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Paediatrica Indonesiana
ISSN : 00309311     EISSN : 2338476X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
Paediatrica Indonesiana is a medical journal devoted to the health, in a broad sense, affecting fetuses, infants, children, and adolescents, belonged to the Indonesian Pediatric Society. Its publications are directed to pediatricians and other medical practitioners or researchers at all levels of health practice throughout the world.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 11 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 54 No 2 (2014): March 2014" : 11 Documents clear
Uric acid and blood pressures in low birth weight 7-year-olds Linardi, Paulus; Umboh, Adrian; Tatura, Suryadi NN
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 54 No 2 (2014): March 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (92.486 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi54.2.2014.114-7

Abstract

Background Low birth weight (LBW) has been associated withincreased cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension, duringadulthood. Nephrogenesis impairment in LBW may lead to anincrease of uric acid and hypertension.Objective To assess for a correlation between uric acid and bloodpressures in LBW children.Methods This study was conducted from January to April 20 12.A comparative and correlative analytic-observational study with across-sectional method was done in children aged 7-8 years, bornat Prof. Dr. RD Kandou General Hospital and living in Manado.Forty-eight LBW children and 48 normal birth weight (NBW)children were included in this study. All children underwent uricacid level and blood pressures measurements.Results Mean uric acid level in LBW children was significantlyhigher than in NBW children (P = 0.001) . There was no correlationbetween uric acid and blood pressures in LBW children(r=0.13,P> 0.05 for systolic blood pressure; r=0.05, P> 0.05 for diastolicblood pressure).Conclusioru; LBW children have higher uric acid levels thanNBW children, but no correlation is found between uric acid leveland blood pressures.
Anemia among children and adolescents in a rural area Widjaja, Ivan Riyanto; Widjaja, Felix Firyanto; Santoso, Lucyana Alim; Wonggokusuma, Erick; Oktaviati, Oktaviati
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 54 No 2 (2014): March 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (126.459 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi54.2.2014.88-93

Abstract

Background Anemia in children and adolescents affects growthand development. It is a preventable disease, but unfortunately isoften ignored until the symptoms occur. There have been limitedreports on the prevalence of anemia in children and adolescentsin Indonesia, especially from rural areas.Objective To describe the prevalence of anemia in children andadolescents in district ofMalinau, a rural area in East KalimantanProvince.Methods This cross-sectional study was done in June 20 10 usinglaboratory records between July 2009 to January 20 10. Laboratoryrecords of patients aged between 6 months and 18 years whichinvestigated were complete blood count (CBC) from ambulatory,inpatient, and emergency care ofMalinau Public Hospital in EastKalimantan. Mentzer and England & Fraser indices were used todifferentiate iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and thalassemia amongmicrocytic hypochromic anemic patients.Results This study involved 709 laboratory records. Prevalenceof anemia was 53 .9% (95% CI 50.2% to 57 .5%) . The prevalenceof IDA among age groups were as follows: 29.4% (95% CI 24.3to 34.5%) in 6- 59 months group, 16% (95% CI 11 to 21 %) in5- 11.9 years, and 15.2% (95% CI 10.2 to 20.2%) in 12- 18 years.Children aged 6- 59 months tended to have more anemia th anthose aged 5- 11.9 years (OR 2. 184, 95% CI 1.398 to 3.413) oraged 12- 18 years (OR 2.3 19, 95% CI 1.464 to 3.674).Conclusion T he prevalence of an emia in children andadolescents of the Malinau Regency is 53 .9% (95% CI 50.2 to57.5%), quite similar to that of other developing countries . Agovernment program to overcome anemia is recommended, n otonly for pregnant women, but also for children and adolescents.
Correlations between hemoglobin, serum ferritin, and soluble transferrin receptor levels in children aged 6-59 months Tri Kusumastuti, Fajar Diah; Sutaryo, Sutaryo; Mulatsih, Sri
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 54 No 2 (2014): March 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (150.787 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi54.2.2014.122-6

Abstract

Background Early detection of iron deficiency is important in young children to prevent iron deficiency anemia, which may cause permanent neurocognitive development disorders. Hemoglobin level is an insensitive tool for detecting iron deficiency without anemia, while serum ferritin levels may be influenced by infection and inflammation. However, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) is a sensitive marker for detecting iron deficiency, yet not widely used in daily practice.Objective To assess for correlations between hemoglobin, serum ferritin, and soluble transferrin receptor levels in children aged 6-59 months.Methods We performed a cross-sectional study in the Yogyakarta and Bantul Districts involving 85 children aged 6-59 months who visited integrated health posts (posyandu) and who met the inclusion criteria. Subjects were chosen by cluster random sampling. Blood specimens were collected to examine hemoglobin, serum ferritin, and sTfR levels.Results Spearman’s correlation test revealed weak negative correlations between hemoglobin and serum ferritin levels, as well as between hemoglobin and sTfR levels, with coefficient correlations of r = -0.220, (P=0.043) and r = -0.317, (P=0.003), respectively. There was no correlation between serum ferritin and sTfR levels (r = -0.033; P=0.767).Conclusion Hemoglobin levels has weak negative correlations with serum ferritin and sTfR, but serum ferritin does not correlate with sTfR. [Paediatr Indones. 2014;54:122-6.]
Nutritional status and physical activity of childhood leukemia survivors Tanjung, Conny; Lukito, Johannes Bondan; Meylani, Prima Dyarti
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 54 No 2 (2014): March 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (258.806 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi54.2.2014.67-72

Abstract

Background Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the mostcommon malignancy of childhood, has an overall cure rate ofapproximately 80%. Long-term survivors of childhood ALL areat increased risk for obesity and physical inactivity that may leadto the development of diabetes, dyslipidemia, metabolic syndrome,as well as cardiovascular dis eases, and related mortality in theyears following treatment.Objective To evaluate the physical activity and the propensityfor developing obesity longer term in ALL survivors.Methods This retrospective cohort study included all ALLsurvivors from Pantai Indah Kapuk (PIK) Hospital. We assessedtheir physical activity and nutritional status at the first time ofALL diagnosis an d at the time of interview.Results Subjects were 15 ALL survivors aged 7 to 24 years. Themedian fo llow up time was 6.4 years (range 3 to 10 years). Only2 out of 15 survivors were overweight and n one were obese.All survivors led a sedentary lifestyle. Most female subjectshad increased BMI, though most were not overweight/obese.Steroid therapy in the induction phase did not increase the riskof developing obesity in ALL survivors.Conclusion Lon g-term survivors of childh ood ALL do not meetphysical activity recommendations according to the CDC (Centersfor Disease Control). Howevei; steroid therapy do not seem tolead to overweight/obesity in ALL survivors.
Ketorolac vs. tramadol for pain management after abdominal surgery in children Hendarman, Iman; Triratna, Silvia; Kamaludin, Muhammad; Theodorus, Theodorus
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 54 No 2 (2014): March 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (100.895 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi54.2.2014.118-21

Abstract

Background Tramadol is a pure analgesic widely used forpostoperative treatment and well tolerated by children. Howevet;it has only a 50% efficacy. Ketorolac, a non????steroid anri????inflammation drug (NSAID), is widely used in adults and has upto 85% clinical efficacy. Data supporting the use of ketorolac inchildren has been limited.Objective To compare the clinical efficacies of intravenousketorolac and tramadol for moderate????to????severe pain managementafter abdominal surgery in children.Methods A double????blind controlled trial was conducted in Moh.Hoesin Hospital, Palembang, from January to June 2012. Subjectswere postoperative children aged 1 ???? 7 years who met the inclusioncriteria. T hey were randomized into two groups who receivedeither intravenous ketorolac or tramadol. Subjects assessedtheir pain level using the Face, Legs, Anns, Cry and Consolability(FLACC) pain scale. T he FLACC scores ::::;3 were considered toindicate clinical success of the intervention. Data were analyzedby T????test, Chi????square test, and Fischer's exact test.Results Of the 60 subjects who underwent abdominal surgery withgeneral anesthesia, 31 (52%) were boys and 29 (48%) were girls.Subjects' mean age and body weight were 3.7 (SD 1.82) years and12.6 (SD 2.85) kg, respectively. Mean duration of surgery was 71.7(SD 21.11) minutes and mean post????operative FLACC score was6.6 (SD 0.5). Eight subjects dropped out of the study. Efficacies ofketorolac and tramadol were not significantly different at 21/26 and17/26, respectively (P=OJ5). In addition, there was no significantdifference in the number of patients experiencing a >3 FLACCscore decline between ketorolac and tramadol groups (P=0.61).Conclusion T here is no significant difference in the efficaciesof intravenous ketorolac and tramadol for moderate????to????severepain management after abdominal surgery in children. [PaediatrIndones.2014;54:118.21.].
Correlation of renal volume to renal function and blood pressures in low birth weight children Larope, Ekawaty; Umboh, Adrian; Wilar, Rocky
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 54 No 2 (2014): March 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (137.959 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi54.2.2014.73-6

Abstract

Background Disruption of nephrogenesis in low birth weight(LBW) infant leads to decreases in nephron number andrenal volume, resulting in renal hyperfunction and eventually,hypertension.Objective To assess for a possible correlation of renal volume torenal function and blood pressures in low birth weight childrenaged 7 -8 years.Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study on childrenaged 7-8 years in Manado, who were born LBW or n ormalbirth weight (NBW). Renal function was assessed by measuringblood cyctatin-C level while renal volume was determined usingultrasound measurements of renal length x width x thickness(cm3). Ttest was used to compare renal volume and cystatin-Clevels in LBW children to NBW children. Pearson's correlationtest was used to assess the relationship of renal volume to renalfunction and blood pressure in low birth weight children.Results Subjects were 48 LBW and 48 NBW children. Meanrenal volumes were 7 8.28 (SD 7 .96) cm3 in the LBW group and103.68 (SD 12.52) cm3 in the NBW group (P< 0.01). The meancystatin-C levels, as a measure of renal function, were 0.81 (SD0.07) mg/Lin the LBW group and in 0.73 (SD 0.06) mg/Linthe NBW group (P< 0.01). There was no correlation betweenrenal volume and cystatin-C level (r=-0.169; P>0,05) as wellas between renal volume and systolic (r=-0.07, P>0.05) anddias tolic blood pressure (r=-0.123, P>0.05).Conclusion Mean renal volume is lower in the LBW groupthan in the NBW group, but is not correlated to decreased renalfunction or blood pressures.
Soluble transferrin receptor levels in obese and non obese adolescents Febrianti, Zul; Oenzil, Fadil; Arbi, Firman; Lubis, Gustina
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 54 No 2 (2014): March 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (151.902 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi54.2.2014.77-81

Abstract

Background Iron deficiency in children and adolescents maybe dueto an inadequate supply of iron as well as increased iron requirementsfor growth and developmental processes. The incr easing prevalence ofobesity puts children at risk of iron deficiency. Studies on the effectsof obesity on iron deficiency have focused on low grade systemicinflammation as well as examining soluble transferrin receptor levels(sTfR) as an indicator ofiron deficiency.Objective To compare sT fR levels in obese and non-obeseadolescents, assess for correlations between BMI, sTfR and obesity,and determine the risk of iron deficiency in obese adolescents .Method T his cross sectional study was conducted on 20 obeseand 20 non-obese adolescents aged 15-17 in East Aceh District,from September to December 20 11. Subject were chosen throughcluster sampling. The obese subjects had BMI > 95th percentileand the non-obese subjects had BMI s:851h percentile based onthe 2000 National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). Exclusioncriteria were blood disorders, chronic diseases, and a history ofbleeding. Data were analyzed by Chi-square test and T test witha significance level of P < 0.05, and Pearson's correlation.Results The mean s TfR levels in obese adolescents was higher thanin non-obese adolescents, [2.59 (SD 0.76) vs 2.14 (SD 0.45) μg/mL(P = 0.030)]. Iron deficiency (sTfR> 2.5 μgimL) was more commonin obese than in non-obese adolescents [ (55% vs . 15%, respectively,(P = 0.019) ]. Analysis of the relationship between obesity accordingto BMI andsTfRrevealedan OR of 6.93; 95% CI 1.53 to3 1.38. Ther elationship between the BMI and sTfR levels indicated a positive,moderate strength of association (r = 0.392) .Conclusion The mean sT fR levels in obese adolescents is significantlyhigher than in non-obese individuals. Obese adolescentshave a 6.93 times higher risk of iron deficiency than non-obeseadolescents. Body mass index has a positive and moderate associationwith sTfR.
Physical activity, eating patterns, and insulin resistance in obesity Huriyati, Erny; Nugroho, Perdana Samekto; Susilowaty, Rina; Julia, Madarina
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 54 No 2 (2014): March 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (114.187 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi54.2.2014.82-7

Abstract

Background Unhealthy eating patterns and physical inactivityare associated with obesity. Insulin resistance, an early sign of type2 diabetes mellitus, is common in obese individuals.Objective To assess for an association between physical activity andeating patterns to insulin resistance in obese female adolescents.Methods Subjects were 77 obese female adolescents aged 13-15years. Peripheral blood specimens were obtained for measurementsof fasting blood glucose, insulin, and the homeostatic modelassessment (HOMA) index. Subjects were considered to be in astate of insulin resistance for HOMA index 2::3. 16. Physical activityrecalls for 7 x 24h were performed to obtain information on subjects'energy expenditure, as well as intensity and duration of physicalactivity. Data on nutrients intake was also obtained using 7 x 24hfood recalls. Fat intake was categorized into saturated fatty acid(SAFA), unsaturated fatty acid (UNSAF A), monounsaturated fattyacid (MUFA), and polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA).Results Subjects spent most of their time on light activities, 23 .5(SD 2.0) hours/day. Those with insulin resistance spent slightly moretime doing light activities. Conversely, they spent less time in vigorousactivities, a mean difference of 4.96 (95%CI 0.61 to 9.31) minutes/day (P=o 0.01). Subjects who spent less than 1 minute/day in heavyactivities had higher odds for insulin resistance, (OR 3. 14; 95%CI1.20 to 8.50; P=o0.02). There were no relationships found betweennutrients intake, such as energy, protein, fats (SAFA, UNSAFA,MUFA, and PUFA), or carbohydrates, and insulin resistance.Conclusion In obese female adolescents, physical inactivityis associated with insulin resistance, while nutrients intakeis not associated with insulin resistance.
Caesarean delivery and risk of developing atopic diseases in children Tri Yuliantini, Anak Agung; Juffrie, Mohammad; Wati, Ketut Dewi Kumara
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 54 No 2 (2014): March 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (120.648 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi54.2.2014.94-100

Abstract

Background Caesarean delivery has been suggested to alterneonatal immune respon ses and increase the risk of atopicdiseases. Howevei; previous studies have reported inconsistentfindings.Objective To investigate a possible association between caesareandelivery and the development of atopic diseases in children.Methods This case-control study involved 100 children aged 3months-12 years, in Sanglah Hospital, Denpasai; Indonesia. Fiftyinfants and children with a confirmed diagnosis of atopic diseasesand 50 sex-paired controls (non-atopic infants and children)were enrolled. Demographic data was obtained, including modeof delivery and relevant history connected to atopic diseases.Skin prick test to four common aeroallergens was performed inall subjects. Possible confounding factors were considered in amultivariable logis tic regression model.Results Caesarean section was not significant as a risk factor foratopic diseases in a multivariate analysis [OR 2.4 (95%CI 0.7 to8.4; P=0.164)]. Howevei; multiple logistic regression analysisshowed that atopic diseases was significantly associated with apositive family history of atopy. Furthermore, caesarean sectionwas associated with a higher risk of atopic diseases in a subgroupanalysis for family history of atopy [OR= 4 (95%CI 1 to 16.2;P= 0.04)].Conclusion Children delivered by caesarean section and have afamily history of atopy have a 4-fo ld higher risk of atopic diseases.
Urinalysis as a diagnostic tool for febrile urinary tract infection in children aged 2 months - 2 years Khairina, Ayijati; Trihono, Partini Pudjiastuti; Munasir, Zakiudin
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 54 No 2 (2014): March 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (137.696 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi54.2.2014.100-8

Abstract

Background Children aged 2 months to 2 years with febrileurinary tract infection (UTI) need special attention consideringkidney complications, unspecified symptoms, and difficult urinesample collection. Urinalysis was the main supportive examinationfor UTI because of its immediate result and widespreadavailability.Objective To estimate urine nitrite, leukocyte esterase (LE),leucocyturia, bacteriuria, and their combinations as a diagnostictool for febrile UTI in children aged 2 months to 2 years.Methods This is a diagnostic study held in Cipto MangunkusumoHospital, Tangerang General Hospital, Fatmawati Hospital, andBudhi Asih Hospital, involving 7 5 children aged 2 months to 2years. Urine samples for urinalysis and urine culture were collectedusing urine collector in all subjects. Clinical pathologists whoperformed urine culture, did not know the results of urinalysis.Results By parallel test analyses, we found that the best diagnosticvalue was the combination of 3 tests (LE, leucocyturia, andbacteriuria). This combination test showed sensitivity, specificity,positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV),positive likelihood ratio (LR+), and negative likelihood ratio(LR-) of 69%, 95%, 85%, 88%, 13.1, and 0.3.Conclusion The combination test of LE, leucocyturia, andbacteriuria shows high specificity, NPV, and LR+ . Therefore, thenegative results of these 3 tests in combination can be used to ruleout UTI.

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