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Paediatrica Indonesiana
ISSN : 00309311     EISSN : 2338476X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
Paediatrica Indonesiana is a medical journal devoted to the health, in a broad sense, affecting fetuses, infants, children, and adolescents, belonged to the Indonesian Pediatric Society. Its publications are directed to pediatricians and other medical practitioners or researchers at all levels of health practice throughout the world.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 11 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 52 No 4 (2012): July 2012" : 11 Documents clear
Efficacy of synbiotic and probiotic treatments on acute watery diarrhea in children Rokhmawati, Ani Isti; Damayanti, Wahyu; Julia, Madarina
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 52 No 4 (2012): July 2012
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (106.439 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi52.4.2012.209-12

Abstract

Background In developing countries, acute watery diarrhea isa common cause of morbidity and mortality in children. Givingsynbiotics or probiotics may decrease the severity of diarrhea.Objective To compare the efficacy of synbiotics and probioticsin decreasing the frequency of diarrhea, shortening the duration,and increasing patient body weight.Methods This was a double????blind, randomized clinical trial tocompare the effects of synbiotic vs probiotic treatment in childrenaged 6????59 months v.ith acute watery diarrhea. This study wasperformed from October to December 2010 in two hospitals inCentral Java. Subjects received either synbiotics or probioticstv.ice daily for five days. The measured outcomes were durationof diarrhea, daily frequency of diarrhea, and increase in bodyweight.Results There was no significant difference in the mean durationof the diarrhea in the synbiotic and probiotic groups, 3.92 days(SD 0.79) vs 3.80 days (SD 0.82) ,(P????0.35), respectively. Nor didwe observe a significant difference in the mean increase in bodyweight in the synbiotic and probiotic groups, 150 g (SD 49.7) vs160 g (SD 48.9), (P???? 0.67), respectively.Conclusion We observed no significant differences in efficacy ofsynbiotic and probiotic treatment for management of acute waterydiarrhea. [Paediatr Indones. 2012;52:209,12].
Chest x-ray findings and outcomes of children with suspected ventilator-associated pneumonia Sumarni, Neni; Kosim, Muhammad Sholeh; Supriatna, Mohammad; Sudijanto, Eddy
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 52 No 4 (2012): July 2012
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (184.108 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi52.4.2012.233-8

Abstract

Background Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is anosocomial infection in patients who have received mechanicalventilation (MV), either by endotracheal intubation ortracheostomy, for more than 48 hours. YAP represents 80% ofall hospital-acquired pneumonias. VAP incidence varies from5.1 %-33.3%. The modified clinical pulmonary infection scoreis a criteria for diagnosing suspected YAP and typically includesradiographic evidence. YAP is associated with significantmorbidity and mortality.Objective To determine the relationship between chest x-rayfindings and outcomes in children Mth suspected VAP.Methods This retrospective study was held in Dr. Kariadi Hospitalfrom January - December 2010. Data was collected from medicalrecords of pediatric ICU (PICU) patients with suspected VAP.Chest x-ray findings and patient outcomes were recorded. X-rayfindings were assessed by the on-duty radiologist. Chi square testwas used for statistical analysis.Results Subjects were 30 children consisting of 14 males and 16females. Patient outcomes were 23 patients survived and 7 patientsdied. Chest x-ray findings were categorized into the followinggroups and compared to patient survivability: diffuse infiltrates76.7% (OR=0.694; P=0.532; 95% CI 0.102 to 4.717), localhedinfiltrates 13.3% (OR=4.200; P=0.225; 95% CI 0.470 t037.49),and no infiltrates 10% (OR=1.222; P=0.436; 95% CI 0.593 to0.926). None of the x-ray findings had a significant correlationto patient outcomes.Conclusion There was no significant relationship between chestx-ray findings and outcomes in children with suspected VAP.[Paediatr rndones. 2012;52:233-8].
Obesity accelerates secondary sexual maturity in girls Sari, Meirina; Prawirohartono, Endy Paryanto; Julia, Madarina
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 52 No 4 (2012): July 2012
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (113.89 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi52.4.2012.213-8

Abstract

Background Worldwide incidence of obesity in children isincreasing. Obesity may have many health effects includingadvancement of sexual maturity.Objective T he aim of this study was to assess the timing ofsecondary sexual maturation in obese vs. non????obese girls.Methods Subjects were 105 obese and 105 non????obese girls, aged7 to 8 years who had not entered puberty. Breast and pubic hairgrowth, secondary sexual characteristics, were assessed at baselineand every 4 months for two years. Onset of puberty was defined asTanner stage for secondary sexual maturation of 2: breast Tannerstage II (B2) and/or 2: pubic hair Tanner stage II (P2). Survivalanalyses were used to estimate time to puberty in both groups.Cox regressions were used to analyze possible factors affectingsecondary sexual maturation.Results Mean onset of breast budding (B2) was 7.8 (95% CI 7.7to 7.8) years in obese girls vs. 8.6 (95% CI 8.5 to 8.6) years innon????obese girls (P<O.OOl). Mean onset of pub arc he (P2) was 8.7(95% CI 8.6 to 8.8) years in obese girls vs. 9.0 (95% CI 8.9 to 9.0)years in non????obese girls (P<O.OOl). Hazard ratios of obese girlsto experience an earlier secondary sexual maturation at maturitylevel B2, B3 and P2 were 1.34 (95% CI 1.19 to 1.52), 6.91 (95%CI 3.90 to 12.24) and 3.78 (95% CI 2.42 to 5.89), respectively.Conclusions Obesity was associated with earlier onset ofpuberty in girls. Obese girls entered puberty approximately 3 to9 months earlier than their non????obese peers. [Paediatr Indones.2012;52:213-8].
Tissue doppler imaging in thalassemia major patients: correlation between systolic and diastolic function with serum ferritin level Rohimi, Syarif; Advani, Najib; Sastroasmoro, Sudigdo; Mardiyono, Bambang; Putra, Sukman Tulus; Djer, Mulyadi M.; Subroto, Fajar
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 52 No 4 (2012): July 2012
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (126.114 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi52.4.2012.187-93

Abstract

Background Thalassemia is a major public health problem inIndonesia. Cardiac diseases remain as the main cause of death inthese patients due to iron overload. Although the T2* magneticresonance imaging has been considered as the gold standard forassessing cardiac iron overload but it has limited availability.The tissue doppler imaging (TDI) echocardiography, a fairly newand easy method that is suggested, can detect early abnormalmyocardial iron overload.Objective To assess myocardial systolic and diastolic functionof thalassemic patients using TDI and examine their correlationwith serum ferritin level.Methods A cross????sectional study was conducted from January toMarch 2011 at the Harapan Kita Women and Children Hospital.We performed clinical examination, serum ferritin level, as wellas conventional and tissue doppler echocardiography on allsubjects.Results We included 34 regularly????tranfused patients, of which17 were boys. The mean age of the subjects was 11.6 (SD 4.7years, range 2.6 ???? 20 years). Mean pulse rate and blood pressurewere within normal range. Hemoglobin level at inclusion rangedfrom 5.8 to 6 g/dL. Almost all patients did not receive regularchelation therapy. Median serum ferritin level was 6275 ng/mL(range 2151 - 17,646 ng/mL). Conventional echocardiographyshowed normal systolic function, but some diastolic dysfunctionswere found including E wave abnormalites in 4 patients, A waveabnormalites in 3, and E/A ratio abnormalites found in 3. TheTDI showed decreased systolic function (Sa wave abnormality) in9 patients and diastolic dysfunctions (Ea wave abnormality in 11patients and Aa wave abnormaly in 2). No abnormality was foundin Ea/Aa and ElEa ratios. There was a weak negative correlationbetween ferritin level and Sa wave and Ea wave respectively anda moderately negative correlation between ferritin level and Ea/Aa ratio. There was no correlation between serum ferritin andAa wave or ElEa ratio.Conclusion TDI identifies a greater number of patients Mthsystolic and diastolic myocardial dysfunction than was revealedby conventional echocardiography. There was a weak negativecorrelation between serum ferritin to Sa wave and Ea wave, and amoderately negative correlation between ferritin and Ea/Aa ratio.There was no correlation between serum ferritin and Aa wave orElEa ratio. [paediatr Indones. 2012;52:187,93].
Factors associated with intelligence in young children with Down syndrome Kawanto, Frieda Handayani; Soedjatmiko, Soedjatmiko; Hendarto, Aryono
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 52 No 4 (2012): July 2012
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (113.436 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi52.4.2012.194-9

Abstract

Introduction Despite the considerable number of children withDo\Vll syndrome in Indonesia, there is little data available on thesuccess of intervention programs. This study was performed todefine factors affecting the intelligence of young children withDo\Vll syndrome.Objective To determine factors associated Mth lower intelligencein children with Down syndrome, including growth parametersand participation in intervention programs.Methods This cross????sectional study was undertaken fromDecember 2010 to March 2011. Subjects were 60 childrenwith Down syndrome aged 2????6 years who were enrolled inan intervention program at both the Medical RehabilitationDepartment, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, and the Growthand Development Clinic, Harapan Kita Women's and Children'sHospital. Parents' data was obtained through self history????takingand perusal of medical records. Subjects' anthropometricdata (body weight, body height, and head circumference) wasobtained through measurements using calibrated instruments.A psychologist administered IQ tests on the subjects. Results ofthe anthropometric and IQ tests were given to parents one weekfollowing the examinations.Results From the 111 children with Down syndromeregistered in the intervention programs, 60 children (36boys and 24 girls) met the inclusion criteria. The mean ageof subjects was 4 years 6 months. Most subjects were well????nourished. Fifty????five subjects had microcephaly. Eighty????twopercent of subjects participated in the program regularly and70% of subjects had started in the program at less than 1 yearof age. Subjects' mean IQ was 52.8. Analysis showed thatgirls, subjects who were overweight and obese, subjects withmicrocephaly, those with irregular attendance in the program,and those living under the poverty line were at highest riskfor severe mental retardation.Conclusion Factors associated v.ith the intelligence in childrenwith Down syndrome were female gender, overweight/obesity, severe microcephaly, below????poverty line economic status, andirregular participation in the program. [Paediatr Indones.2012;52:194-9].
Efficacy of salbutamol-ipratropium bromide nebulization compared to salbutamol alone in children with mild to moderate asthma attacks Harumdini, Matahari; Supriyatno, Bambang; Sekartini, Rini
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 52 No 4 (2012): July 2012
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (135.443 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi52.4.2012.200-8

Abstract

Background The efficacy of salbutamol-ipratropiumbromidenebulization in children with moderate asthma attacks remainsunclear, and studies on patients with mild attacks have beenrelatively few, especially in Indonesia. However, it is commonpractice for this drug combination to be given to patients withmild????moderate asthma attacks.Objective To compare the efficacy of salbutamol????ipratropiumbromide nebulization to salbutamol alone in children v.ith mildto moderate asthma attacks.Methods This single-blind, randomized clinical trial was heldin the Department of Child Health at Cipto MangunkusumoHospital, the Tebet Community Health Center, and the MHThamrin Salemba Hospital on children aged 5????18 years withmild to moderate asthma attack. We randomized subjectsto receive either 2.5 mg salbutamol plus 0.5 mg ipratropiumbromide (experimental group) or 2.5 mg salbutamol alone(control group). Nebulization was given twice, with a 20minute interval between treatments. We assessed clinicalscores, vital signs, oxygen saturations, and peak flow rates(PFRs) at baseline, and every 20 minutes up to 120 minutespost-nebulization .Results A total of 46 patients were randomized to either theexperimental or the control group. Subjects had similar baselinemeasurements. At 20 minutes post????nebulization, the percentageincrease of PFR was 19% higher in the experimental group(p????O.OI, 95% CI 1.8 to 47.2). The proportion of PFR reversibilitywas 27% higher in the experimental group, although this resultwas statistically insignificant (P=0.06, 95% CI 0.03 to 0.52).There were no significant differences in clinical scores, oxygensaturations, respiratory rates, or hospitalization rates between thetwo groups. Side effects also did not differ significantly.Concl usion Salbutamol????ipratropium bromide nebulizationimproved PFR measurements better than salbutamol alone.However, other clinical parameters were not significantly differentbetween the two groups. [paediatr lndones. 2012;52:200,8].
Interleukin-6 and highly sensitive C-reactive protein in obese adolescents Kasenda, Michael; Tantura, Suryadi; Warouw, Sarah
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 52 No 4 (2012): July 2012
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (175.447 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi52.4.2012.219-22

Abstract

Background Childhood obesity is a major health concern.Obesity is due to an expansion of adipose tissue mass. This tissueproduces pro????inflarmnatory cytokines, such as interleukin????6 (IL--6).IL????6 is considered to be the chief stimulator of the production ofhighly sensitive C????reactive protein (hsCRP) in the liver. Bothmolecules are responsible for the chronic low????grade inflammatorystate in obese individuals.Objective To assess a correlation between IL????6 and hsCRP inobese adolescents.Methods This cross????sectional study was conducted from Marchto June 2011 in Manado. Subjects were obese and normal bodymass index (BMI) teens aged 13????18 years. Serum glutamicoxaloacetic transaminase (SOOT) and serum glutamic pyruvictransaminase (SOPT) levels were measured to rule out liverimpairment. IL????6 and hsCRP levels were also measured. Data wasanalyzed by Pearson's correlation and linear regression to test forcorrelation between IL--6 and hsCRP levels.Results There was a strongly positive correlation between IL????6and hsCRP levels in obese adolescents (r=0.79 with P<O.OOl).IL--6 and hsCRP levels were not significantly associated in subjectswith normal BMI.Conclusions There was a strongly positive correlation betweenIL--6 and hsCRP levels in obese adolescents, suggestive of anongoing, chronic, low????grade inflammatory state. [PaediatrIndanes.2012;52:219-22].
Delayed cord clamping for prevention of iron deficiency anemia in term infants Siregar, Olga Rasiyanti; Lubis, Bugis; Lubis, Muara; Lubis, Bidasari; Tjipta, Guslihan Dasa
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 52 No 4 (2012): July 2012
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (110.655 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi52.4.2012.223-8

Abstract

Background Iron deficiency childhood is a concern due to its potentially detrimental effectson development, some of which may be irreversible even after irontreatment. Delayed cord clamping may prevent IDA by increasingan infant's iron reserve at birth.Objective We aimed to evaluate the effect of delayed umbilicalcord clamping at birth on the iron status in newborns at age 24hours of life.Methods This randomized, single????blind study was conducted fromMarch to May 2009, at two general hospitals in Medan, NorthSumatera Province. Eligible newborn infants were randomlyassigned to one of two groups: early cord clamping (Eee)performed 15 seconds after delivery or delayed cord clamping(DeC) performed 2 minutes after delivery. Infants were placed ontheir mothers' abdomens before the umbilical cords were clamped.Hematologic status was determined from umbilical cord blood.Results Sixty????three subjects were included in our study, consistingof31 infants in the Eee group and 32 infants in the Dec group.We found that mean neonatal hemoglobin level was higher inthe Dec group than in the Eee group ( 18.4 g% and 16.2 g%,respectively, P=O.OOOl). Also, mean ferritin level was higher inthe Dec group than in the Eee group (556 mg/dL and 329 mg/dL, respectively, p=o.o 15). Other hematological status indicators,including mean hematocrit and mean corpuscular volume (MeV)level, were also higher in the Dec group. However, mean redblood cell levels were not significantly groups. Nor was there a significant level between the Dec and Eee groups.Concl usion Dela y ed cord c l a m p i n g m a y improve ironstatus and prevent IDA in term infants. [Paediatr Indones.2012;52:223-8].
The effect of exclusive breastfeeding on reducing acute respiratory infections in low birth weight infants Tallo, Karolina Trigemayanti; Suandi, I Kompyang Gede; Wandita, Setya
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 52 No 4 (2012): July 2012
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (102.66 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi52.4.2012.229-32

Abstract

Background Infants who are breastfed receive natural protectionagainst certain infections. Despite the known benefits of exclusivebreastfeeding, many Indonesian mothers choose to supplementwith formula. There have been few Indonesian studies on theeffect of exclusive breastfeeding in reducing acute respiratoryinfections in low birth weight infants in their first four monthsof life.Objective To investigate the effect of exclusive breastfeeding inreducing the incidence of acute respiratory infections in low birthweight infants during their first four months of life.Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study on low birthweight babies in Sanglah Hospital, Denpasar. The total numberof subjects was 181. The incidence of acute respiratory infectionsduring the first 4 months of life and the duration of breast feedingwere assessed by questionnaires. Data was analyzed Mth Chisquare and logistic regression tests.Results Infants who were exclusively breastfed for 4 months hada lower risk of acute respiratory infection than those who were notexclusively breastfed (RR 0.07; 95% CI 0.03 to 0.14; P????O.OOI).After adjustment for gestational age, parity, maternal nutritionalstatus, family size, smoke exposure, and history of atopy, infantswho were exclusively breastfed still had a lower risk for acuterespiratory infection than those who were not exclusively breastfed(RR 0.06; 95% CI 0.03 to 0.13; P ???? 0.001)Conclusion Exclusive breastfeeding reduced the risk of acuterespiratory infection in low birth weight infants in the first fourmonths after birth. [Paediatr Indones. 2012;52:229,32].
The relationship between pleural effusion index and mortality in children with dengue shock syndrome Hawarini, Novianti; Kosim, Muhammad Sholeh; Supriatna, Mohammad; Istanti, Yusrina; Sudjanto, Eddy
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 52 No 4 (2012): July 2012
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (184.108 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi52.4.2012.239-42

Abstract

Background Dengue shock syndrome (DSS) mortality rate is stillhigh. The extent of plasma effusion in dengue shock syndromecan be identified in the right lateral decubitus position on chestx????ray, and quantified by the pleural effusion index (PEl). It isthought that PEl value can be used to predict DSS mortality inchildren. Pleural effusion in DSS patients can cause respiratoryfailure and death.Objective To determine the relationship bet ween PEl andmortality in children \\lith DSS.Methods This cross????sectional, retrospective study was held in theDr. Kariadi Hospital, Semarang, Indonesia. Data was taken frommedical records of pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) patientswith DSS from January 2009 to January 2011. DSS diagnosiswas confirmed by clinical and radiological manifestations. PEldiagnosis was established by the presence of fluid in the pleuralcavity on pulmonary radiological examinations. X????rays wereinterpreted by the radiologist on duty at the time. Chi square andlogistic regression tests were used to analyze the data.Results There were 48 subjects with DSS, consisting of 18 males(37.5 %), and 30 females (62.5%). Twenty????nine subjects (60.4%)survived and 19 (39.6%) died. One patient (2.1 %) had PEl <6%,4 (8.3%) had PEl 6-15%, 17 (35.4%) had PEl 15-30%, and26 (54.2%) had PEl> 30% on their x????rays. The mortality rateof DSS with PEl 15-30% was 11.8% (95% CI 0.021 to 0.564;P<0.005) and PEl >30% was 65.4 % (95% CI 3,581 to 99,642;P <0.005).Cone-lution PEl> 15% was a risk factor for mortality in childrenwith DSS. [Paediatr lndanes. 2012;52:239-42].

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