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Paediatrica Indonesiana
ISSN : 00309311     EISSN : 2338476X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
Paediatrica Indonesiana is a medical journal devoted to the health, in a broad sense, affecting fetuses, infants, children, and adolescents, belonged to the Indonesian Pediatric Society. Its publications are directed to pediatricians and other medical practitioners or researchers at all levels of health practice throughout the world.
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Articles 11 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 51 No 4 (2011): July 2011" : 11 Documents clear
Decreased peak expiratory flow in pediatric passive smokers Yanti, Fitri; Ali, Muhammad; Daulay, Ridwan M.; Dalimunthe, Wisman; Daulay, Rini Savitri
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 51 No 4 (2011): July 2011
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi51.4.2011.198-201

Abstract

Background Indonesia ranks fifth among countries with the highest aggregate levels of tobacco consumption in the world. Infants and children exposed to environmental tobacco smoke have increased rates of asthma, respiratory and ear infections, as well as reduced lung function. The effects of tobacco smoke exposure on lung function in children have been reported to be dependent on the source of smoke and the length and dose of exposure. Lung function may also be affected by a child’s gender and asthma status.Objective To compare peak expiratory flow (PEF) in pediatric passive smokers to that of children not exposed to second hand smoke, and to define factors that may affect PEF in passive smokers.Methods In August 2009 we conducted a cross-sectional study at an elementary school in the Langkat district. Subjects were aged 6 to 12 years, and divided into two groups: passive smokers and those not exposed to secondhand smoke. Subjects’ PEFs were measured with a Mini-Wright peak flow meter. Measurements were performed in triplicate with the highest value recorded as the PEF. Demographic data including age, sex, weight, height, family income, parental education levels and occupations were obtained through questionnaires.Results Of the 170 participants, 100 were passive smokers and 70 were not exposed to secondhand smoke. Age distribution, weight and height were similar in both groups. We observed a significant difference in PEFs between the group of passive smokers and the group not exposed to secondhand smoke, 211.3 L/minute (SD 61.08) and 242.7 L/minute (SD 77.09), respectively (P < 0.005). The number of years of exposure to smoke (P = 0.079) and the number of cigarettes smoked daily in the household (P = 0.098) did not significantly influence PEF.Conclusion The PEF in pediatric passive smokers was significantly lower than that of children not exposed to secondhand smoke. PEF in passive smokers was not influenced by the number of years of smoke exposure or the number of cigarettes smoked daily in the household.
Correlation between obesity with atopy and family history of atopy in children Apandi, Putria Rayani; Setiabudiawan, Budi; Sukadi, Abdurachman
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 51 No 4 (2011): July 2011
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi51.4.2011.227-33

Abstract

Background The prevalence of childhood obesity and atopy has increased in recent decades. Research on links between obesity and atopy has shown varied results. Few previous studies have reported on the significance of family history of atopic disease in children.Objective To determine correlation between obesity with atopy and family history of atopic disease in children.Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted from April to September 2010 in the Pediatric Allergy-Immunology subdivision, Hasan Sadikin Hospital. Children aged 6−11 years were divided into four groups of 40 each: obese subjects with and without family history of atopic disease, and normal weight subjects with and without family history of atopic disease. Skin prick test was performed to determine which subjects had atopy. Chi-square test was used to analyze mutual independence, and partial Chi-square test was used to analyze correlation of obesity to atopy and family history of atopic disease in children. Environmental factors, type of childbirth, and pregnancy history were also analyzed as risk factors for atopy.Results Of 80 obese children with and without family history of atopic disease, 40 (100%) and 38 (95%), respectively, were atopic. Of 80 normal weight children with and without family history of atopic disease, 39 (98%) and 9 (23%), respectively, were atopic. Thus atopy was observed in 126 subjects, while the remaining 34 subjects were non-atopic. Partial test showed a correlation between obesity with atopy and family history of atopic disease (P < 0.001). There were no significant differences in risk factors for atopy by group.Conclusion Obesity correlates with atopy and family history of atopic disease in children.
Effect of massage stimulation on weight gain in full term infants Dewi, Nyoman Nursari; Soetjiningsih, Soetjiningsih; Prawirohartono, Endy Paryanto
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 51 No 4 (2011): July 2011
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi51.4.2011.202-6

Abstract

Background Massage is a tactile/kinesthetic stimulation with biochemical and physiological effects on the body. Newborn infant massage stimulation given by mothers may promote maternal-infant bonding and attachment, enhance infant weight gain and stimulate the production of breast milk. There have been few studies on the effect of massage stimulation on weight gain in full term infants, and this topic remains controversial.Objective To examine the effect of massage stimulation on weight gain in full term infants.Methods This quasi-experimental study was held in Sanglah Hospital and Bunda Setia Maternity Clinic. Massage stimulation was performed by mothers once daily for a four week period. Massage stimulation was given to 30 full term infants and their weight gain was compared to 31 control infants who did not receive massages.Results There were no differences in subject characteristics between the massage and control groups. Median weight gain in the massage group was 1230 grams, while that in the control group was 830 grams (P=0.028).Conclusion Weight gain in full term infants in the massage group was significantly greater than that in the control group after 4 weeks.
Comparison of quinine-doxycycline and quinine-clindamycin for falciparum malaria in children Daulay, Ditho Athos P.; Trisnawati, Yunnie; Lubis, Syamsidah; Lubis, Munar; Pasaribu, Syahril
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 51 No 4 (2011): July 2011
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi51.4.2011.187-91

Abstract

Objective To compare the efficacy of quinine-doxycycline to quinine-clindamycin combination, as treatment for uncomplicated falciparum malaria in children.Methods This randomized open labelled controlled trial was conducted from July to August 2007 at Mandailing Natal, Sumatera Utara Province. The subjects were 8 – 18 year old children with positive Plasmodium falciparum from the peripheral blood smear. Simple randomization was performed to determine subject study into two groups of treatment, one group received quinine-clindamycin and the other received quinine-doxycycline treatment. The parasitemia was counted on day 0, 2, 7 and 28. We also observed the adverse effects of the antimalarial combination.Results Two hundred and forty six children who fulfilled the inclusion criteria were divided into two groups. All subjects completed the study. Cure rate achieved 100% from peripheral blood smear examination at the second day observation and showed no recrudescence at day 28th. (P=0.0001). During 28 days follow up, there were 21 (17.6%) patients suffered from headache, 18 (14.6%) vomit and 40 children (32.5%) suffered from tinnitus in quinine-doxycycline combination, compared to quinine-clindamycin combination group only 4 (3.3%) suffered from headache, 1 (0.8%) suffered from tinnitus and there was no vomiting experience in any patient (P < 0.0001).Conclusion Combination of quinine with either clindamycin or doxycycline are effective as an alternative antimalarial treatment. The combination of quinine-clindamycin is well tolerated than the combination of quinine-doxyciline, and this combination may be particular value for young children and pregnant women, as these two groups cannot receive doxycycline.
Admission characteristics of pediatric chronic kidney disease Hidayati, Eka Laksmi; Trihono, Partini Pudjiati
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 51 No 4 (2011): July 2011
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi51.4.2011.192-7

Abstract

Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in children is a potentially fatal disease if left untreated. Early detection and treatment are important to slow progression to end-stage renal disease requiring dialysis.Objective We aimed to find characteristics of CKD patients at admission and evaluate factors associated with end-stage CKD (stage 5).Methods Our cross-sectional study was based on medical records of CKD patients aged less than 18 years in Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta, from January 2007 to December 2009. Diagnosis and stages of CKD were based on the Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (K/DOQI) criteria. Data on disease etiology, symptoms, nutritional status and laboratory tests were collected. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed to examine the association between end-stage CKD and its possible risk factors.Results Of the 142 cases eligible for analysis, 55% were boys. Subjects’ median age was 73.5 months (interquartile range of 23.5-122.5 months). Edema and recurrent fever were the two most frequent symptoms of CKD if diagnosed at stages 2-4, while breathlessness was the most frequent symptom of CKD if diagnosed at stage 5. The most common etiologies were glomerulonephritis (49.3%) and anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (32.4%). Of our CKD subjects, 21.8% were in stage 5. Independent predictors of stage 5 CKD at presentation were hypertension (OR 3.88; 95% CI 1.17 to 12.87; P=0.026), urea level > 60 mg/dL (OR 39.11; 95%CI 4.86 to 314.74; P<0.001) and non-glomerulonephritis as the etiology (OR 6.51; 95%CI 2.12 to 19.92; P<0.001).Conclusion Glomerular disease was the most common cause of CKD in our study. Stage 5 CKD was present in 21.8% of subjects at admission and could be predicted by the presence of hypertension, high serum urea level, and non-glomerular disease as the etiology.
Sensitization to indoor allergens and frequency of asthma exacerbations in children Irene, Irene; Purniti, Putu Siadi; Sumadiono, Sumadiono
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 51 No 4 (2011): July 2011
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi51.4.2011.207-12

Abstract

Background The rapid increase in asthma incidence has implicated the importance of environmental influences over genetic influences. Sensitization to perennial indoor allergens has been associated with increased asthma symptoms.Objective To examine the correlation between sensitization to indoor allergens and frequency of asthma exacerbations in children.Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out on asthmatic children aged 6 to 12 years in the Department of Child Health, Udayana University Medical School /Sanglah Hospital, Denpasar. Degree of sensitization was assessed by mean wheal diameter (positive defined as 3 mm greater than negative control) for seven common indoor allergens. Frequency of asthma exacerbation for three consecutive months prior to data collection was retrospectively reviewed.Results Positive skin test results for one or more allergens were found in 84 of 89 (94%) asthmatic children. Higher frequency of asthma exacerbations weakly correlated with the number of allergens with positive sensitization (r=0.284; P=0.007). Mean wheal diameter of each allergen did not correlate to the frequency of asthma exacerbations. In addition, the frequency of asthma exacerbations was independent for parental and sibling atopic history, preceding respiratory infections, use of asthma controllers and passive environmental tobacco smoke exposure.Conclusions Sensitization to common indoor allergens correlates weakly with frequency of asthma exacerbations. 
School performance in pubertal adolescents with dysmenorrhea Alam, Syamsir; Hakimi, Hakimi; Sembiring, Tiangsa; Deliana, Melda; Lubis, Siska Mayasari
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 51 No 4 (2011): July 2011
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi51.4.2011.213-6

Abstract

Background Dysmenorrhea is a common gynecological symptom reported in adolescent girls. Prevalence of the condition has been reported to be 45 - 75%. Absenteeism from work and school as a result of dysmenorrhea is common (13 - 51% of women have been absent at least once, and 5 - 14% are often absent due to the severity of symptoms).Objective To compare school performance in pubertal adolescent girls with and without dysmenorrhea.Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in June 2010 in adolescent females aged 12 - 18 years from the Musthafawiyah School, Mandailing Natal district, North Sumatera. Adolescent females with and without dysmenorrhea were recruited for this study. All participants completed questionnaires including age of menarche, length of menstrual cycle, length of bleeding, number of sanitary napkins used daily and school absences. School reports from two consecutive semesters in one year were used to evaluate subjects’ academic performance. An academic score of higher than 7.5 was considered good performance while scores of less than 7.5 were considered poor. We used the chi-square test to analyze differences in school performance between girls with and without dysmenorrhea.Results One hundred and sixteen participants were divided into 2 groups, those with and without dysmenorrhea, of 58 subjects each. We found no significant difference in school performance between the two groups, P=0.176 (95% CI -0.009 to -0.048 and P=0.08 (95%CI -0.052 to 0.024).Conclusion There was no significant difference in school performance of girls with and without dysmenorrhea.
Using iron profiles to identify anemia of chronic disease in anemic children with tuberculosis Wigati, Reni; Windiastuti, Endang; Hegar, Badriul
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 51 No 4 (2011): July 2011
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi51.4.2011.217-22

Abstract

Background Anemia of chronic disease (ACD) is commonly found in patients with chronic inflammation or infection. By examining soluble transferrin receptor or bone marrow iron, ACD was found in 80% of anemic adult tuberculosis (TB) patients. Iron profile, another tool to differentiate ACD from iron deficiency anemia (IDA), is both less expensive and less invasive. Few studies have been reported on iron profiles of anemic children with TB in Indonesia.Objective We aimed to use iron profiles to determine the proportion of ACD in anemic children with tuberculosis.Methods A cross-sectional study on anemic children with TB who came to Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital and Tebet Puskesmas (community health center) was performed in September-November 2010. Iron profiles included the measurements of serum iron (SI), total iron binding capacity (TIBC), transferrin saturation (TF), and serum ferritin (SF).Results Our study comprised of 66 subjects, with a median age of 3.8 years (6 months–18 years). Most subjects had normal SI (85%), normal TIBC (71%), low transferrin saturation (51%), and normal SF (71%). Only 10 children had iron homeostasis disorder and 6 of these were diagnosed as having ACD. Thus, iron profiles failed to prove that iron metabolism was disturbed. The profile of children with organ-specific TB was more consistent with ACD compared to the profile of childhood TB. [SI 29.1 (11-83) vs 44 (10-151) μg/dL; TIBC 239.3 (100.80) vs 299.0 (58.51) μg/dL; TF 18.3 (4-100) vs 15 (1-53) %; and SF 154 (34.9-655) vs 36.1 (2.5-213.4) μg/L].Conclusion The proportion of ACD (9%) diagnosed by using iron profiles was not as high as previously reported. Further research using newer techniques is needed to detect ACD in anemic children with TB. [
Food and migraine in adolescents Bouhairet, Magda; Ali, Muhammad; Saing, Bistok; Saing, Johannes Harlan; Dimyati, Yazid
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 51 No 4 (2011): July 2011
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi51.4.2011.223-6

Abstract

Background Migraine headaches are a common problem worldwide, especially in adolescents. They are usually chronic, with frequent relapses. Therefore, any dietary risk factor for headaches has important implications on migraineurs. However, the association between migraine and diet needs to be examined further.Objective To investigate the association between diet and migraine in adolescents.Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study in August to September 2009 on 13 - 18 year old adolescents in a senior high school in Medan, North Sumatera. We included subjects diagnosed with migraine, according to the International Headache Society (IHS) criteria. Ninety participants completed the questionnaire. Foods we observed for a link to migraine included milk, chocolate, ice cream, cheese, bread, instant noodles, meatballs, chili sauce, sweetener, yoghurt, pizza, and other foods and beverages.Results Of the 90 participants with migraines, there were more females (61.1%) than males. There were statistically significant associations between migraine and triggering foods (P = 0.045, 95% CI 0.59 to 0.79) as well as between migraine and family history of migraine (P = 0.043, 95% CI 0.46 to 0.66). Stress (P = 0.164), menstruation (P = 0.369), and sound or light (P= 0.577) had no significant association with migraine. A wide variety of foods and beverages were implicated as migraine precipitants. The most common were chili sauce (75.8%), ice cream (71.0%), milk (67.7%), instant noodles (67.7%), chocolate (61.3%), peanuts (59.7%), cheese (54.8%) and meatballs (54.8%).Conclusion Food and family history have a significant association with the occurrence of migraine in adolescents. 
Lansoprazole for recurrent abdominal pain in adolescents Surya, Ade Saifan; Nafianti, Selvi; Deliana, Melda; Supriatmo, Supriatmo; Sinuhaji, Atan Baas
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 51 No 4 (2011): July 2011
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi51.4.2011.234-40

Abstract

Background Recurrent abdominal pain is common among adolescents. School absenteeism and lower quality of life are associated with severity of symptoms. Lansoprazole has been used to treat recurrent abdominal pain.Objective To investigate the effectiveness of lansoprazole as a treatment for recurrent abdominal pain in adolescents.Methods We conducted a randomized, double-blind, controlled trial from August 2009 to October 2009. Adolescents suffering recurrent abdominal pain were eligible for the study. Simple randomization was done to divide subjects into two groups. Groups received 30 mg of lansoprazole or placebo, once a day for 14 days. Before treatment, we performed laboratory and physical examinations. Pain frequency was measured in number of abdominal pain episodes per month. Duration was measured in minutes and pain intensity was measured by a pain rating scale. Drug efficacy was measured before, during and after intervention. Data was analyzed using Mann-Whitney U-test and t-test.Results One hundred sixteen recurrent abdominal pain patients were randomized into two groups of 58 patients. There were no statistically significant differences in pain frequency before and after treatment for either the lansoprazole group or the placebo group (P=0.083, 95%CI, -0.033 to 0.021 and P=0.096, 95%CI -0.376 to 0.031, respectively). In addition, there were no significant differences in frequency, duration, and degree of abdominal pain at baseline and after 1, 2 and 3 months of treatment between the two groups.Conclusion Lansoprazole was not more effective than the placebo for treatment of recurrent abdominal pain among adolescents.

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