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Paediatrica Indonesiana
ISSN : 00309311     EISSN : 2338476X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
Paediatrica Indonesiana is a medical journal devoted to the health, in a broad sense, affecting fetuses, infants, children, and adolescents, belonged to the Indonesian Pediatric Society. Its publications are directed to pediatricians and other medical practitioners or researchers at all levels of health practice throughout the world.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 11 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 54 No 1 (2014): January 2014" : 11 Documents clear
Breastfeeding practices in mothers: a qualitative study Marzuki, Nanis S.; Yohmi, Elizabeth; Nainggolan, Eveline; Hegar, Badriul; Oswari, Hanifah; Partiwi, I Gusti Ayu Nyoman
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 54 No 1 (2014): January 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (117.439 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi54.1.2014.35-41

Abstract

Background Despite the WHO and UNICEF recorrunendations, the well-known breastfeeding benefits, and the efforts to promote and support breastfeeding; exclusive breastfeeding by Indonesian mothers remains low and contributes to high infant mortality rates.Objective To elucidate the fac tors that influence mothers' choices for infant feedingMethods This qualitative study was conducted as part of a nationwide survey. The study included 36 in-depth interviews of mothers with infants aged 0-11 months, and health care professionals, including general practitioners, pediatricians, and midwives. This study was performed between 0 cto ber - November 2 0 l 0 in both rural and urban areas of 4 provinces in Indon esia.Results We found that most mothers intended to breastfeed and had positive perceptions of breastfeeding. However, mothers faced many challenges in the practice of exclusive and proper breastfeeding. Additionally, the perceived definition of exclusive breastfeeding varied among the participants, leading to n on-exclusive breastfeeding attitudes. The most frequent reasons for mothers to introduce additional milk formula or food were the perception of an inadequate milk supply, infant dissatisfaction or fu ssiness after feeding. Different perceptions were also demonstrated in different regions and the varying levels of socioeconomic status. Health care practitioners (HCPs) were the most reliable source for giving adequate information, but unfortunately, they were not easily accessible and provided inconsistent information. Consequently, closely-related family members were the major contributors of information to a mother'schoice of infant feeding; because they were easily accessible.Conclusion Factors influencing mothers in their breastfeeding practices are their basic knowledge, demographic and socioeconomic status, as well as the availability of support from closelyrelatedfamily members, friends, and HCPs.
Soy-based infant nutrition: a review Vandenplas, Yvan; Hegar, Badriul
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 54 No 1 (2014): January 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (85.179 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi54.1.2014.62-6

Abstract

Dietary consumption of soy varies worldwide.In Asia, people traditionally consume largequantities of soy, while in Europe, soy is notpart of the traditional or daily eating habits.The USA is a major soy producer. The mean intake ofisoflavones by an adult is 8 - 50 mg/day in Asia but only0.5 - 3.5 mg/day in the Western world.1 The soy intakeof a vegetarian is 3 - 12 mg/day and a vegan achievesan intake of 15-60 mg/day.2In the early 1900s, soy-protein preparationswere the only option for the treatment of cow's milkprotein allergy (CMPA) . The first report of the use ofa soybean -based formula for infants dates from 1909.3Most soy drinks are not enriched with zinc, iron,calcium, phosphorous, methionine, or carnitine. Soydrinks also do not contain soy isolate. Soy productsthat do not fulfill the criteria to be an infant formulaare not adapted for infant feeding.
Effect of glucocorticoid therapy on adrenal function in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia Widyapuri, Gita; Gatot, Djajadiman; Pulungan, Aman Bakti; Hegar, Badriul
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 54 No 1 (2014): January 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (127.077 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi54.1.2014.15-21

Abstract

BackgroundGlucocorticoids play an important role in thetreatment ofacute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), but can causeside effects such as suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitaryadrenal (HPA) axis. Suppression of the HPA axis causes adrenal insufficiency, disturbs the cortisol response to stress, and may be a cause of morbidity and mortality in children with ALL.ObjectiveTo evaluate adrenal function in children with ALL afterinduction chemotherapy with high dose glucocorticoids.MethodsThe adrenal function of 20 children with ALL wasevaluated using a standard dose (250 μ g) adrenocorticotropinhormone (ACTH) test performed before and after a 6 week oftreatment with glucocorticoids induction phase chemotherapy,which was followed by a week period tapering off. Adrenalinsuffien cy was defined as blood cortisol level of < 18 μg/dLResultsAdrenal insufficiency was found in 14/20 subjects afterthe induction phase followed by a week period of tapering off.Median cortisol levels pre- and post-stimulation before inductionphase were 14.72 (range 2.0 1- 46. 1) μg/dL and 29.29 (range 21.65 - 55 .15) μg/dL, respectively. Median cortisol levels pre- and poststimulation after induction phase were 5.87 (range 0.2 - 20.53)μg/dL and 10.49 (range 0.33 - 28.69) μg/dL, respectively. Clinicalsigns and symptoms did not differ between those with and withoutadrenal insufficiency.ConclusionOf 20 children with ALL, 14 develop adrenalinsufficiency after a 6-week induction therapy with glucocorticoidsand followed by a week period of tapering off. No specific clinicalsigns and symptoms are identified to be related to the adrenalinsufficiency.
Factors associated with oxygenation improvement in children with ARDS Chairy, Abdul; Nurnaningsih, Nurnaningsih; Prawirohartono, Endy P.
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 54 No 1 (2014): January 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (106.969 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi54.1.2014.42-5

Abstract

Background In pediatric patients, acute respiratory distresssyndrome (ARDS) has a high mortality rate of approximately25%. In surviving children, ARDS may result in sequelae, suchas restrictive or obstructive lung dysfunction, muscle weaknessand hypotrophy, as well as psychiatric, intelligence, and memoryproblems.Objective To identify prognostic factors related to oxygenationimprovement in children with ARDS.Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study in the pediatricintensive care unit (PICU) ofSardjito Hospital, Yogyakarta.We included 20 children aged 29 days to 18 years who fulfilled theARDS criteria. They underwent lung recruitment maneuver for1 hour. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess for possibleassociations between potential prognostic factors and oxygenationimprovement.Results None of the subjec ts had significant hemodynamicchanges or hypercapnea during lung recruitment. Two prognosticfactors from our univariate analysis, namely type of ARDS (RR0.17; 95% CI 0.023 to 1.23; P= 0.079) and severity of ARDS(RR 0.74; 95% CI 0.007 to 0.84) , were analyzed by multivariatelogression test. However, the results were not statisticallysignificant for type of ARDS (RR 0.33; 95% CI0.009 to 1.41) orseverity of ARDS (RR 0.11; 95%CI 0.009-3.25).Conclusion We do not identify any prognostic factors, includingtype and severity of ARDS, associated with oxygenationimprovement in children with ARDS.
Association between specific language impairment and behavioral disorders among preschool children Kesuma, Yudianita; Rismarini, Rismarini; Theodorus, Theodorus; Azhar, Mutiara Budi
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 54 No 1 (2014): January 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (110.559 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi54.1.2014.22-7

Abstract

BackgroundSpecific language impairment (SU) is the mostcommon developmental disorder in preschool children, causingserious impairmentE on behavioral development. To date, there havebeen few studies on SU and behavioral disorders in Palembang.ObjectiveTo assess for an association between SU and behavioraldisorders in preschool children in Palembang.MethodsSubjects in this cross-sectional study were childrenwho attended kindergarten. Their general characteristics,developmental history and physical examination results (includingweight and height) were recorded. We administered the SpecificLanguage Impairment checklist for language impairment and thePediatric Symptom Checklist 17 (PSC 17) for behavioral disorders.Data was analyzed by Chi-square test.ResultsWe studied 1,340 children from21 kinderg:irtens in Palembang.Prevalence of SU was 12.9%, consisting of expressive languageimpairment (10.2%), receptive impairment (0.5%) and mixed languageimpairment (2 .2%). The prevalence of behavioral disorders was15.1 %, consisting of internalization disorder (6.0%), externalizationdisorder (5.0%), attentive disorder (0.4%), and various combinationsof three disorders (3. 7%). A highly significant association was foundbetween SU and behavioral disorders (P=0.000; OR=2.082; 95%CI 1. 419-3 .053. Expressive language impairment was associated withexternalization and mixed behavioral disorders. Mixed languageimpairment was associated with internalization, attentive, and mixedbehavioral disorders. Howevei; receptive language disorder was notassociated with any behavioral disorders.ConclusionSU is significantly as sociated with behavioraldisorders. With regards to the individual SU types, expressivelanguage impairment is associated with externalization and mixedbehavioral disorders; mixed language impairment is associatedwith internalization, attentive and mixed behavioral disorders;but receptive language disorder is not associated with behavioraldisorders.
Probiotic Weisella paramesenteroides on enteropathogenic E. coli-induced diarrhea Aslinar, Aslinar; Jurnalis, Yusri Dianne; Purwati, Endang; Sayoeti, Yorva
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 54 No 1 (2014): January 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (155.867 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi54.1.2014.1-8

Abstract

Background Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is a causative agent of intestinal inflammation and microfloral imbalance, leading to diarrhea. The presence of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the feces is an indicator of inflammation in the intestinal mucosa. Dadih, (local made of fermented buffalo milk), contains probiotics and is widely consumed by the people in West Sumatera, Indonesia. Weisella paramesenteroides, a probiotic lactic acid bacteria (LAB), has been isolated from dadih and is believed to be useful for improving intestinal microflora balance and inhibiting the activity of harmful microbes. Objective To determine the efficacy of W. paramesenteroides administration in various doses and durations on bowel frequency, stool’s TNF-α levels, and intestinal microflora balance on mice with EPEC-induced diarrhea. Method This randomized experimental animal study examined two factors relating to the effects of W. paramesenteroides on EPEC-induced diarrhea, namely doses of probiotics (factor A), and durations of observation (factor B). The subjects consisted of 100 male white mice (Mus musculus) aged 8 weeks, with weights of 25-30 grams. The outcomes measured were bowel frequency, stool’s TNF-α levels, and the balance of intestinal microflora on mice with EPEC-induced diarrhea.  Subjects were divided into 5 groups: the negative control group (received neither EPEC nor probiotic), positive control group (received only EPEC), and three experimental groups (received EPEC and different doses of W. paramesenteroides ). Probiotics were given twice at the 12-hours and 24-hours for the experimental groups, while the durations of observation conssited of baseline, 12 hours, 24 hours, and 36 hours. Results After 36 hours, subjects with EPEC-induced diarrhea who received W. Paramesenteroides administration in doses of 2 x 108 (A3), were found to have the largest decline of mean defecation (a 4.4-fold decline) and the largest decline of stool’s mean TNF-α levels (48.3 pg/mL), compared to the positive control group, and other experimental groups who received higher doses of probiotics.
Efficacy of mebendazole and levamisole, alone or in combination, for soil-transmitted helminthiasis Sihite, Ifo Faujiah; Ali, Muhammad; Pasaribu, Ayodhia P.; Pasaribu, Syahril; Lubis, Chairuddin P.
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 54 No 1 (2014): January 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (113.465 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi54.1.2014.9-14

Abstract

BackgroundThe World Health Organization (WHO) recommends four, single-dose drugs (albendazole, levamisole, mebendazole, and pyrantel pamoate) for management of soil­transmitted helminthiasis (STH). Previous studies have shown varied and inconsistent outcomes of these STH treatments.ObjectiveTo compare the efficacy of mebendazole and levami­sole, alone or in combination, for the treatment of STH.MethodsAn open randomized controlled trial was conducted in Secanggang, North Sumatera from August to October 2009. School-aged children with STH infection were randomized into three groups. Group I received a single dose of mebendazole (500 mg); group II received a single dose of levamisole (2.5 mg/kg); and group III received a single dose of mebendazole-levamisole combined. Stool samples were collected at baseline, and the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th weeks after treatment and examined by the Kato-Katz technique. Statistical analyses were Kruskal-Wallis test for cure rate and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) test for egg reduction rate. ResultsSTH was diagnosed in 197 children with the following parasite species: Ascariasis (96 children, 48.7%), Trichuriasis (58 children, 29.4%), and mixed infection (43 children, 21.8%). We found no hookworm infection in any of our subjects. Groups I and III had significantly higher efficacy (P=0.0001) against STH (egg reduction rate 99.3% and 99.9%; cure rate 92.2% and 98.4%, respectively) at 4th week of treatment.ConclusionA single dose of mebendazole alone and combined with levamisole have better efficacy compared to a single dose of levamisole for the treatment of STH. The highest efficacy of these treatments is noted at the 4th week after drug administration
Exposure to cow’s milk as a prognostic factor for atopic dermatitis during the first three months of life Widyanti, Putu Ayu; Wati, Ketut Dewi Kumara; Prawirohartono, Endy P.
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 54 No 1 (2014): January 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (119.023 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi54.1.2014.28-34

Abstract

Background The incidence of atopic dermatitis has increased inthe early life of children. Cow's milk, the first foreign protein towhich infants are exposed, is predicted to be a prognostic factorof atopic dermatitis.Objective To determine if exposure to cow's milk is a prognosticfactor for atopic dermatitis during the first three months oflife.Methods We performed a cohort study involving 136 newbornsfrom families with and without histories of atopy in SanglahHospital, Denpasar, between April to August 20 12. Subjects wereallocated into 2 groups, those who were exposed to cow's milk(n=68) and not exposed to cow's milk (n=68). We analyzedthe impact of several possible prognostic variables on atopicdermatitis at 3 months of age including exposure to cow's milk,birth weight, sex, gestational age, exposure to cigarette smoke,early solid feeding, and history of atopy in the mother, the father,or both, as well as maternal consumption of chicken eggs whennursing. Data were analyzed with Cox's proportional hazardfunction. The cumulative incidence and incidence rate in eachgroup were calculated.Results Exposure to cow's milk in the first 3 months of liferesulted in a cumulative incidence of atopic dermatitis of 17 .6%,with an incidence rate of atopic dermatitis of 54.5%. However,multivariate analysis showed that cow's milk exposure was nota significant prognostic factor for atopic dermatitis (HR 1.3 7;95%CI 0.22 to 8.43).Conclusion Cow's milk exposure is not a prognostic factor ofatopic dermatitis during the first three months of life
Artesunate-amodiaquine versus artesunatesulfadoxine- pyrimethamine for uncomplicated falciparum malaria in children Rampengan, Novie H.; Metusala, Jane; Chandra, Ronald; Salendu, Praevilia
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 54 No 1 (2014): January 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (114.449 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi54.1.2014.46-51

Abstract

Background Malaria is a major cause of morbidity and mortalityin children, especially in developing countries. Art emisinincombination therapy (ACT) has higher rates of parasite clearanceand inhibition of anti-malarial drugs resistance than non-ACT.Hence, we compared the efficacies of artesunate-amodiaquine(AS-AQ) versus artesunate-sulfadoxine pyrimethamine (AS-SP)combination therapies in children with uncomplicated falciparummalaria.Objective To compare the fever clearance time, parasite clearancetime, and length of hospital stay in uncomplicated falciparummalaria patients treated with AS-AQ and AS-SP.Methods We reviewed the medical records of children aged 1- 14years with uncomplicated falciparum malaria admitted to Prof.Dr. R. D. Kandou Hospital between January 2002 - June 2010.Treatment efficacy was evaluated by fever clearance time, parasiteclearan ce time, and length of hospital stay. The differencesof treatment efficacy between the two groups of therapy werean alyzed by independent T test.Results We identified 185 children with uncomplicatedfalciparum malaria, 104 cases were treated with AS-AQ whilethe other 81 received AS-SP. Parasite clearance time was shorterin AS-AQ group than in AS-SP group at 1.38 (SD 0.69) versus1.91 (SD 0.93) days, respectively (95%CI of differences 0.3 0 to0. 76, P<0.05) . The length of hospital stay was shorterin AS-AQgroup than in the AS-SP group, at 5.01 (SD 1.22) versus 6.04(SD 0.98) days, respectively (95%CI of differences 0. 71 to 1.35,P < 0.05). However, there was no statistically significant differencein fever clearance time between the groups.Conclusion AS-AQ combination therapy reduces parasiteclearance time and length of hospital stay compared to AS-SP46 • Paediatrlndones, Vol. 54, No. 1, January 2014combination therapy in children with uncomplicated falciparummalaria.
Soil-transmitted helminth infection and skin prick test reactivity in children Lubis, Schenny Regina; lrsa, Lily; Evalina, Rita; Supriatmo, Supriatmo; Sjabaroeddin, M.
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 54 No 1 (2014): January 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (108.629 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi54.1.2014.52-6

Abstract

Background Allergic diseases cause an increasingly largeburden in developed countries and in urban areas of middleincomecountries . Paras itic infections may induce allergicresponses in humans, particularly soil-transmitted helminth(STH) infections that are prevalent in childhood in developingcountries. Although soil-transmitted helminth infec tions havebeen associated with lower prevalence of allergen skin testreactivity, study outcomes remain inconclusive.Objective To analyze for an association between STH infectionsand skin prick test reactivity in children.Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study in August 2009among primary school students aged 7- 12 years, at SecanggangSubdistrict, Langkat District, North Sumatera Province. Sixtyeight children were recruited in this study consisted of 34 childrenwith STH infections and the other 34 children without any STHinfection. Soil-transmitted helminth infections were determinedby Kato-Katz stool examination s. All subjects underwent skinprick tests for seven allergens. Results were con sidered to bepositive if wheal diameters 2: 3 mm and negative when whealdiameters < 3 mm. Data was an alysed by Chi-square test.Results Stool examinations revealed that the most commoninfec tion was T. trichiura (18/34 subjects), followed by mixedinfections (T. trichiura and A lumbricoides; 12/34 subjects), andA. lumbricoides (4134 subjects). There was a significant associationbetween STH infections and negative skin prick test (P= 0.002).In addition, there were significant associations with negative skinprick tests for each helminth type: A. lumbricoides (P=0.001) ,T. trichiura (P=0.01) and mixed infection (P = 0.006). Severeinfection intensity was also significantly associated with negativeskin prick tests (P=0.031) .Conclusion Children with STH infections tend to have negativeskin prick test results.

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