cover
Contact Name
-
Contact Email
-
Phone
-
Journal Mail Official
-
Editorial Address
-
Location
Kota semarang,
Jawa tengah
INDONESIA
Paediatrica Indonesiana
ISSN : 00309311     EISSN : 2338476X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
Paediatrica Indonesiana is a medical journal devoted to the health, in a broad sense, affecting fetuses, infants, children, and adolescents, belonged to the Indonesian Pediatric Society. Its publications are directed to pediatricians and other medical practitioners or researchers at all levels of health practice throughout the world.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 11 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 52 No 1 (2012): January 2012" : 11 Documents clear
Surveillance of rotavirus diarrhea Widowati, Titis; Soenarto, Yati; Bakrie, Achirul; Nirwati, Hera
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 52 No 1 (2012): January 2012
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (111.08 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi52.1.2012.22-27

Abstract

Background Rotavirus is a major cause of severe diarrhea anddehydration in children worldwide. Data on the burden of diseasein Indonesia is limited.Objective To provide an epidemiological profile of rotavirusinfection among children hospitalized for diarrhea in MohammadHoesin Hospital, Palembang.Methods In January- December 2006, a prospective, hospitalbasedsurveillance was carried out in children aged less thanfive years, presenting with diarrhea. Stool samples wereexamined for rotavirus using enzyme immunoassay (EIA).G- and P-typing were performed on specimens confirmed tobe positive by EIA.Results A total of 513 fecal specimens from 534 children weretested for rotavirus. Rotavirus was detected in 64% of thespecimens, mostly of the G9 type (62.5%). Incidence ofrotavirusdiarrhea was highest in the 6 month to 2 years age group (60.4%).Children with rotavirus diarrhea were more likely to present withdehydration, compared to those with non-rotavirus diarrhea (94%vs 70%, respectively, P=0.03).Conclusion Rotavirus was the most common pathogen foundin children with diarrhea. Rotavirus was detected in 64% ofpediatric diarrheal specimens tested in our study. This findingwarrants the use of a large-scale program to prevent disease,such as vaccination against rotavirus. [Paediatr lndones.2012;52:22-7].
Breastfeeding and decreased risk for childhood obesity Sulanto, Aspri; Wandita, Setya; Julia, Madarina
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 52 No 1 (2012): January 2012
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (105.562 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi52.1.2012.1-5

Abstract

Background Breast milk promotes infant growth and appropriateweight gain, minimizing the risk for malnutrition, and possiblyfor obesity.Objective To determine the influence of infant breastfeedingpractices on the risk for obesity in children aged 6 to 8 years.Methods We conducted a case-control study comparingbreastfeeding practices between obese and non-obese children.Subjects were selected from two elementary schools in Yogyakarta.Case subjects had body mass index (BMI)-for-age <::: + 2 SD(WHO 2007 growth reference curve). Control subjects had BMIfor-age SD between-2and+1 SD, and were matched for age andgender to the case subjects. Subjects' mothers filled questionnaireson their breastfeeding practices.Results We recruited 68 pairs of obese and non-obese subjects,4 7 (69%) pairs of boys and 21 (31 %) pairs of girls. The meanduration of breastfeeding in the obese group was shorter thanthat of the non-obese group, 12.9 months (SD 9.78) vs. 16.1months (8.39), respectively, a mean difference of 3.24 months(95% CI 0.14 to 6.32). Partially breastfed and formula-fed childrenhad significantly higher odds for obesity compared to that ofexclusively breastfed children, OR4.70 (95% CI 3.96 to 5.43) forpartial breastfeeding and 6.20 (95% CI 4.67 to 7.73) for formulafeeding. The risk for obesity also declined with longer durationsof breastfeeding.Conclusion Exclusive infant breastfeeding and longer durationof breastfeeding lowered the risk for childhood obesity in childrenaged 6-8 years. [Paediatr lndones. 2012;52: 1-5]. 
Role of Denver II and Development Quotients in the management of several pediatric developmental and behavioral disorders Sularyo, Titi; Endyarni, Bernie; H, Tri Lestari; Tamin, Tirza Z.; Gitayanti, Gitayanti
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 52 No 1 (2012): January 2012
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (116.195 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi52.1.2012.51-56

Abstract

Background Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and attention deficitand hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are nowadays becoming moreand more frequently found. Parents are worried of the possibilitythat their children suffer from them. Growth and developmentclinics (GDC) should be able to deliver professional services. Thusa practica~ applicable, objective, valid, reliable, and able to measuredevelopment quotient (DQ) values instrument is needed.Objective To find out whether the Denver II instrument andDQ values can be used in the management of children with ASDandADHD.Methods A study was carried out on cases of children withASD, multisystem development disorder (MSDD), pervasivedevelopment disorder - n ot otherwise specified (PDD-NOS), andattention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), consistingof history taking, physical examination, establishing diagnosis,therapy, evaluation, and follow-up. The Denver II instrumentwas used and DQ values in all development streams established.The study was done at the GDC of Hermina Depok Hospital inJuly 2008 - June 2009.Results It revealed that results of the Denver II as seen on thefilled Denver II form showed "typical" features related to kind ofdisorder as far as category ofDQ value, dissociation, global delayeddevelopment (GDD) as well as abnormality of the test behaviorwere concerned. It also revealed that establishing the diagnosesby the use of the Denver II and DQ values gave exactly the samediagnoses as when using the conventional way by the expert.Conclusion The Denver II instrument with DQ values can beused in the management of ASD and ADHD cases. [Paediatrlndones. 2012;52:51-6].
Pertussis-like syndrome or pertussis: a delay diagnosis Nataprawira, Heda Melinda; Cahayasari, Finia; Kashmir, Arifin
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 52 No 1 (2012): January 2012
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (103.187 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi52.1.2012.28-31

Abstract

Background Recent reports of pertussis epidemiology from Asia,Africa and South America have been limited, but the WorldHealth Organization estimates indicate that these regions havethe highest disease burden. Difficulty in estimating the prevalenceof pertussis is due to lack of access to diagnostic methods,misdiagnoses, under-reporting, and different countries' reportingcriteria. A syndrome characterized by severe episodes of coughingresembling whooping cough (pertussis) has also been defined aspertussis-like syndrome.Objective To report eleven cases of pertussis or pertussis-likesyndrome in the pediatric ward of Hasan Sadikin Hospital.Methods This retrospective study was conducted by reviewingmedical records from 2008-2010. Characteristics of 11 pertussislikesyndrome patients were documented including age, gender,history of pertussis immunization, clinical manifestations,laboratory findings, initial diagnosis, treatment and clinicalresponse. Isolation of Bordetella pertussis using Bordet-Gengouagar was also noted. Pertussis diagnoses were grouped based ontwo classifications: probable and confirmed.Results Eleven patients were diagnosed with pertussis-likesyndrome, including 5 boys and 6 girls. Most subjects were lessthan 6 months of age. Only one subject had received previouspertussis immunization. Dyspnea, paroxysmal cough, and feverwere the most common symptoms. All were initially diagnosedto have had severe bacterial pneumonia, and later changed toprobable pertussis. Three subjects exhibited post-tussive vomitingand cyanosis, while none had apneic symptoms. All B. pertussisisolations yielded negative results. Ampicillin or cephalosporinwas initially administered. Patients receiving subsequentclarithromycin showed good clinical responses.Conclusion All infants were likely considered to have pertussis,as most had no pertussis immunizations. However, B. pertussisisolation was unsuccessful in all cases. As such, diagnoses couldnot be confirmed. [Paediatr In don es. 2012;5 2: 28-31].
Accuracy of the Indonesian child development pre-screening questionnaire Simangunsong, Syahperlan Wendi; Machfudz, Soeroyo; Sitaresmi, Mei Neni
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 52 No 1 (2012): January 2012
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (100.79 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi52.1.2012.6-9

Abstract

Background Early stimulation, detection and intervention areimportant for child development and are recommended in theearly years of childhood for optimal results. The Indonesianchild development pre-screening questionnaire, Kuesioner PraSkrining Perkembangan (KPSP), has been widely used in publichealth centers (PHC) and community health centers (CHC)in the country. Howevei; the accuracy of this test has not beenadequately assessed.Objective To assess the diagnostic value of KPSP as a prescreeningtool for child development compared to that of theDenver II developmental screening test.Methods We conducted a KPSP diagnostic study, using theDenver II test as a gold standard for comparison. Subjects werechildren aged 3 to 60 months. They were recruited from one ofthree settings: hospital, community (child care centers) or schools(kindergarten).Results Of 210 children recruited, 182 were included in ourstudy. The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value(PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and accuracy of KPSPwere 68.8%, 86.6%, 64.7%, 88.6% and 81.9%, respectively. Thecomparison of diagnostic value based on age groups showed betterresults in the 3 - 24 month group than that of the older group.Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the younger group vs. theolder group were 92.3% vs. 60.0%, 78.6% vs. 87.5% and 85.2%vs. 81.3%, respectively.Conclusion The accuracy of KPSP compared to Denver II testwas good for the 3 - 24 month age group. However, this toolshould be revised for the older age group. [Paediatr lndones.2012;52:6-9].
Artesunate-amodiaquine treatment for children with uncomplicated malaria in Kalimantan and Sulawesi: clinical complaints, tolerability and compliance Gitawati, Retno; Isnawati, Ani; Tjitra, Emiliana; Raini, Mariana; Sampurno, Ondri Dwi; Rooslamiati, Indri
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 52 No 1 (2012): January 2012
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (122.755 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi52.1.2012.10-15

Abstract

Background Artesunate-amodiaquine combination (AS+ AQ)is one type of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) andhas been used in Indonesia since 2004 for uncomplicated malaria,both in adults and children. However, its use in the IndonesiaMalaria Program has not yet been evaluated.Objective To evaluate the clinical complaints and tolerabilityto AS+AQ treatment, as well as compliance in children withuncomplicated malaria.Methods This was a cross-sectional study, conducted in sentinelpuskesmas (primary health centers) in Kalimantan and Sulawesi.Subjects were 126 children aged under 15 years, with P. falciparum,P. vivax, or mixed falciparum-vivax malaria infections. All subjectswere treated with a single dose of AS+AQ for three consecutivedays and followed-up 3 times (D3, D7 and D28) to record clinicalcomplaints and tolerability after drug administration. Parents/guardians underwent in-depth interviews on the knowledge,attitudes and practices of the ACT used as well as clinicalcomplaints following AS+ AQ treatment.Results Of the 126 subjects evaluated, 30 were infected with P.falciparum, 5 9 with P. vivax, and 3 7 with both species. About 84% ofthe subjects reported clinical complaints after AS+ AQ administration(DO-DZ), most commonly lethargy, nausea and vomiting, similar tothe clinical symptoms of malaria. All complaints were reported to bemild and tolerable. Only one subject was lost to follow-up.Conclusion Clinical complaints experienced by malaria-infectedchildren following AS+AQ treatment were relatively tolerable.Subjects' compliance to AS+ AQ treatment was satisfactory.[Paediatr lndones. 2012;52:10-5).
Calcium and vitamin D supplementation in children with frequently relapsing and steroid-dependent nephrotic syndrome Septarini, Ayi Dilla; Tambunan, Taralan; Amalia, Pustika
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 52 No 1 (2012): January 2012
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (118.671 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi52.1.2012.16-21

Abstract

Background Children with frequently relapsing and steroiddependentnephrotic syndrome (FRNS/SDNS) are at riskfor osteoporosis due to impaired metabolism of calcium andvitamin D.Objective To determine the effect of calcium and vitamin Dsupplementation on bone mineral density, serum ionized calciumlevels and serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D levels in children withFRNS and SDNS.Methods A clinical trial with a before and after design wasperformed. Subjects were SDNS or FRNS pediatric patients 2: 5years of age. Subjects received 800 mg elemental calcium and 400IU vitamin D supplementation for 8 weeks. Serum ionized calcium,serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D [25(0H)D], and bone mineral density(BMD) were determined before and after the supplementation.Results Of the 30 subjects, 28 completed the study. However,only 20 subjects underwent BMD determination before and aftersupplementation. Of the 28 subjects, 22 had hypocalcemia and 26had low vitamin D levels. Osteopenia was found in 14/20 subjects andosteoporosis was in 2/20 subjects. After 8 weeks of supplementation,mean serum ionized calcium increased from low [1.15 mmol/L (SDO.oJ)] to normal [1.18 mmol/L (SD 0.04)] (P< 0.001) levels, butmean serum 25(0H)D only increased from vitamin D deficiencycategory [20 ng/mL (SD 7 .7)] to vitamin D insufficiency category[25.5 ng/mL (7.7)] (P=0.010). Mean z-score BMD increased from-1.1 (SD 0.9) to -0.7 (SD 0.2) after supplementation (P<0.001).Conclusion Calcium vitamin D supplementation effectively increasedserum ionized calcium, serum 25 (OH)D, and BMD in subjectswith FRNS and SDNS. [Paediatr lndones. 2012;52:16-21].
Television watching time and cognitive development in young children Antari, Anak Agung Ayu Windi; Windiani, I Gusti Ayu Trisna; Ismail, Djauhar
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 52 No 1 (2012): January 2012
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (111.441 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi52.1.2012.32-37

Abstract

Background Television viewing for children is prevalent. Therehave been few Indonesian studies on the association betweenduration of television watching and cognitive development inyoung children.Objective To assess cognitive development in young children whowatched < 1 hour, 1-2 hours, or > 2 hours of television daily.Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study at 6 prekindergartensin Denpasar, Bah. We included 135 subjects in thisstudy. Cognitive development was measured by the Mullen ScalesofEarly Learning (MSEL). Data was analyzed by one-way analysisof variance (ANOVA) test, post-hoc test, and univariate analysisof covariance (ANCOVA) with significance level of P < 0.05.Results There were significant differences among compositestandard score in children who watched television < 1 hour, 1-2hours, and> 2 hours per day (P=0.035). The mean compositestandard score in children who watched television 1-2 hours dailywas 6.087 points higher than in those who watched television< 1 hour daily (P=0.013, 95%CI 1.29 to 10.88) and 4.213points higher than in those who watched television > 2 hoursdaily (P=0.045, 95%CI 1.08 to 8.51). There was an associationbetween television watching time and cognitive development(P=0.001).Conclusion Television watching time was statistically associatedwith cognitive development in young children, where thoseviewing television 1-2 hours daily scoring significantly higher thanthose viewing < 1 hour and > 2 hours daily. [Paediatr lndones.2012;52:32-7].
Correlation between C--reactive protein and serum iron levels in children with pneumonia Purnawan, I Gd. Oki Novi; Subanada, Ida Bagus; Mulatsih, Sri
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 52 No 1 (2012): January 2012
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (110.187 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi52.1.2012.38-42

Abstract

Background Pneumonia is an infectious disease often occuringin children under five years of age. At the time of infection,pro-inflammatory cytokines are released. It is thought that thesepro-inflammatory cytokines cause changes to iron homeostasisin the body.Objective To determine a correlation between CRP and serumiron levels in children with pneumonia.Methods An analytical, cross-sectional study was performedin children aged 6 months-5 years with severe pneumonia atSanglah Hospital, Denpasar, Bali from April-November 2010.Laboratory examinations included CRP and serum iron levels.The correlation between CRP and serum iron levels was analyzedby Pearson's correlation.Results From 69 children with severe pneumonia, 23 childrenfulfilled the inclusion criteria. Subjects' median CRP level was9.22 mg/Land median serum iron level was 25.55 ug/dL. Thecoefficient correlation between CRP and serum iron levels was-0.580 (P=0.004). The determination coefficient value was0.316.Conclusion In children with severe pneumonia, CRP levelcorrelates negatively with serum iron levels. [Paediatr lndones.2012;52:38-42).
Supporting factors and barriers in implementing kangaroo mother care in Indonesia Pratomo, Hadi; Uhudiyah, Uut; Sidi, Ieda Poernomo Sigit; Rustina, Yeni; Suradi, Rulina; Bergh, Anne-Marie; Rogers-Bloch, Quail; Gipson, Reginald
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 52 No 1 (2012): January 2012
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (132.025 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi52.1.2012.43-50

Abstract

Background Kangaroo mother care (KMC) was introduced toIndonesia in the 1990s. Since then, KMC has not been widelyimplemented and has not received national policy support.Objective The objectives of this case study were to implementKMC by an intervention that would ultimately benefit tenhospitals in Java, Indonesia, as well as identify supporting factorsand barriers to KMC implementation.Methods An intervention with four phases was conducted inten hospitals. Two teaching hospitals were supported to serve astraining centers, six hospitals were supported to implement KMCand two other hospitals were supported to strengthen existingKMC practices. The four phases were comprised of a baselineassessment, a five-day training workshop, two supervisory visitsto each hospital, and an end-line assessment.Results A total of 344 low birth weight infants received KMCduring the intervention period. Good progress with regards toimplementation was observed in most hospitals between the firstand second supervisory visits. Supporting factors for KMC were thefollowing: support received from hospital management, positiveattitudes ofhealthcare providers, patients, families and communities,as well as the availability of resources. The most common challengeswere record keeping and data collection, human resources and staffissues, infrastructure and budgets, discharge and follow-up, as wellas family issues. Challenges related to the family were the inabilityof the mother or family to visit the infant frequently to provideKMC, and the affordability of hospital user fees for the infant tostay in the hospital for a sufficient period of rime.Conclusion KM C appeared to be well accepted in most hospitals.For an intervention to have maximum impact, it is importantto integrate services and maintain a complex network ofcommunication systems. [Paediatr lndones. 2012;52:43-50).

Page 1 of 2 | Total Record : 11


Filter by Year

2012 2012


Filter By Issues
All Issue Vol 60 No 3 (2020): May 2020 Vol 60 No 2 (2020): March 2020 Vol 60 No 1 (2020): January 2020 Vol 59 No 6 (2019): November 2019 Vol 59 No 5 (2019): September 2019 Vol 59 No 4 (2019): July 2019 Vol 59 No 3 (2019): May 2019 Vol 59 No 2 (2019): March 2019 Vol 59 No 1 (2019): January 2019 Vol 59 No 3 (2019): May 2019 Vol 59 No 2 (2019): March 2019 Vol 58 No 6 (2018): November 2018 Vol 58 No 5 (2018): September 2018 Vol 58 No 4 (2018): July 2018 Vol 58 No 3 (2018): May 2018 Vol 58 No 2 (2018): March 2018 Vol 58 No 1 (2018): January 2018 Vol 57 No 6 (2017): November 2017 Vol 57 No 5 (2017): September 2017 Vol 57 No 4 (2017): July 2017 Vol 57 No 3 (2017): May 2017 Vol 57 No 2 (2017): March 2017 Vol 57 No 1 (2017): January 2017 Vol 56 No 6 (2016): November 2016 Vol 56 No 5 (2016): September 2016 Vol 56 No 4 (2016): July 2016 Vol 56 No 3 (2016): May 2016 Vol 56 No 2 (2016): March 2016 Vol 56 No 1 (2016): January 2016 Vol 55 No 1 (2015): January 2015 Vol 55 No 6 (2015): November 2015 Vol 55 No 5 (2015): September 2015 Vol 55 No 4 (2015): July 2015 Vol 55 No 3 (2015): May 2015 Vol 55 No 2 (2015): March 2015 Vol 55 No 1 (2015): January 2015 Vol 54 No 6 (2014): November 2014 Vol 54 No 5 (2014): September 2014 Vol 54, No 6 (2014): November 2014 Vol 54, No 5 (2014): September 2014 Vol 54 No 6 (2014): November 2014 Vol 54 No 5 (2014): September 2014 Vol 54 No 4 (2014): July 2014 Vol 54 No 3 (2014): May 2014 Vol 54 No 2 (2014): March 2014 Vol 54 No 1 (2014): January 2014 Vol 53 No 6 (2013): November 2013 Vol 53 No 5 (2013): September 2013 Vol 53 No 4 (2013): July 2013 Vol 53 No 3 (2013): May 2013 Vol 53 No 2 (2013): March 2013 Vol 53 No 1 (2013): January 2013 Vol 52 No 6 (2012): November 2012 Vol 52 No 5 (2012): September 2012 Vol 52 No 4 (2012): July 2012 Vol 52 No 3 (2012): May 2012 Vol 52 No 2 (2012): March 2012 Vol 52 No 1 (2012): January 2012 Vol 51 No 6 (2011): November 2011 Vol 51 No 5 (2011): September 2011 Vol 51 No 4 (2011): July 2011 Vol 51 No 3 (2011): May 2011 Vol 51 No 2 (2011): March 2011 Vol 51 No 1 (2011): January 2011 Vol 50 No 5 (2010): September 2010 Vol 50 No 4 (2010): July 2010 Vol 50 No 2 (2010): March 2010 Vol 50 No 1 (2010): January 2010 Vol 50, No 5 (2010): September 2010 Vol 50, No 4 (2010): July 2010 Vol 50, No 2 (2010): March 2010 Vol 50 No 6 (2010): November 2010 Vol 50 No 5 (2010): September 2010 Vol 50 No 3 (2010): May 2010 Vol 50 No 2 (2010): March 2010 Vol 50 No 1 (2010): January 2010 Vol 49 No 6 (2009): November 2009 Vol 49 No 5 (2009): September 2009 Vol 49 No 4 (2009): July 2009 Vol 49 No 3 (2009): May 2009 Vol 49 No 2 (2009): March 2009 Vol 49 No 1 (2009): January 2009 Vol 48 No 6 (2008): November 2008 Vol 48 No 5 (2008): September 2008 Vol 48 No 4 (2008): July 2008 Vol 48 No 3 (2008): May 2008 Vol 48 No 2 (2008): March 2008 Vol 48 No 1 (2008): January 2008 Vol 47 No 6 (2007): November 2007 Vol 47 No 5 (2007): September 2007 Vol 47 No 4 (2007): July 2007 Vol 47 No 3 (2007): May 2007 Vol 47 No 2 (2007): March 2007 Vol 47 No 1 (2007): January 2007 Vol 46 No 6 (2006): November 2006 Vol 46 No 5 (2006): September 2006 Vol 46 No 4 (2006): July 2006 Vol 46 No 3 (2006): May 2006 Vol 46 No 2 (2006): March 2006 Vol 46 No 1 (2006): January 2006 Vol 45 No 6 (2005): November 2005 Vol 45 No 5 (2005): September 2005 Vol 45 No 4 (2005): July 2005 Vol 45 No 3 (2005): May 2005 Vol 45 No 2 (2005): March 2005 Vol 45 No 1 (2005): January 2005 Vol 44 No 6 (2004): November 2004 Vol 44 No 5 (2004): September 2004 Vol 44 No 4 (2004): July 2004 Vol 44 No 3 (2004): May 2004 Vol 44 No 2 (2004): March 2004 Vol 44 No 1 (2004): January 2004 Vol 43 No 6 (2003): November 2003 Vol 43 No 5 (2003): September 2003 Vol 43 No 4 (2003): July 2003 Vol 43 No 3 (2003): May 2003 Vol 43 No 2 (2003): March 2003 Vol 43 No 1 (2003): January 2003 Vol 42 No 9-10 (2002): September 2002 Vol 42 No 5-6 (2002): May 2002 Vol 42 No 11-12 (2002): November 2002 Vol 42, No 6 (2002): November 2002 Vol 42, No 5 (2002): September 2002 Vol 41 No 9-10 (2001): September 2001 Vol 41 No 7-8 (2001): July 2001 Vol 41 No 5-6 (2001): May 2001 Vol 41 No 3-4 (2001): March 2001 Vol 41 No 11-12 (2001): November 2001 Vol 41, No 6 (2001): November 2001 Vol 41, No 5 (2001): September 2001 Vol 41, No 4 (2001): July 2001 Vol 41, No 3 (2001): May 2001 Vol 41, No 2 (2001): March 2001 Vol 41 No 1-2 (2001): January 2001 Vol 39 No 9-10 (1999): September 1999 Vol 39 No 7-8 (1999): July 1999 Vol 39 No 5-6 (1999): May 1999 Vol 39 No 3-4 (1999): March 1999 Vol 39 No 11-12 (1999): November 1999 Vol 39 No 1-2 (1999): January 1999 Vol 39, No 3-4 (1999): March 1999 Vol 39, No 1-2 (1999): January 1999 Vol 38 No 9-10 (1998): September 1998 Vol 38 No 3-4 (1998): March 1998 Vol 38 No 11-12 (1998): November 1998 Vol 38 No 1-2 (1998): January 1998 Vol 37 No 9-10 (1997): September-October 1997 Vol 37 No 5-6 (1997): May-June 1997 Vol 37 No 3-4 (1997): March-April 1997 Vol 37 No 1-2 (1997): January-February 1997 Vol 37, No 9-10 (1997): September-October 1997 Vol 37, No 5-6 (1997): May-June 1997 Vol 37, No 3-4 (1997): March-April 1997 Vol 37, No 1-2 (1997): January-February 1997 Vol 36 No 7-8 (1996): July-August 1996 Vol 36 No 5-6 (1996): May-June 1996 Vol 36 No 11-12 (1996): November-December 1996 Vol 36, No 7-8 (1996): July-August 1996 Vol 36, No 5-6 (1996): May-June 1996 Vol 36, No 11-12 (1996): November-December 1996 Vol 35 No 1-2 (1995): January 1995 Vol 35 No 9-10 (1995): September 1995 Vol 35 No 7-8 (1995): July 1995 Vol 35 No 5-6 (1995): May 1995 Vol 35 No 3-4 (1995): March 1995 Vol 34 No 7-8 (1994): July 1994 Vol 34 No 5-6 (1994): May 1994 Vol 34 No 3-4 (1994): March 1994 Vol 34 No 1-2 (1994): January 1994 Vol 33 No 7-8 (1993): July 1993 Vol 33 No 5-6 (1993): May 1993 Vol 33 No 3-4 (1993): March 1993 Vol 33 No 1-2 (1993): January 1993 Vol 32 No 7-8 (1992): July 1992 Vol 32 No 5-6 (1992): May 1992 Vol 32 No 3-4 (1992): March 1992 Vol 32 No 11-12 (1992): November 1992 Vol 31 No 5-6 (1991): May 1991 Vol 31 No 3-4 (1991): March 1991 Vol 31 No 11-12 (1991): November 1991 Vol 31, No 11-12 (1991): November 1991 Vol 31 No 9-10 (1991): September 1991 Vol 31 No 7-8 (1991): July 1991 Vol 31 No 5-6 (1991): May 1991 Vol 30 No 11-12 (1990): November 1990 Vol 29 No 3-4 (1989): March 1989 Vol 29 No 1-2 (1989): January 1989 Vol 29, No 9-10 (1989): September 1989 Vol 29, No 5-6 (1989): May 1989 Vol 29, No 1-2 (1989): January 1989 Vol 29 No 9-10 (1989): September 1989 Vol 29 No 7-8 (1989): July 1989 Vol 29 No 5-6 (1989): May 1989 Vol 29 No 3-4 (1989): March 1989 Vol 29 No 11-12 (1989): November 1989 Vol 28 No 9-10 (1988): September 1988 Vol 28 No 7-8 (1988): July 1988 Vol 28 No 3-4 (1988): March 1988 Vol 28 No 11-12 (1988): November 1988 Vol 28 No 5-6 (1988): May 1988 Vol 28 No 1-2 (1988): January 1988 Vol 26 No 4 (1986): July 1986 Vol 25 No 5-6 (1985): May 1985 Vol 24 No 7-8 (1984): July 1984 Vol 24 No 1-2 (1984): January 1984 Vol 24 No 9-10 (1984): September 1984 Vol 24 No 7-8 (1984): July 1984 Vol 24 No 5-6 (1984): May 1984 Vol 24 No 3-4 (1984): March 1984 Vol 24 No 11-12 (1984): November 1984 Vol 24 No 1-2 (1984): January 1984 Vol 22 No 9-10 (1982): September 1982 Vol 22 No 7-8 (1982): July 1982 Vol 22 No 5-6 (1982): May 1982 Vol 22 No 3-4 (1982): March 1982 Vol 22 No 11-12 (1982): November 1982 Vol 22 No 1-2 (1982): January 1982 Vol 22, No 9-10 (1982): September 1982 Vol 22, No 7-8 (1982): July 1982 Vol 22, No 5-6 (1982): May 1982 Vol 22, No 3-4 (1982): March 1982 Vol 22, No 11-12 (1982): November 1982 Vol 22, No 1-2 (1982): January 1982 Vol 21 No 9-10 (1981): September 1981 Vol 21 No 7-8 (1981): July 1981 Vol 21 No 5-6 (1981): May 1981 Vol 21 No 3-4 (1981): March 1981 Vol 21 No 11-12 (1981): November 1981 Vol 21 No 1-2 (1981): January 1981 Vol 21, No 9-10 (1981): September 1981 Vol 21, No 7-8 (1981): July 1981 Vol 21, No 5-6 (1981): May 1981 Vol 21, No 3-4 (1981): March 1981 Vol 21, No 11-12 (1981): November 1981 Vol 21, No 1-2 (1981): January 1981 Vol 20 No 3-4 (1980): March 1980 Vol 19 No 9-10 (1979): September 1979 Vol 19 No 3-4 (1979): March 1979 Vol 19 No 11-12 (1979): November 1979 Vol 19 No 1-2 (1979): January 1979 Vol 18 No 9-10 (1978): September 1978 Vol 18 No 5-6 (1978): May 1978 Vol 18 No 3-4 (1978): March 1978 Vol 18 No 11-12 (1978): November 1978 Vol 18 No 1-2 (1978): January 1978 Vol 16 No 9-10 (1976): September 1976 Vol 16 No 3-4 (1976): March 1976 Vol 16 No 1-2 (1976): January 1976 Vol 15 No 9-10 (1975): September 1975 Vol 15 No 7-8 (1975): July 1975 Vol 15 No 3-4 (1975): March 1975 Vol 15 No 11-12 (1975): November 1975 Vol 15 No 1-2 (1975): January 1975 Vol 14 No 9-10 (1974): September 1974 Vol 14 No 7-8 (1974): July 1974 Vol 14 No 5-6 (1974): May 1974 Vol 14 No 3-4 (1974): March 1974 Vol 14 No 11-12 (1974): November 1974 Vol 14 No 1-2 (1974): January 1974 Vol 13 No 4 (1973): April 1973 Vol 13 No 3 (1973): March 1973 Vol 13 No 2 (1973): February 1973 Vol 13 No 1 (1973): January 1973 Vol 13, No 4 (1973): April 1973 Vol 13, No 3 (1973): March 1973 Vol 13, No 2 (1973): February 1973 Vol 13, No 1 (1973): January 1973 More Issue