cover
Contact Name
-
Contact Email
-
Phone
-
Journal Mail Official
-
Editorial Address
-
Location
Kota semarang,
Jawa tengah
INDONESIA
Paediatrica Indonesiana
ISSN : 00309311     EISSN : 2338476X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
Paediatrica Indonesiana is a medical journal devoted to the health, in a broad sense, affecting fetuses, infants, children, and adolescents, belonged to the Indonesian Pediatric Society. Its publications are directed to pediatricians and other medical practitioners or researchers at all levels of health practice throughout the world.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 11 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 54 No 4 (2014): July 2014" : 11 Documents clear
Risk factors for neonatal mortality at Moewardi Hospital, Surakarta Hidayah, Dwi; Hafidh, Yulidar
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 54 No 4 (2014): July 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (93.804 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi54.4.2014.219-22

Abstract

Background Neonatal mortality remains a major concern indeveloping countries. Identifying potential risk factors is importantin order to decrease the neonatal mortality rate. In MoewardiHospital, Surakarta, the risk factors for neonatal mortality havenot been assessed.Objective To evaluate potential risk factors of n eonatalmortality.Methods We reviewed medical records of all neonates hospitalizedin the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) at Dr. MoewardiHospital from January to December 2011. Analyzed variables weresex, birth weight, gestational age, maternal age, place of delivery,mode of delivery, and sepsis. Data were analyzed by Chi square andbinary logistic regression with 95% confidence intervals (CI).Results Out of841 neonates, the mortality rate was 212 (25.2%).Univariate logistic regression revealed that the significant riskfactors for neonatal mortality were preterm (OR 4.41 ; 95%CI4.24 to 4.57; P=0.0001) , low bir th weight (OR 4.30; 95%CI4.13 to 4.47; P=0.0001), sepsis (OR 2.99; 95%CI 2.81 to 3.17;P=0.0001), maternal age 2:35 years (OR 1.53; 95%CI 1.37 to1.70), and non-spontaneous delivery (OR 1.67; 95%CI 1.50 to1.84). Further multivariate regression analysis revealed that thesignificant risk factors were preterm (OR 2.2 7; 95%CI 2.05 to 2.48;P=0.0001), low birth weight (OR 2.49; 95%CI 2.27 to 2.71; P=0.0001), and sepsis (OR 2.50; 95%CI 2.30 to 2.69; P= 0.0001).Conclusion The risk factors for neonatal mortality in the NICUare preterm, low birth weight, and sepsis.
Thyroid hormone profile and PELOD score in children with sepsis Tanurahardja, Agung G.; Pudjiadi, Antonius H.; Dwipoerwantoro, Pramita G.; Pulungan, Aman
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 54 No 4 (2014): July 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (100.884 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi54.4.2014.245-50

Abstract

Background Thyroid hormonal dysfunction, also known aseuthyroid sick syndrome or nonthyroidal illness, can be seenin sepsis. There have been few studies on thyroid hormonedysfunction in septic children, as well as on a relationshipbetween their thyroid hormone profiles and pediatric logisticorgan dysfunction (PELOD) scores. Procakitonin (PCT) is oneof the sepsis biomarker.Objective To evaluate the thyroid hormone profile in childrenwith sepsis as well as to assess for a correlation between the thyroidlevels and PELOD scores, PCT levels, and patient outcomes.Methods This cross-sectional study included children aged 1- 18years admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) with aprimary diagnosis of sepsis. PELOD scores and thyroid hormonallevels were assessed once during the first 24 hours after PICUadmission.Results Thirty subjects were included in the study. The medianvalues ofT3, free T4, and TSH were 45 (range 17 -133) ng/dL,0.81 (range 0.3-1.57) ng/dL, and 1.36 (range 0.05-7.78) μIU/L,respectively. The T3, free T4, and TSH levels were decreased in97%, 50% and 40% of the subjects. There were no significantdifferences between low and normal to high TSH with regards tothe PELOD score (P=0.218), PCT level (P=0.694), or patientoutcomes (P=0.55). The risk of death increased by 15 timesamong the subjects with PELOD score ~20 compared to thosewith PELOD score <20 (OR 15; 95%CI: 1.535 to 146.545;P=0.012).Conclusion Thyroid hormones are decreased in septic childrenwith the majority having low T3. A high PELOD score is stronglycorrelated with mortality and can be used as a prognostic parameterfor septic children in the PICU, but there is no correlation withdecreased TSH.
Reducing dyspeptic symptoms in children: proton pump inhibitor vs. H2 receptor antagonist Febriani, Tien Budi; Widowati, Titis; Juffrie, Mohammad
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 54 No 4 (2014): July 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (86.564 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi54.4.2014.198-201

Abstract

Background Dyspepsia is known as a leading cause of uppergastrointestinal tract morbidity. If left untreated, dyspepsia maybecome chronic. Dyspeptic symptoms manifest as epigastricpain, heartburn, nausea, hematemesis, or melena. Experimentalstudies have shown that omeprazole is more effective at reducingheartburn than ranitidine in adults. However, there have beenfew studies comparing the effects of proton pump inhibitorsto Hz receptor antagonists for reducing dyspeptic symptoms inchildren.Objective To compare the effect of omeprazole with ranitidinefor reducing dyspeptic symptoms .Methods We performed a double-blind randomized controlledtrial (RCT) at Sardjito Hospital and three community h ealthcenters in the Sleman District from June to November 2012.We recruited children aged 3-18 years with dyspepsia. Subjectswere allocated into two groups using block randomization:the proton pump inhibitor (omeprazole) and the Hz receptorantagonist (ranitidine) groups. According to the groups, eitheromeprazole (0.4-0 .8 mg/kg/dose) or ranitidine (2-4 mg/kg/dose) ,respectively, were taken twice daily for 5 days. Dyspepsia wasclinically diagnosed using the new Rome III criteria. Both groupswere monitored for 5 days to assess for a reduction of dyspepticsymptoms.Results Significantly more subjects in the omeprazole grouprecovered from dyspeptic symptoms than in the ranitidine group(RR= 4.87; 95%CI 1.5 to 15.3; P=0.005).Conclusion Omeprazole was 4.87 (95% CI 1.5 to 15.3) timesbetter than ranitidine in reducing dyspeptic symptoms on childrenaged 3-18 years with dyspepsia.
Utility of hemoglobin A1c to screen for impaired glucose tolerance Ginting, Edy K.; Aditiawati, Aditiawati; Irfanuddin, Irfanuddin
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 54 No 4 (2014): July 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (101.177 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi54.4.2014.223-6

Abstract

Background Childhood obesity is associated with an increasedlikelihood for having impaired glucose tolerance, dyslipidemia,and diabetes. Hemoglobin Ale (HbAl c) h as emerged as arecommended diagnostic tool for identifying diabetes and personsat risk for the disease. This recommendation was based on datain adults, showing the relationship between HbAl C and thefuture development of diabetes . However, studies in the pediatricpopulation have been limited and no stan dard values of HbAlclevels in children have been established.Objective To evaluate HbAlc as a test for impaired glucosetolerance in obese children and adolescents and to identify theoptimal HbAlc thresh old level (cut off poin t).Methods We studied 65 obese and 4 overweight children (BMI 2::+ 2 SD for age and gender) aged 10-15 years in Palembang. Allsubjects underwent HbAlc and oral glucose tolerance tests.Results Nineteen out of 69 subjects (28%) had impaired glucosetolerance. Based on the receiver operating characteristic curve,the optimal cut off point of HbAlc related to impaired glucosetolerance as diagnosed by oral glucose tolerance test was found tobe 5.25%, with 63% sensitivity and 64% specificity, 40% positivepredictive value, and 82% negative predictive value. The areaunder the receiver operating ch aracteristic curve was O .68 7(95%CI 0.541-0.833; P < 0.00 1).Conclusion A HbAlc cut off value of 5.25% may be used as ascreening tool to identify children and adolescents with impairedglucose tolerance.
Relationship between children’s and parents’ blood pressure Nasution, Desy Aswira; Rusdidjas, Rusdidjas; Supriatmo, Supriatmo; Ramayati, Rafita; Ramayani, Oke Rina; Siregar, Rosmayanti
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 54 No 4 (2014): July 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (87.017 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi54.4.2014.202-5

Abstract

Background A family history of hypertension is a risk factor forhypertension in children. Past studies have reported a significantrelationship between elevated blood pressure in children andhypertensive parents.Objective To assess for an association between blood pressure inchildren and that of their parents.Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in 90 childrenaged 6-18 years in Baringin Village, Panyabungan, from May toJune 2010. Subjects were collected by consecutive sampling.Classification of hypertension was based on Fourth Task ForceGuidelines by measuring blood pressure, height, and weight. Weused Student's T-test to analyze numerical data. Simple linearregression was used to investigate the relationship between bloodpressures of children and their parents.Results Of the 90 participants recruited, 24 boys and 17 girlshad hypertensive parents. The mean systolic (SBP) , diastolic(DBP) and arterial blood pressure (MABP) were significantlyhigher in children with hyperten sive parents than in childrenwith normotensive parents [ (SBP 116. 7 (SD 7 .07) vs. 87 .1 (SD13.57) mmHg; P=0.0001), (DBP 77.8 (SD 8.33) vs. 51.8 (SD11.70) mmHg; P=0.0001), (MABP 90.7 (SD 7.41) vs . 63 .6(12.10) mmHg; P=0.000 1] . There was a significant relationshipbetween elevated SBP in boys and their fathers, as indicated bythe correlation coefficient (r =0.806; P=0.0001).Conclusion The blood pressure is significantly higher in childrenwith hypertensive parents than in those with normotensiveparents. There is a correlation between SBP in boys and that oftheir fathers.
Correlation between gut pathogens and fecal calprotectin levels in young children with acute diarrhea Lam, Yanever Angela; Warouw, Sarah M.; Wahani, Audrey M.I.; Manoppo, Jeanette I.C.; Salendu, Praevilia Margareth
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 54 No 4 (2014): July 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (120.303 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi54.4.2014.193-7

Abstract

Background In cases of acute diarrhea, it is difficult to distinguishbetween bact erial and non-bacterial causes . Increased fecalcalprotectin (f-CP) level is a marker of neutrophil migration in theintestinal lumen and is associated with intes tinal inflammation.Previous studies reported an increase in f-CP levels in childrenwith acute diarrhea, which is caused by bacteria, but only fewhave studied the relationship between intestinal pathogens withf-CP levels in acute diarrhea.Objective To assess for a correlation between gut pathogens andfecal calprotectin levels in children with acute diarrhea.Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study between Julyto November 2012 on children aged 1-5 ye ars with acutediarrhea, and underwent routine blood tests, stool microscopy,f-CP tests, and stool cultures. We used a simple linear regressionand correlation analysis with a significance level of P< 0.05.Results Forty-two children enrolled in this study. The mean age ofsubjects was 2.27 (SD 134) years. Theirmeanf-CP level was 93.88(SD 14.68) μg/g. On microscopic stool examination, 26 patients( 61.9%) had positive leukocytes, 1 had Ancy lo stoma duodenale, 1had Ascaris lumbricoides, and 2 had Blastocystis hominis. Positivestool cultures were found in 14 children (33.3%) with acutediarrhea. There was a significant positive correlation between gutpathogens and f-CP levels (r=0.605; P< 0.0001).Conclusion In young children with acute diarrhea, the averagef-CP levels are higher in those with positive intestinal pathogens.
Ursodeoxycholic acid in neonatal sepsis-associated cholestasis Rina, Rita Mey; Oswari, Hanifah; Amalia, Pustika
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 54 No 4 (2014): July 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (114.829 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi54.4.2014.206-12

Abstract

Background Sepsis-associated cholestasis (SAC) is an intrahepatic cholestasis caused by inflammatory cytokines. Patients with this condition have poor prognoses. Antibiotics are the mainstay of therapy, however, other adjuvant therapies, such as ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), have not been well established.Objective To assess the effect ofUDCA for treatment ofneonatal sepsis-associated cholestasis.Methods We performed a randomized, double-blind, controlled trial in 3 7 neonates who were diagnosed with sepsis-associated cholestasis in the Neonatal Care Unit of Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital. Subjects were divided into two groups, with 19 neonates randomly allocated to the intervention group (received UDCA at 30 tngikg/day divided into 3 doses for 7 days) and 18 neonates to the control group (received placebo) . After 7 days of treatment, we evaluated the subjects' liver function parameters and performed asurvival analysis.Results Liver function parameter improvements at day 7 were not significantly different between the UDCA group and the control group, including for mean decrease of total bilirubin (TB) levels [2.2 (SD 2.9) mg/dL vs 1.7 (SD 4.6) mg/dL; P=0.080), mean decrease of direct bilirubin (DB) levels [1.1 (SD 2.3) mg/dL vs 0.6 (SD 3.6) mg/dL; P=0.080), median indirect bilirubin (lB) levels [0.4 (range 0.1- 5.6) mg/dL vs 0.9 (range 0.1-4.1) mg/dL; P=0.358) , mean decrease of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels [0.5 (-80.0 -21.0) U/L vs -2.0 (ranged -167 .0 - 85.0) U/L; P= 0.730), median aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels [ 43 .0 (range 14.0-297 .0) U/L vs 150.0 (range 24.0-840.0) U/L; P=0.081), and median gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGf) levels [125.0 (48.0-481.0) U/L vs 235.0 (56.0-456.0) U/L; P=0.108)). Five neonates in control group died compared to two in the UDCA group (P=0.232). In addition, UDCA did not significantly lengthen the survival time (hazard ratio/HR 3.62; 95%CI 0.69 to 18.77) .Conclusion Ursodeoxycholic acid tends to improve total bilirubin, direct bilirubin, and AST levels in sepsis associated cholestasis .
Serum nitric oxide and pediatric sepsis outcomes Chandra, Ronald; Mandei, Jose M.; Manoppo, Jeanette I. Ch.; Wilar, Rocky; Runtunuwu, Ari L.; Liana, Phey
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 54 No 4 (2014): July 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (111.69 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi54.4.2014.213-8

Abstract

Background Sepsis is the complex pathophysiologic responsesof the host against systemic infection. Sepsis can cause severeconditions such as septic shock and multiple organ failure.Although we have a better understanding of the molecular basisof sepsis as well as aggressive therapy, the mortality rate remainshigh, between 20-80%. Nitric oxide (NO) is one of the mediatorsassociated with cardiovascular failure, apoptosis and organdysfunction in sepsis.Objective To evaluate for a possible correlation between NOlevels and outcomes in pediatric sepsis.Methods A prospective cohort study was conducted at thepediatric intensive care unit (PICU) of Prof. Dr. R.D. KandouGeneral Hospital in Manado, from June to November 2012. Fortychildren aged one month to five year old, fulfilled the InternationalPediatrics Sepsis Consensus Conference 2 005 criteria were recruited.Nitrite oxide metabolites (nitrite and nitrate) levels were measuredusing a calorimetric assay kit (Cayman®, Catalog No.780001)from venous blood specimens collected at admission. All patientsreceived antibiotics empirically within an hour of the diagnosis.Outcomes of patients recorded were survivor or died, and lengthof stay in PICU.Results Mann-Whitney U test revealed a significant differencebetween median serum NO levels ins urvivors and those who died(18.60 vs. 36.50 fLM/L, respectively; P= 0.016).Conclusion Serum NO concentration is higher in those whodied than in survivors of pediatric sepsis. Specific NO inhibitionmay be beneficial in decreasing morbidity and mortality in thiscondition.
Activation of coagulation system and d-dimer levels in children with acute leukemia Wijaya, Harun; Chozie, Novie Amelia; Hegar, Badriul
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 54 No 4 (2014): July 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (96.6 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi54.4.2014.227-31

Abstract

Background D-dimer is a molecule as result of breaking downof excessive fibrin formation from the activation of coagulationsystem. There is evidence of increased activation of coagulation inpatients with acute leukemia which was showed by the incrementof d-dimer levels.Objective To evaluate the incidence of activation of coagulationsys tem in children with acute leukemia before receivingchemotherapy.Method This cross-sectional study was performed at Dr. CiptoMangunkusumo Hospital. All newly-diagnosed children with acuteleukemia were included in this study, prior to their receiving anychemotherapy treatment. Blast count, prothrombin time (PTI),activated partial thromboplastin time (APTf), and D-dimer levelswere examined after the diagnosis was confirmed by morphology andimmunophenotyping studies on bone marrow specimens.Results Out of 22 subjects, 13 subjects had increased D-dimervalues. The median D-dimer level of this elevated group was 1,000(range 500-14, 700) n gfmL. In the acute myeloblastic leukemia(AML) patients, activation of coagulation was found in 7 out of 8subjects. The median D-dimer levels was 950 (range 100-14, 700)ng/mL. In the acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) patients, 6 outof 14 subjects had increased activation of coagulation with medianD-dimer level of 300 (range 100-3,800) ngfmL. Nine out of 10subjects with blast cells on peripheral blood smear had a medianD-dimer level of 1,000 (range 500-3,800) ng/mL. Both PT andAPTT were found normal in all subjects.Conclusion Activation of coagulation sys tem occurs at thetime of diagnosis as shown by increased D-dimer levels. Thecharacteristics of activation of coagulation system are differentbetween ALL and AML subjects, as well as between subj ects withpositive and negative blast counts on peripheral blood smears.Despite the increased activation of coagulation, PT and APTfremain normal.
Lipid profiles in smoking and non-smoking male adolescents Prastyanto, Sigit; Sitaresmi, Mei Neni; Julia, Madarina
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 54 No 4 (2014): July 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (92.355 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi54.4.2014.232-5

Abstract

Background The prevalence of smoking in adolescentstends to increase. Smoking is associated with a higher risk ofdyslipidemia.Objective To compare the lipid profiles of tobacco-smoking andnon-tobacco-smoking male adolescents.Methods We performed a cross- sectional study in three vocationalhigh schools in Yogyakarta from January to April 2011. Dataon smoking status, duration of smoking and number cigarettesconsumed per day were collected by questionnaires. We randomlyselected 50 male smokers and 50 male non-smokers as the studysubjects.Results Mean differences between smokers and non-smokerswere 44.5 (95%CI 28. 7 to 60.1) mg/dL for triglyceride levels; 8.0(95% CI 1.0 to 14.9) mg/dL for low density lipoprotein (LDL)cholesterol; 11.8 (1.1 to 22.4) mg/dL for total cholesterol and -5.7mg/dL (95% CI -8.8 to -2.6) for high density lipoprotein (HDL)cholesterol. Mean differences (95% CI) between smokers whohad engaged in smoking for > 2 years and those who had smokedfor :S:2 years were -18.1 (95% CI -33 .9 to -2.3) mg/dL for totalcholesterol; -49.4 (95% CI -67.2 to -3 1.5) mg/dL for triglycerides.Mean differences between those who smoked > 5 cigarettes/dayand :s:5 cigarettes per day were -18 .4 (95% CI -32.8 to -4.1) mg/dL for total cholesterol and -29.1 (95% CI -53.6 to -4.6) mg/dLfor triglycerides.Conclusion Smoking more than 5 cigarettes/day significantlyincreases total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglyceridelevels, as well as reduces HDL cholesterol levels; while smokingmore than 2 years significantly increases total cholesterol andtriglyceride levels

Page 1 of 2 | Total Record : 11


Filter by Year

2014 2014


Filter By Issues
All Issue Vol 60 No 3 (2020): May 2020 Vol 60 No 2 (2020): March 2020 Vol 60 No 1 (2020): January 2020 Vol 59 No 6 (2019): November 2019 Vol 59 No 5 (2019): September 2019 Vol 59 No 4 (2019): July 2019 Vol 59 No 3 (2019): May 2019 Vol 59 No 2 (2019): March 2019 Vol 59 No 1 (2019): January 2019 Vol 59 No 3 (2019): May 2019 Vol 59 No 2 (2019): March 2019 Vol 58 No 6 (2018): November 2018 Vol 58 No 5 (2018): September 2018 Vol 58 No 4 (2018): July 2018 Vol 58 No 3 (2018): May 2018 Vol 58 No 2 (2018): March 2018 Vol 58 No 1 (2018): January 2018 Vol 57 No 6 (2017): November 2017 Vol 57 No 5 (2017): September 2017 Vol 57 No 4 (2017): July 2017 Vol 57 No 3 (2017): May 2017 Vol 57 No 2 (2017): March 2017 Vol 57 No 1 (2017): January 2017 Vol 56 No 6 (2016): November 2016 Vol 56 No 5 (2016): September 2016 Vol 56 No 4 (2016): July 2016 Vol 56 No 3 (2016): May 2016 Vol 56 No 2 (2016): March 2016 Vol 56 No 1 (2016): January 2016 Vol 55 No 1 (2015): January 2015 Vol 55 No 6 (2015): November 2015 Vol 55 No 5 (2015): September 2015 Vol 55 No 4 (2015): July 2015 Vol 55 No 3 (2015): May 2015 Vol 55 No 2 (2015): March 2015 Vol 55 No 1 (2015): January 2015 Vol 54 No 6 (2014): November 2014 Vol 54 No 5 (2014): September 2014 Vol 54, No 6 (2014): November 2014 Vol 54, No 5 (2014): September 2014 Vol 54 No 6 (2014): November 2014 Vol 54 No 5 (2014): September 2014 Vol 54 No 4 (2014): July 2014 Vol 54 No 3 (2014): May 2014 Vol 54 No 2 (2014): March 2014 Vol 54 No 1 (2014): January 2014 Vol 53 No 6 (2013): November 2013 Vol 53 No 5 (2013): September 2013 Vol 53 No 4 (2013): July 2013 Vol 53 No 3 (2013): May 2013 Vol 53 No 2 (2013): March 2013 Vol 53 No 1 (2013): January 2013 Vol 52 No 6 (2012): November 2012 Vol 52 No 5 (2012): September 2012 Vol 52 No 4 (2012): July 2012 Vol 52 No 3 (2012): May 2012 Vol 52 No 2 (2012): March 2012 Vol 52 No 1 (2012): January 2012 Vol 51 No 6 (2011): November 2011 Vol 51 No 5 (2011): September 2011 Vol 51 No 4 (2011): July 2011 Vol 51 No 3 (2011): May 2011 Vol 51 No 2 (2011): March 2011 Vol 51 No 1 (2011): January 2011 Vol 50 No 5 (2010): September 2010 Vol 50 No 4 (2010): July 2010 Vol 50 No 2 (2010): March 2010 Vol 50 No 1 (2010): January 2010 Vol 50, No 5 (2010): September 2010 Vol 50, No 4 (2010): July 2010 Vol 50, No 2 (2010): March 2010 Vol 50 No 6 (2010): November 2010 Vol 50 No 5 (2010): September 2010 Vol 50 No 3 (2010): May 2010 Vol 50 No 2 (2010): March 2010 Vol 50 No 1 (2010): January 2010 Vol 49 No 6 (2009): November 2009 Vol 49 No 5 (2009): September 2009 Vol 49 No 4 (2009): July 2009 Vol 49 No 3 (2009): May 2009 Vol 49 No 2 (2009): March 2009 Vol 49 No 1 (2009): January 2009 Vol 48 No 6 (2008): November 2008 Vol 48 No 5 (2008): September 2008 Vol 48 No 4 (2008): July 2008 Vol 48 No 3 (2008): May 2008 Vol 48 No 2 (2008): March 2008 Vol 48 No 1 (2008): January 2008 Vol 47 No 6 (2007): November 2007 Vol 47 No 5 (2007): September 2007 Vol 47 No 4 (2007): July 2007 Vol 47 No 3 (2007): May 2007 Vol 47 No 2 (2007): March 2007 Vol 47 No 1 (2007): January 2007 Vol 46 No 6 (2006): November 2006 Vol 46 No 5 (2006): September 2006 Vol 46 No 4 (2006): July 2006 Vol 46 No 3 (2006): May 2006 Vol 46 No 2 (2006): March 2006 Vol 46 No 1 (2006): January 2006 Vol 45 No 6 (2005): November 2005 Vol 45 No 5 (2005): September 2005 Vol 45 No 4 (2005): July 2005 Vol 45 No 3 (2005): May 2005 Vol 45 No 2 (2005): March 2005 Vol 45 No 1 (2005): January 2005 Vol 44 No 6 (2004): November 2004 Vol 44 No 5 (2004): September 2004 Vol 44 No 4 (2004): July 2004 Vol 44 No 3 (2004): May 2004 Vol 44 No 2 (2004): March 2004 Vol 44 No 1 (2004): January 2004 Vol 43 No 6 (2003): November 2003 Vol 43 No 5 (2003): September 2003 Vol 43 No 4 (2003): July 2003 Vol 43 No 3 (2003): May 2003 Vol 43 No 2 (2003): March 2003 Vol 43 No 1 (2003): January 2003 Vol 42 No 9-10 (2002): September 2002 Vol 42 No 5-6 (2002): May 2002 Vol 42 No 11-12 (2002): November 2002 Vol 42, No 6 (2002): November 2002 Vol 42, No 5 (2002): September 2002 Vol 41 No 9-10 (2001): September 2001 Vol 41 No 7-8 (2001): July 2001 Vol 41 No 5-6 (2001): May 2001 Vol 41 No 3-4 (2001): March 2001 Vol 41 No 11-12 (2001): November 2001 Vol 41, No 6 (2001): November 2001 Vol 41, No 5 (2001): September 2001 Vol 41, No 4 (2001): July 2001 Vol 41, No 3 (2001): May 2001 Vol 41, No 2 (2001): March 2001 Vol 41 No 1-2 (2001): January 2001 Vol 39 No 9-10 (1999): September 1999 Vol 39 No 7-8 (1999): July 1999 Vol 39 No 5-6 (1999): May 1999 Vol 39 No 3-4 (1999): March 1999 Vol 39 No 11-12 (1999): November 1999 Vol 39 No 1-2 (1999): January 1999 Vol 39, No 3-4 (1999): March 1999 Vol 39, No 1-2 (1999): January 1999 Vol 38 No 9-10 (1998): September 1998 Vol 38 No 3-4 (1998): March 1998 Vol 38 No 11-12 (1998): November 1998 Vol 38 No 1-2 (1998): January 1998 Vol 37 No 9-10 (1997): September-October 1997 Vol 37 No 5-6 (1997): May-June 1997 Vol 37 No 3-4 (1997): March-April 1997 Vol 37 No 1-2 (1997): January-February 1997 Vol 37, No 9-10 (1997): September-October 1997 Vol 37, No 5-6 (1997): May-June 1997 Vol 37, No 3-4 (1997): March-April 1997 Vol 37, No 1-2 (1997): January-February 1997 Vol 36 No 7-8 (1996): July-August 1996 Vol 36 No 5-6 (1996): May-June 1996 Vol 36 No 11-12 (1996): November-December 1996 Vol 36, No 7-8 (1996): July-August 1996 Vol 36, No 5-6 (1996): May-June 1996 Vol 36, No 11-12 (1996): November-December 1996 Vol 35 No 1-2 (1995): January 1995 Vol 35 No 9-10 (1995): September 1995 Vol 35 No 7-8 (1995): July 1995 Vol 35 No 5-6 (1995): May 1995 Vol 35 No 3-4 (1995): March 1995 Vol 34 No 7-8 (1994): July 1994 Vol 34 No 5-6 (1994): May 1994 Vol 34 No 3-4 (1994): March 1994 Vol 34 No 1-2 (1994): January 1994 Vol 33 No 7-8 (1993): July 1993 Vol 33 No 5-6 (1993): May 1993 Vol 33 No 3-4 (1993): March 1993 Vol 33 No 1-2 (1993): January 1993 Vol 32 No 7-8 (1992): July 1992 Vol 32 No 5-6 (1992): May 1992 Vol 32 No 3-4 (1992): March 1992 Vol 32 No 11-12 (1992): November 1992 Vol 31 No 5-6 (1991): May 1991 Vol 31 No 3-4 (1991): March 1991 Vol 31 No 11-12 (1991): November 1991 Vol 31, No 11-12 (1991): November 1991 Vol 31 No 9-10 (1991): September 1991 Vol 31 No 7-8 (1991): July 1991 Vol 31 No 5-6 (1991): May 1991 Vol 30 No 11-12 (1990): November 1990 Vol 29 No 3-4 (1989): March 1989 Vol 29 No 1-2 (1989): January 1989 Vol 29, No 9-10 (1989): September 1989 Vol 29, No 5-6 (1989): May 1989 Vol 29, No 1-2 (1989): January 1989 Vol 29 No 9-10 (1989): September 1989 Vol 29 No 7-8 (1989): July 1989 Vol 29 No 5-6 (1989): May 1989 Vol 29 No 3-4 (1989): March 1989 Vol 29 No 11-12 (1989): November 1989 Vol 28 No 9-10 (1988): September 1988 Vol 28 No 7-8 (1988): July 1988 Vol 28 No 3-4 (1988): March 1988 Vol 28 No 11-12 (1988): November 1988 Vol 28 No 5-6 (1988): May 1988 Vol 28 No 1-2 (1988): January 1988 Vol 26 No 4 (1986): July 1986 Vol 25 No 5-6 (1985): May 1985 Vol 24 No 7-8 (1984): July 1984 Vol 24 No 1-2 (1984): January 1984 Vol 24 No 9-10 (1984): September 1984 Vol 24 No 7-8 (1984): July 1984 Vol 24 No 5-6 (1984): May 1984 Vol 24 No 3-4 (1984): March 1984 Vol 24 No 11-12 (1984): November 1984 Vol 24 No 1-2 (1984): January 1984 Vol 22 No 9-10 (1982): September 1982 Vol 22 No 7-8 (1982): July 1982 Vol 22 No 5-6 (1982): May 1982 Vol 22 No 3-4 (1982): March 1982 Vol 22 No 11-12 (1982): November 1982 Vol 22 No 1-2 (1982): January 1982 Vol 22, No 9-10 (1982): September 1982 Vol 22, No 7-8 (1982): July 1982 Vol 22, No 5-6 (1982): May 1982 Vol 22, No 3-4 (1982): March 1982 Vol 22, No 11-12 (1982): November 1982 Vol 22, No 1-2 (1982): January 1982 Vol 21 No 9-10 (1981): September 1981 Vol 21 No 7-8 (1981): July 1981 Vol 21 No 5-6 (1981): May 1981 Vol 21 No 3-4 (1981): March 1981 Vol 21 No 11-12 (1981): November 1981 Vol 21 No 1-2 (1981): January 1981 Vol 21, No 9-10 (1981): September 1981 Vol 21, No 7-8 (1981): July 1981 Vol 21, No 5-6 (1981): May 1981 Vol 21, No 3-4 (1981): March 1981 Vol 21, No 11-12 (1981): November 1981 Vol 21, No 1-2 (1981): January 1981 Vol 20 No 3-4 (1980): March 1980 Vol 19 No 9-10 (1979): September 1979 Vol 19 No 3-4 (1979): March 1979 Vol 19 No 11-12 (1979): November 1979 Vol 19 No 1-2 (1979): January 1979 Vol 18 No 9-10 (1978): September 1978 Vol 18 No 5-6 (1978): May 1978 Vol 18 No 3-4 (1978): March 1978 Vol 18 No 11-12 (1978): November 1978 Vol 18 No 1-2 (1978): January 1978 Vol 16 No 9-10 (1976): September 1976 Vol 16 No 3-4 (1976): March 1976 Vol 16 No 1-2 (1976): January 1976 Vol 15 No 9-10 (1975): September 1975 Vol 15 No 7-8 (1975): July 1975 Vol 15 No 3-4 (1975): March 1975 Vol 15 No 11-12 (1975): November 1975 Vol 15 No 1-2 (1975): January 1975 Vol 14 No 9-10 (1974): September 1974 Vol 14 No 7-8 (1974): July 1974 Vol 14 No 5-6 (1974): May 1974 Vol 14 No 3-4 (1974): March 1974 Vol 14 No 11-12 (1974): November 1974 Vol 14 No 1-2 (1974): January 1974 Vol 13 No 4 (1973): April 1973 Vol 13 No 3 (1973): March 1973 Vol 13 No 2 (1973): February 1973 Vol 13 No 1 (1973): January 1973 Vol 13, No 4 (1973): April 1973 Vol 13, No 3 (1973): March 1973 Vol 13, No 2 (1973): February 1973 Vol 13, No 1 (1973): January 1973 More Issue