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Paediatrica Indonesiana
ISSN : 00309311     EISSN : 2338476X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
Paediatrica Indonesiana is a medical journal devoted to the health, in a broad sense, affecting fetuses, infants, children, and adolescents, belonged to the Indonesian Pediatric Society. Its publications are directed to pediatricians and other medical practitioners or researchers at all levels of health practice throughout the world.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 11 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 52 No 5 (2012): September 2012" : 11 Documents clear
Characteristics and outcomes of low birth weight infants in Bali Putra, Putu Junara
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 52 No 5 (2012): September 2012
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (104.602 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi52.5.2012.300-3

Abstract

Background The prevalence and the mortality of low birthweight infants are still high. Low birth weight (LBW) births areresponsible for newborn death. LBW infants are easier to sufferserious health problems and death. Lower infant body weightand younger gestational age are determinants of greater risk ofmortality.Objective To determine the characteristics of LBW infants andtheir outcomes in Sanglah Hospital, Denpasar.Methods This prospective study was conducted on all LBWinfants in the nursery from their time of admission until dischargefor the year of 20 11..Results There were 120 LBW infants admitted to SanglahHospital fromJanuary 2011 to December 2011. The prevalenceofLBW was 8.9%. The birth weight group of 1500????2499 gramshad the highest number of infants (79.2%). The gestational agegroup of 33????36 weeks had 53.3% of the infants, while 68.3% ofthe LBW infants were of the appropriate gestational age. Themost common method of delivery was normal spontaneousdelivery (70%). Moderate asphyxia was observed in 25% of thesubjects, while severe asphyxia was observed in 22.5% of subjects.The mortality rate was 24.2%.Conclusions The prevalence of LBW of all newborns in ourhospital was 8.9%. Severe asphyxia was observed in 22.5% ofsubjects. The mortality rate of the LBW infants was 24.2%. OurLBW infants were most cormnonly in the categories of birth weightof 1500????2499 grams, gestational age was between 33????36 weeks,appropriate for gestational age, as well as delivered spontaneously.[Paediatr lndanes. 2012,52:30003].
Effects of live versus heat-killed probiotics on acute diarrhea in young children Indriyani, Atik; Juffrie, Mohammad; Setyati, Amalia
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 52 No 5 (2012): September 2012
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (111.025 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi52.5.2012.249-54

Abstract

Background Diarrhea remains one of the major causes ofmorbidity and mortality in children in developing countries.Probiotics have been shown to be beneficial for decreasing thefrequency and duration of diarrhea. However, the reported effectson reducing the duration of diarrhea have been varied.Objective To compare the effectiveness of live and heat????killedprobiotics in 6????60 month????old children with acute diarrhea fordecreasing duration and frequency of diarrhea and improvingweight gain.Methods We conducted a randomized, single????blind, controlledtrial in children aged 6????60 months with acute diarrhea. Childrenwere randomized into two groups, receiving either live or heat????killed probiotics. All children received standard treatment fordiarrhea and probiotics as adjuvant treatment. The primaryoutcomes were duration and frequency of diarrhea, as well asweight gain. T????test was used for data analysis.Results There were 165 children with acute diarrhea enrolledin this study. They were divided into 2 groups, with 83 childrenreceiving live probiotics and 82 children receiving heat????killedprobiotics. There were no significant differences in diarrhealduration in the two groups. The mean durations of diarrhea inthe live and heat????killed probiotic groups were 3.64 (SD 0.85) daysand 3.74 (SD 0.73) days (P>0.05), respectively. Mean diarrhealfrequencies were also not significantly different, with 3.25 (SD1.44) times per day in the live probiotic group and 3.26 (SD 1.20)times per day in the heat????killed probiotic group (P>0.05). Inaddition, mean weight gain was not significantly different, 'With241.57 (SD 75.84) g in the live prohiotic group and 221.95 (SD85.38) g in the heat-killed prohiotic group (P>0.05).Conclusion There were no significant differences between live andheat????killed probiotics for reducing duration and frequency of diarrhea,as well as in weight gain in children aged 6????60 months 'With acutediarrhea. [paediatr lndones. 2012;52:249-54].
Determinants of infant care practices in Minangkabau ethnic Masruli, Masruli; Basuki, Hari
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 52 No 5 (2012): September 2012
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (102.964 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi52.5.2012.280-3

Abstract

Background Child care practices are important for growthand development, and are influenced by cultural determinants.Indicators of infant care practices have not been determined forthe Minangkabau ethnic group.Objective To determine indicators of infant care among aMinangkabau ethnic community.Methods A cross????sectional study was done in Solok, WestSumatera, a region populated by largely Minangkabau ethnicgroups. Infant feeding care (IFC), infant health care (IHC), infantclean care (ICC), and infant psychosocial stimulation care (IPSe)were the components of infant care used as indicators. Data onthese four components were obtained through interviews withparents and direct observation. A score was assigned to eachcomponent. We used the confirmatory factors analysis (CFA)method to determine whether the indicators were valid in thestudied population.Results We enrolled 417 infants in the study, v.ith a mean age of8.7 months, and 51.6% were female. IFC scores were fairin 72.7%,high in 20.4%, and low in 6.7%. IHC scores were poor in 25.7%,fair in 58.8%, and good in 15.5%. ICC scores were poor in 0.7%,fair in 42.2%, and good in 58.1 %. IPSC scores were poor in 10.6%,fair in 84.9%, and high in 4.5%. On CFA, ICC contributed least tothe indicator model (A: 0.17). ICC and IPSC had fair contributionsto the model (A: 0.5 and 0.47, respectively). Goodness of fit of themodel was good (P>0.05). Root mean square error approximationwas <0.08 and goodness of fit index was >0.9.Conclusions Infant clean care was the most significant contributorto the infant care practice indicator in the Minangkabau ethniccommunity. Similar studies need to be done in other Indonesianethnic groups. [Paediatr Indones. 2012;52:280,3].
Prevalence of urinary tract infection in 2-8-week-old infants with jaundice Trihono, Partini; Dewi, Arfianti Chandra; Gunardi, Hartono; Oswari, Hanifah
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 52 No 5 (2012): September 2012
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (103.902 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi52.5.2012.304-8

Abstract

Background Urinary tract infections (UTI) in infants may manifest in various ways and often appear without symptoms. Previous studies have reported that j aundice has been observed in infants aged less than 8 weeks 'With UTIs. However, a prospective study on the prevalence of UTI in infants with jaundice aged 2????8weeks is warranted in order to improve diagnosing capability and provide prompt treatment.Objective To investigate the prevalence and profiles of UTI in infants with jaundice aged 2????8 weeks.Methods This cross????sectional study was carried out in June-December 2011 in infants with jaundice aged 2????8 weeks. Subjects were patients from the Department of Child Health, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital (CMS), as well as the Pediatric Polyclinics ofBudi Kemuliaan and Thamrin Hospitals. All subjects underwent total, direct and indirect bilirubin examinations, urinalyses and urine cultures.Results Of the 110 subjects recruited, the prevalence of UTI was 18.2%. More boys than girls had UTIs (13 boys, 7 girls). The microorganisms found in subjects v.ith UTIs were Escherichia coli (10/20), Klebsiella pneumoniae (8/20), and Enterobacter aerogenes (2120). Indirect hyperbilirubinemia was found in 5/20 subjects. There were more subjects with UTIs in the non????exclusively breastfed (8/20) and non????breastfed (8/20) groups than in the exclusively breastfed group (4/20), the full term gestational age (GA) group (17/20) than the pretenn GA group (3/20), and the normal birth weight group (15/20) than the low birth weight group (5/20). The median age of jaundice onset was 3.5 days (range lAO days), and the median duration of jaundice was 13.5 days (range 3-56 days).Conclusion The prevalence of UTI in infants aged 2????8 weeks v.ith jaundice was 18.2%. More boys than girls had UTIs. The most common infecting microorganism found in our subjects was Escherichia coli. In daily medical practice, infants with prolonged jaundice of more than 2 weeks should be tested byurin alysis and urine cultures for the presence of UTIs. [Paediatr Indones.2012;52:304-8].
Risk factors for cefotaxime resistance in children with pneumonia Sucipta, Anak Agung Made; Subanada, Ida Bagus; Wahab, Samik
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 52 No 5 (2012): September 2012
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (113.291 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi52.5.2012.255-9

Abstract

Background Pneumonia is a health problem in developingcountries, often caused by bacterial agents. The 'Widespreaduse of cefotaxime, a third????generation of cephalosporin, may leadto increased incidence of resistance to this antibiotic. Severalstudies have reported on risk factors associated v.ith resistanceto cefotaxime.Objective To identify risk factors for cefotaxime resistance inchildren 'With pneumonia.Methods We performed a case????control study at Sanglah Hospitalbetween January 2006????December 2010. The case group includedchildren with blood culture????positive pneumonia and resistanceto cefotaxime by sensitivity test. The control group was selectedfrom the same population as the case group, but the bacteriaisolated from these subjects were sensitive to cefotaxime. Wetested the folloMng risk factors for resistance to cefotaxime:age :53 years, microorganism species, history of antimicrobialuse, and history of hospitalization within the prior 3 months.Chi square test and logistic regression analysis were performedto determine any associations between the four potential riskfactors and resistance to cefotaxime. A P<0.05 was consideredto be statistically significant.Results Univariate analysis showed that the risk factors forresistance to cefotaxime were history of antimicrobial use in theprior 3 months (OR 2.79; 95%CI 1.40 to 5.55; P????O.OOI) andhistory of hospitalization Mthin the prior 3 months (OR 5.57;95%CI 1.95 to 15.87; P=<O.OOOl). By multivariate analysis,risk factors associated Mth resistance to cefotaxime were historyof antimicrobial use in the prior 3 months (OR 2.4; 95%CI 1.18to 4.86; P=0.015), history of hospitalization within the prior 3months (OR 4.7; 95%CI 1.62 to 13.85; P????0.004), and historyof breast feeding for less than 2 months (OR 2.3; 95%CI 1.0 to5.4; P????0.042).Conclusion History of antimicrobial use and history ofhospitalization within the prior 3 monthsweresignificantrisk factors for resistance to cefotaxime in children Mth pneumonia.[Paediatr Indanes. 2012;52:255-9].
Efficacy of artemether-lumefantrine and artesunate-amodiaquine for treating uncomplicated falciparum malaria in children Faranita, Tri; Pasaribu, Ayodhia Pitaloka; Ali, Muhammad; Lubis, Munar; Pasaribu, Syahril
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 52 No 5 (2012): September 2012
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (120.7 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi52.5.2012.260-6

Abstract

Background Artesunate-amodiaquine (ASAQ) has been usedas a firsdine treatment for uncomplicated faldparum malariain Indonesia since 2004. Its efficacy depends on amodiaquineresistance of the infecting parasites. Artemether-lumefantrine(AL) has been shown to be highly efficacious in treatinguncomplicated faldparum malaria in several countries. However,there have been few studies on these anti-malarial medicationsin Indonesia.Objective To compare the efficacy of AL to ASAQ for treatinguncomplicated faldparum malaria in children.Methods An open, randomized, controlled trial wasconducted in school-aged children in the Mandailing NatalRegency, North Sumatera Province, Indonesia, from Octoberto December 2010. A total of 280 pediatric, uncomplicatedfalciparum malaria patients were randomly assigned to receiveeither AL or ASAQ for 3 days. Participants were followed-up ondays 1,2,3,7, 14, 28 and 42 following the first medication dose.The outcomes noted were adequate clinical and parasitologicalresponse (ACPR), parasite reduction, parasite clearance time,fever clearance time and adverse events. Analysis was basedon intention-to-treat.Results In this study, ACPRs on day 42 were 86.4% and 90.7%for the ASAQ and AL groups, respectively (p=0.260). On days 7and 14, the AL group had higher cure rates than that of the ASAQgroup (P<0.05). Early treatment failure, late treatment failure andparasitological failure for both groups were similar. We also foundfaster parasite clearance time and higher parasite reduction in theAL group than in the ASAQ group. However, fever clearancetime was shorter in the ASAQ group. The incidence of adverseevents such as nausea, vomiting, malaise, and pruritus were similarbetween the two groups (P=0.441).Conclusion AL had higher efficacy than ASAQ for the treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria in children.[Paediatr rndones. 2012;52:260-6].
The relationship of body mass index to penile length and testicular volume in adolescent boys Adriansyah, Rizky; Ali, Muhammad; Hakimi, Hakimi; Deliana, Melda; Lubis, Siska Mayasari
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 52 No 5 (2012): September 2012
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (204.744 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi52.5.2012.267-71

Abstract

Background Evidence suggests that obesity may be related toearly onset of puberty in girls. However, few studies have found alink between body mass index (BMI) and puberty onset in boys.More study is needed to assess the relationship of BMI to penilelength and testicular volume.Objective To investigate the relationship ofBMI to penile lengthand testicular volume in adolescent boys.Methods A cross????sectional study was carried out on adolescentboys aged 9 to 14 years in Secanggang District, Langkat Regency,North Sumatera Province in August 2009. Subjects' BMIs werecalculated by dividing body weight (BW) in kilograms by bodyheight (BH) in meters squared. Penile length (em) was measuredwith a spatula. We took the average of three measurements fromthe symphysis pubis to the tip of the glans penis. Testicular volume(mL) was estimated by palpation using an orchidometer. Pearson'scorrelation test (r) was used to assess the relationship of BMI topenile length and BMI to testicular volume.Resu lts There were 108 participants, consisting of 64primary school students and 44 junior high school students.Subjects' mean age was 11.7 (SO 1.62) years; mean BWwas 35.2 (SO 8.48) kg; mean BH was 1.4 (SO 0.11) m;mean BMI was 17.5 (SO 2.34) kg/m'; mean penile lengthwas 4.5 (SO 1.25) cm; and mean testicular volume was 3.6(SD 1.20) mL. We found no significant association betweenBMI and penile length (r????-0.25, P????0.06), nor betweenBMI and testicular volume (r????-O.21; P????O.09).Conclusion T here was no significant relationship ofBMI to penilelength nor BMI to testicular volume in adolescent boys.[Paediatr lndanes. 2012;52:267-71].
Comparison of cardiac dysfunction in thalassemia major patients using deferoxamine or deferiprone as an iron-chelating agent Josep, Rosalina; Wahidiiyat, Pustika Amalia; Trihono, Partini; Yanuarso, Piprim
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 52 No 5 (2012): September 2012
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (135.502 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi52.5.2012.272-9

Abstract

Background In thalassemia major (TM) patients, major mortalityis due to cardiac hemosiderosis. Several types of iron chelatingagent available recently are given to overcome this problemObjective To compare cardiac dysfunction in thalassemia majorpatients who used subcutaneous deferoxamine (DFO) to thosewho used oral deferiprone (DFP) as an iron????chelating agent.Methods This cross????sectional study was held at the ThalassemiaCenter, Department of Child Health????Cipto MangunkusumoHospital (DCH????CMH), Jakarta. We included TM patients aged1O????18 years Mth a mean pre????transfused hemoglobin level of 2:.7g/dL in the prior year, and who had used DFO or DFP for atleast 1 year v.ith good compliance, at a standard dose of DFO at40-60 mg/kg/day for 5 days a week or DFP at 50-100 mg/kg/day.We excluded TM patients v.ith congenital heart disease or overtheart failure. Trans????thoracal echocardiography was performed atthe Integrated Cardiac Service, CMH by a pediatric cardiologistusing the conventional method and tissue Doppler imaging (TD I)consecutively, and within 2 weeks of the subject's receiving apacked red blood cell (PREC) transfusion. The 57 TM subjectsconsisted of 19 DFO users and 38 DFP users.Results In our subjects, diastolic dysfunction was more commonlyseen than systolic dysfunction, especially moderate diastolicdysfunction. In the DFO group, diastolic dysfunction only wasdetected in 3/19 subjects, systolic dysfunction only in 1/19 subjects,and both diastolic and systolic dysfunction in 15/19 subjects. Noneof the DFO users had normal cardiac function. In the DFP group,diastolic dysfunction only was seen in 6/38 subjects, and bothdiastolic and systolic dysfunction in 30/38 subjects, while 2/38subjects had normal cardiac function.Conclusion Diastolic and/or systolic dysfunction was detected inthe majority of subjects, but with preserved global cardiac function.We found that cardiac dysfunction was not significantly different inthe two iron chelator groups. For all subjects, diastolic dysfunction was seen in 89% of cases, while systolic dysfunction was detectedin 77% of cases. [Paediatr Indones. 2012;52:272,9].
Congenital malformations in the neonatal unit of Arifin Achmad Hospital, Pekanbaru: occurrence and trends Wisnumurti, Dewi Anggraini
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 52 No 5 (2012): September 2012
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (107.249 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi52.5.2012.284-8

Abstract

Background Congenital malformations are a global and continualissue, contributing to neonatal mortality. The incidence andprevalence, as well as distribution of congenital malformationsvary among countries.Objective To determine the 'prevalence, distribution, and trendsin congenital malformations which are important to develop plansto cope Mth the problem.Methods We reviewed all cases of congenital malformationsadmitted to the Neonatal Unit, Department of Child Health,Arifin Ahmad Hospital from 2008 to 2010. Data were collectedfrom medical records. Diagnoses of congenital malformationswere established by history-taking, physical examination,and specific laboratory tests. Trends in the distribution ofcongenital malformation types, as well as clinical outcomes werehighlighted.Results During the study period there were 2,317 infants admit-ted to the Neonatal Unit, 724 in 2008, 772 in 2009, and 821 in2010. Most patients were referred by other hospitals, at the ageof 0-3 days. Most patients had normal birth weight and were de-livered vaginally. Of the 2,317 infants, 302 were diagnosed withcongenital malformations; the most common congenital malfor-mations were of the digestive tract. The distribution of anomalytypes was relatively constant over time, but the proportion ofpatients Mth congenital malformations discharged alive increasedin the latter two years of the 3-year period studied.Conclusion Most infants in our study had congenital malforma-tions involving the gastrointestinal tract. Distribution trendswere constant over time. Further efforts should be made to bettermanage future cases. [Paediatr lndones. 2012;52:284,8].
Neonatal iodine status survey by thyroid-stimulating hormone screening in Surabaya Untario, Connie; Suryawan, I Wayan Bikin
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 52 No 5 (2012): September 2012
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (165.67 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi52.5.2012.289-93

Abstract

Background Iodine deficiency disorders (lDD) are a significantpublic health problem globally. Iodine deficiency may causesubclinical hypothyroidism during pregnancy and early infancy.Neonatal thyroid screening of serum thyroid????stimulating hormone(TSH) to detect hypothyroidism may also be used to determinethe prevalence of IDD in a population. Previous studies reportedmild ID D status in different parts of Indonesia.Objective To evaluate the iodine status of neonates born inMitra K eluarga Surabaya Hospital (MKSH) by TSH screeningover a 6????year period.Methods T his is a cross????sectional and hospital????based studyconducted in MKSH from January 2005 to December 2010. Ofthe 5,619 infants born in MKSH during the study period, 3,349(59.6%) healthy infants took part in this study. Blood specimensfor TSH measurement were collected from subjects 2 to 6 daysafter birth, and sent to a reference laboraratory for evaluation.Using the neonatal TSH values, the iodine deficiency level ofthe group was determined according to the WHO/UNICEF/International Council for the Control of IDD criteria.Results A total of 3,349 newborn babies underwent neonatalTSH screening in MKSH. Subjects' mean TSH concentrationwas 5.14 mIU!L. A TSH concentration> SmIU!L was found in1270 (37.9%) subjects, 166 (27.6%) in 2005, 252 (44.0%) in 2006,331 (47.1 %) in 2007, 356 (57.7%) in 2008, 114 (20.7%) in 2009and 51 (16.8%) in 2010. On the basis of the WHO/UNICEF/International Council for the Control of Iodine DeficiencyDisorder criteria, this frequency corresponded to a moderate levelof IDD. Twenty????two neonates had TSH > 20 mIU!L from which2 infants were confirmed positive for hypothyroidism.Conclusion A 6????year study of 3,349 newborns screened for TSHrevealed that 37.9% of subjects had TSH concentration of morethan SmIU!L. This frequency indicates a moderate level of IDDin the study population. [Paediatr Indones. 2012;52:289,93].

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