcium. Hypocalcemia is initially attributed to hypoalbuminemia but it may also relate to a low level of ionized calcium. The ionized calcium level depends on the severity and duration of proteinuria.Objective To assess the rel ationship between ionized calcium and serum albumin level in idiopathic NS children.Methods An analytical study with cross-sectional design was applied to NS and healthy children between 1-14 years old in the Child Health Department of Hasan Sadikin Hospital, Bandung from December 2009 to April 2010. Ionized calcium was examined by Ca2 + analyzer AVL 980 with ion-selective electrodes (ISE) methods.Results A total of34 subjects were recruited, consist of 17 NS and 17 healthy children. The mean ionized calcium and serum albumin level in NS children was 4.56 (SD 0.23) mg/dLand 1.45 (SD 0.24) g/dL, respectively. Statistical difference between ionized calcium level in NS and in healthy children was significant (P<0.05). Pearson correlation test between ionized calcium and serum albumin was significant (P<0.05) with correlation coefficient (r) 0.53. We found the following equation to estimate ionized calcium (y) based on the serum albumin level (x): y=3.84+0.49x.Conclusion There is a moderately positive linear relationship between ionized calcium and serum albumin level in NS children.
Influence of Hepatitis B immunization to prevent vertical transmission of Hep-B virus in infants bam from Hep-B positive mother Fitria, Liza; Gunardi, Hartono; Akib, Arwin A. P.
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 50 No 6 (2010): November 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (114.709 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi50.6.2010.321-5

Abstract

Background Hepatitis B is one of the most common infectious diseases worldv.ide. Indonesia has moderate-high endemicity for hepatitis B infection. Perinatal transmission increases the risk for chronic hepatitis B. Infants from HBsAg-positive mothers should receive hepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIG) and vaccination within 12 hours of birth, but this practice is not routinely done in Indonesia due to financial constraints.Objectives To detennine the influence of Hep-B immunization on preventing Hepatitis B vertical transmission. Methods A descriptive cohort study was conducted from May 2009 - January 2010. Subjects were term infants born from HBsAg-positive mothers v.ith no history of HBIG administration. They had received complete hepatitis B immunization and 1 month after the last dose were evaluated for HBsAg and anti-HBs. Cord blood was also taken during labor to measure HBsAg.Results There were 22 infants born from HBsAg-positive mother who met the inclusion criteria. HBsAgwas positive in 6 of22 cord blood specimens. There were 15 infants who completed this study. One of 15 infants had positive HBsAg after completed hepatitis B immunization and 12 of 15 infants had protective level of anti-HBs. Effectiveness of hepatitis B immunization to prevent vertical transmission in this study was 70-90%.Conclusion Hepatitis B immunization can prevent vertical transmission of hepatitis B in infants born to mothers who are HBsAg-positive even without administration of HBIG.
Use of pediatric logistic organ dysfunction in determining prognostic among pediatric intensive care unIt patIents Honna, Lulu; Triratna, Silvia; Triwani, Triwani; Theodorus, Theodorus
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 50 No 6 (2010): November 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (126.074 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi50.6.2010.347-50

Abstract

Background Pediatric intensive care unit is the place for caring the children \\lith higher risk of mortality, usually with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) that can increase difficulty in detennining prognostic. Th erefore, an objective severity of illness and organ dysfunction score is needed. Pediatric logistic organ dysfunction (PELOD) score can be considered as a representative for probability of death and predicting the prognostic.Objective To determine the prognostic of patients in PICU Mohammad Hoesin hospital (RSMH), Palembang, using PELOD score.Methods An observational study was conducted from April-September 2009 among PICU patients. PELOD score was assessed in the first 24 hour. S tatistical analysis was performed using Z-Mann Whitney test, Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit, ROC curve and survival analysis Kaplan Meier (KM).Results There were 45 (55%) boys and 36 (44%) girls with mean age 51 (SD 6 ,4 7) months. Children with MODS were 75%. Death was 37 (45%) and survival was 44 (54%) with mean length of stay was 181,92 (SE 30,23) hours. PELOD score was from 0 to 51. The best PELOD score related to death in coordinate point was 20,5 with ROC 0,862. Length of stay in grup \\lith PELOD score < 20.5 was 371.22 (SE 82.13) hours and > 20.5 was 93 (SE 17.48) hours (log rank P=0.000). S urvival function KM showed that the higher PELOD score, the shorter length of stay in PICU.Henceforth, the higher probability prediction of mortality.Conclusion PELOD score can be used as a prognostic predictor of mortality among PICU patients in Mohammad Hoesin Hospital (RSMH), Palemhang.
The proportion of bone mineral density in children with high risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia after 6- and 12-month chemotherapy maintenance phase Santoso, Mira Christiyani; Windiastuti, Endang; Tumbelaka, Alan R.
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 50 No 6 (2010): November 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (121.074 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi50.6.2010.365-70

Abstract

Background Low bone mineral density (BMD) value is one of the current concerns in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients. Some risk factors including use of chemotherapeutic drugs, nutritional status, phy sical activities, and progression of disease are suspected as the predisposing factors for development of osteopenia and osteoporosis.Objectives To obtain the proportion of BMD z-score, level of calcium ions, and 25 (OH)D3 in children 'With high risk ALL after 6 and 12 months chemotherapy maintenance phase.Methods We conducted a cross-sectional comparative study from May 2008 to May 2010. Subjects were high risk ALL patients aged 5-18 years old who had completed the 6 or 12 months chemotherapy maintenance phase. We measured 25 (OH) D3 level, calcium ion level, and BMD using electro chemi-luminescence immunoassay, ion selective electrode, and dual x-ray absorptiometry, respectively.Results There were 40 subjects who enrolled this study. The incidence of hypocalcemia and vitamin D deficiency were 33/40 and 40/40, respectively. The mean calcium ion levels, 25 (OH)D3 level, and BMD z????score values in six months groups were 1.1 (0.1 SD) mmol/L, 21.3 (2 SD) ng/L, -0.7 (0.8 SD), respectively, while in the 12 months group, the values were 1.1 (0.0 SD) mmol/L, 21(2.2 SD) ng/L, -1.7 (0.6 SD), respectively (P=0.478). Body mass index (BMI) and corticosteroid cumulative dose is correlated \\lith the low BMD values in L1-L4.Conclusion The bone mineral metabolism disorder marked with the low levels of calcium, 25 (OH)D3 and osteopenia was observed in ALL patients who underwent chemotherapy. The proportion of the BMD z-score value, calcium ion level, and 25 (OH) D3 in the two groups were not statistically significant.
Correlation between serum zinc level and simple febrile seizure in children Margaretha, Lusiana; Masloman, Nurhayati
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 50 No 6 (2010): November 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (127.763 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi50.6.2010.326-30

Abstract

Background Simple febrile seizure is the most common form of seizure which occurs during childhood period. Zinc, one of microelements in human body, has an important role in central nervous system formation.Objectives To find out serum zinc level in simple febrile seizure patients and the correlation between serum zinc level and simplefebrile seizure.Methods This cros-sectional study was conducted at R. D. Kandoll Hospital, Tingkat III Teling Hospital and Pancaran Kasih Hospital, Manado on April 5th - June 15th, 2009.Results Diagnosis for febrile v.ithout seizure patients were 12 with acute respiratory tract infection (ARl), 6 dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), 6 acute diarrhea v.ithout dehydration and 1 ARI with DHF, while simple febrile seizure were 19 ARI, five acute diarrhea v.ithout dehydration and one ARI v.ith DHF. There were no significant differences of age, gender and nutritional status in two groups. F amily history of febrile seizure, febrile period and body temperature in two groups were significantly different. Mean serum zinc level in simple febrile seizure and febrile v.ithout seizure were 8.83 μmol/L and 13.72 μmol/L, respectively. Mean serum zinc level in simple febrile seizure children with seizure period <5 minutes, 5-<10 minutes and 10-15 minutes were 10.27 (SD 0.25)  μmol/L, 9.02 (SD 0.81) ) μmol/L and 6.90 (SD) 0.98 μmol/L, respectively.Conclusions There is correlation between serum zinc level and simple febrile seizure. The lesser serum zinc level, the longer duration of seizure occurs in simple febrile seizure.
Relationship between obesity and left ventricular hypertrophy in children Rompis, Johnny; Kaunang, Erling David
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 50 No 6 (2010): November 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (105.435 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi50.6.2010.331-5

Abstract

Background Obesity is a chronic metabolic disorder associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) increasing morbidity-mortality rates. It is apparent that a variety of adaptations/alterations in cardiac structure and function occurs as excessive adipose tissue accumulates. This leads to a decrease in diastolic compliance, eventually resulting in an increase in left ventricular filling pressure and left ventricular enlargement.Objective To evaluate left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) among  obese using electrocardiographic (ECG) criteria.Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted on 74 children aged 10-15 years from February 2009 to October 2009. The subjects were divided into obese and control groups. Physical examination and standard 12 lead electrocardiography (ECG) were done in both groups.Results Of 37 obese children, LVH were featured in 3 subjects, while in control group, only 1 child had LVH (P= 0.304). We found that mean RV6 in obese and control group were 9.8446 (SD 3.5854) and 11.9662 (SD 3.2857), respectively (P=0.005). As an additional findings, we found that birth weight was related to obesity in children.Conclusion There is no relation between obesity and left ventricular using ECG criteria in obese children aged 10-15 years.
Knowledge of pediatrician on gastroesophageal reflux/gastroesophageal reflux disease in children: a preliminary study Surjono, Edward; Firmansyah, Agus; Batubara, Jose R. L.
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 50 No 6 (2010): November 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (103.711 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi50.6.2010.336-9

Abstract

Background Gastroesophageal reflux (OER) is involuntary movement of gastric content into esophagus due to transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation. This condition usually ignored by physician. Many GER cases have severe complication before properly managed. Ten years after incorporating GER into Indonesia pediatric training curriculum, the knowledge of GER among pediatrician need to be measured.Objectives To measure pediatrician's knowledge of GER/GERD in children.Methods This was a cross sectional study using questionnaire and interview.Result There were 387 respondents who filled the questionnaire and being interviewed. The majority of respondents were between 25-45 years old (33.6%). Respondents who graduated before the year 2000 were 48.3%, and after 2000 were 51.7%. Majority of respondents were general pediatrician (90.2%) and 41.3% working in teaching hospitals Among pediatricians graduated after year 2000,6 6%,5 0.5% and 57.5% could gave more than 80% correct answer to questions about general knowledge, diagnosis and management of GERD as compared to 49.2%, 42.2% and 47% subjects graduated before year 2000. More pediatricians graduated before year 2000 answered the questions on general knowledge, diagnosis and management < 60% correctly compared to those graduated after year 2000 (42.2%, 25.2% and 28.3% vs. 14%,11.5% and 12%, respectively). Fifty five of 160 (34.4%) respondents who working in teaching hospital gave more than 80% correct answer to questions about GERD. Compared to those working in non-teaching hospitals, only 17.6% were able to correctly answer more than 80% of questions.Conclusions Better knowledge about GER/GERD are found among pediatricians graduated after the topics has been introduced to the curriculum and among those practicing in teaching hospitals.
Normal motor milestone development for use to promote child care Husaini, Mahdin A.; Bahari, Abas B.; Husaini, Jajah K.; Widodo, Yekti; Harahap, Heryudarini; Suwarti, Susi; Purnomosari, Dewi; Hadis, Fawziah A.
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 50 No 6 (2010): November 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (431.052 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi50.6.2010.340-6

Abstract

Background Motor behavior is an essential aspect of child development, and usually assessed in terms of age of achievement of motor milestone. The early detection of infants experiencing subtle delays in motor maturation can allow early intervention in developmental problems. Intervention can be more effective if delays are identified early. In order to facilitate the identification of early delays, the Center of Nutrition and Foods Research andDevelopment in Bogor has designed a simple tool to monitor the child (aged 3 to 18 months) motor development.Objective To develop an observable of normal gross motor maturation for use to detect deviance or motor delay.Methods A total of 2100 healthy children, aged 3-18 months, from high socio-economic group, in urban and suburban areas, were studied. Body length, weight and motor development were measured on all children. Gross motor development was measured 17 pre selected milestones: lie, sit, crawl, creep, stand Mth assistance, walk with assistance, stand alone, walk alone, and run.Results There were no differences between males and females in the comparison of attainment motor maturation therefore a sex combined curve was developed.Conclusion The curve of normal motor milestone development can be used as a tool to evaluate motor development over time, and/or as a child development card for use in primary health care.
Incidence of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia in low, intermediate-low, and intermediate-high risk group infants Widiasta, Ahmed; Reniarti, Lelani; Sukadi, Abdurachman
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 50 No 6 (2010): November 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (117.836 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi50.6.2010.351-4

Abstract

Background Neonatal hyperbilirubinemia is commonly found in newborns. Assessment of the risk of hyperbilirubinemia and information on the average time of the occurrence of hyperbilirubinemia are important to prevent the development of severe hyperbilirubinemia.Objective To find out the incidence of and the time of the development of hyperbilirubinemia in healthy-term newborns.Method A cohort prospective study was done on healthy-term newborns born at Hasan Sadikin Hospital between November and December 2009. Subjects were divided into 4 groups of risk at discharged, based on Bhutani nonnogram. A serial bilirubin level measurement were perfonned within 6 days.Resu l ts One of 14 newborns at low risk group developed hyperbilirubinemia but did not need phototherapy. Six of 14 newborns at intermediate-low risk group developed hyperbilirubinemia, 2 of them needed phototherapy with total serum bilirubin level of 14.7 mg/dL at 57 hours and 19.8 mg/dL at111 hours. Nine of 15 newborns of intennediate-high risk group developed hyperbilirubinemia, 1 of them needed phototherapy with total serum bilirubin level of 16.6 mg/dL at 76 hours. There was no newborn cathegorized as high risk group in this study. The median time the occurrence of hyperbilirubinemia in intennediate-low and intennediate-high risk group was 140 hours and 82 hours, respectively. There was no significant difference in survival curve between intennediate-high and intennediate-low risk groups (95% CI 108.1 to 1 2 5.4).Conclusion The incidence of hyperbilirubinemia was not different between intennediate-low and intermediate-high risk babies.
Clinical predictors of hypoxemia in 1-5 year old children with pneumonia Supartha, Made; Purniti, Putu Siadi; Naning, Roni; Subanada, Ida Bagus
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 50 No 6 (2010): November 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (119.921 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi50.6.2010.355-60

Abstract

Background Pneumonia remains a major killer of under five children. Hypoxemia is the most serious manifestation of pneumonia. The most reliable way to detect hypoxemia is an arterial blood analysis or SPar However, these tools are not widely available; therefore, a simple clinical manifestation should be used as an alternative.Objective To determine clinical predictors of hypoxemia in 1-5 year-old children with pneumonia in Indonesia.Methods This study was conducted between February 2007 to  August 2008 at Sanglah Hospital, Denpasar, Bali. Sample was selected using a convenient sampling method. Subjects were divided into group of hypoxemia and nonnal saturation. We did clinical examination and SpOz measurement, as the gold standard, simultaneously.Results From 120 subjects" the prevalence of hypoxemia was 17.5%. The best single clinical predictors of hypoxemia was cyanosis (sensitivity 43%, specificity 99%, positive predictive value (PPV) 90%, negative predictive value (NPV) 89%). The best combination of clinical predictors of hypoxemia was cyanosis and head nodding (sensitivity 43%, specificity 99%, PPV 90%, NPV 89%.Conclusion Cyanosis or combination of cyanosis and head nodding is useful clinical predictors of hypoxemia in childhood pneumonia.

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