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Paediatrica Indonesiana
ISSN : 00309311     EISSN : 2338476X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
Paediatrica Indonesiana is a medical journal devoted to the health, in a broad sense, affecting fetuses, infants, children, and adolescents, belonged to the Indonesian Pediatric Society. Its publications are directed to pediatricians and other medical practitioners or researchers at all levels of health practice throughout the world.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 5 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 54, No 6 (2014): November 2014" : 5 Documents clear
Behavioral problems in children with epilepsy Novriska, Dora; Sutomo, Retno; Setyati, Amalia
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 54, No 6 (2014): November 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi54.6.2014.324-9

Abstract

Background Epilepsy is a neurological disorder that most oftenaffects children. Most cases of epilepsy are found in developingcountries. Children with epilepsy are at risk of behavioral disordersthat can affect their quality of life. Studies on behavioral problemsin children with epilepsy have been limited in Indonesia.Objective To compare behavioral disorders in children withepilepsy to those in normal children, and to assess for possiblefactors associated with the occurrence of behavioral disorders.Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study involving 47children with epilepsy and 46 children without epilepsy, aged 3-16years. Behavioral problems were screened with the Strength andDifficulty Questionnaire (SDQ), Indonesian version. Informationabout EEG description, medication, onset, and duration of epilepsywere obtained from medical records.Results Behavioral problems were found in 19.1% of childrenwith epilepsy and only in 2.2 % of children without epilepsy (PR8.8; 95%CI 1.16 to 66.77; P= 0.015). Significant differences werealso found in the percentage of conduct problems and emotionaldisorders. Multivariate analysis with logistic regression revealedthat the factors associated with behavioral disorders in childrenwith epilepsy were uncontrolled epilepsy (PR 13.9; 95%CI 1.45 to132.4; P=0.023) and focal EEG appearance (PR 19; 95%CI 1.71to 214.43; P=0.017). We also found that uncontrolled epilepsywas a factor related to emotional (PR 6.7; 95%CI 1.66 to 26.76;P=0.007) and conduct problems (PR 6.1; 95%CI 1.35 to 27.29;P=0.019).Conclusion Uncontrolled epilepsy and focal EEG results arefactors associated with increased risk of behavioral problems inchildren with epilepsy. Children with epilepsy should undergobehavioral disorder screening, followed by diagnosis confirmationand treatment.
Risk factors of childhood leukemia Bangun, Paulina K.; Lubis, Bidasari; Sofyani, Sri; Rosdiana, Nelly; Siregar, Olga R.
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 54, No 6 (2014): November 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi54.6.2014.358-64

Abstract

Background The incidence of childhood leukemia has increasedannually. Recent studies have shown that childhood leukemia isinitiated in utero, and have focused on prenatal risk factors suchas birth weight and parental age. Exposure to pesticides andradiation, as well as parental smoking, breastfeeding, and thenumber of older siblings have also been sugges ted as risk factorsfor childhood leukemia.Objective To evaluate possible risk factors for childhood leukemia,including birth weight, parental age, and other risk factors.Methods This case-con trol study was conducted from October2011 to February 2012 in Haji Adam Malik Hospital, Medan .Case subjects were children aged below 18 years and diagnosedwith leukemia. Control subjects were children aged below 18years who were diagnosed with any non-cancerous acute illnessesin this hospital, and individually matched for age and gen der tothe case subject group. Patients and parents were asked to fill astructured questionnaire. Data was analyzed using conditionallogistic regression .Results A total of 140 subjects were eligible, with 70 subjects ineach group. Birth weight 2: 4000 g and maternal age 2:35 yearswere significant risk factors with OR 10.13 (95%CI 1.124 to 91.2 7)and OR 4.98 (95%CI 1.276 to 19.445), respectively. Paternal ageof 2:35 years was not a significant risk factor. Exposure to pesticideswas also noted as another significant risk factor (OR= 6.66; 95%CI2.021 to 21.966) .Conclusion High birth weight, advan ced maternal age, andexposure to pesticides are risk factors of childhood leukemia.
Using family atopy scores to identify the risk of atopic dermatitis in infants Anggraeni, Melisa; Wati, Ketut Dewi Kumara; Tangking, Ketut
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 54, No 6 (2014): November 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi54.6.2014.330-7

Abstract

Background Atopic dermatitis is the first manifestation ofallergic disease in early life. Early interventions may prevent thedevelopment of allergy disease. Allergy trace cards have beenused to identify the level of allergic risk, based on family atopyscores. Because environmental factors may also influence thedevelopment of atopic dermatitis, the usefulness of the allergytrace card needs to be reevaluated.Objective To compare the incidence of atopic dermatitis ininfants aged 0-4 months with total family atopy scores of > 0 tothose with scores of 0.Methods We conducted this cohort study from June 1, 2012 toDecember 31, 2012 at Sanglah Hospital, Denpasar. Family atopyscore was tabulated from all pregnant woman in the ObstetricOutpatient Clinic and the Maternity Room. Subjects were dividedinto two groups based on their total family atopy score: those withscores > 0 and those with scores of 0. The appearance of atopicdermatitis symptoms in the infants were evaluated until theyreached 4 months of age. The incidence of atopic dermatitis intwo groups was compared using Chi-square test.Results The incidence of atopic dermatitis in this study was 10.9%.The group with total family atopy scores of 0 had a significantlyhigher incidence of atopic dermatitis than the group with scores> 0 (adjusted RR 22.5; 95%CI 8.8 to 57.0; P = 0.001).Conclusion The incidence of atopic dermatitis is higher ininfants with total family atopy score > 0 and this group has a 22.5times higher risk of atopic dermatitis compared to infants withtotal family atopy score of 0. Allergy trace cards are relevant indifferentiating the risk of atopy with regards to development ofatopic dermatitis. We suggest that family atopy scores be evaluatedduring antenatal care in order to limit the development of atopicdermatitis in infants.
Efficacy of aminophylline vs. caffeine for preventing apnea of prematurity Hendy, Hendy; Wandita, Setya; Kardana, I Made
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 54, No 6 (2014): November 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi54.6.2014.365-71

Abstract

Background Apnea of prematurity (AOP) usually occursin neonates with a gestational age < 34 weeks. The WorldHealth Organization has recommended the administration ofcaffeine or aminophylline to prevent AOP, but the efficacy ofaminophylline remains unclear, and caffeine citrate is not availablein Indonesia.Objective To compare the efficacy of aminophylline to that ofcaffeine for preventing AOP.Methods This single-blind, clinical trial was conducted onneonates (gestational age 28-34 weeks) who were able to breathespontaneously within the first 24 hours of life and admitted toSanglah Hospital from December 2012 to April 2013. Subjectswere randomly allocated into two groups, namely groups ofaminophyllin and caffeine. The aminophylline group receivedaminophylline dihydrate at an initial dose of 10 mg/kg body weight,then continued with a maintenance dose of 2.5 mg/kg body weightevery 12 hours. The caffeine group received anhydrous caffeineat an initial dose of 10 mg/kg body weight, then continued witha maintenance dose of 1.25 mg/kg body weight every 12 hours.We followed subjects up until they were 10 days old. Subjectsreceived per oral therapy for seven days. The efficacy comparisonbetween the two groups was assessed by Chi-square test with 95%confidence interval (CI) and a statistical significance value of P< 0.05. We used multivariate test to analyze the confoundingfactors.Results Ninety-six subjects participated in this study; 48 subjectsreceived aminophylline therapy and the other 48 subjects receivedcaffeine therapy. Twenty-eight subjects experienced apnea: 13subjects from the aminophylline group (27.1%), and 15 subjectsfrom the caffeine group (31.3%). It appeared that aminophyllinewas slightly better compared to caffeine, but the difference wasnot statistically significant, with a relative risk of 0.9 (95% CI0.5 to 1.3; P=0.8). We found vomiting to be a side effect of boththerapies, and not significantly different between groups. SepsisFrom the Department of Child Health, Udayana University MedicalSchool/Sanglah Hospital, Denpasar1 and Gadjah Mada University MedicalSchool/Sardjito Hospital, Yogyakarta2.Reprint requests to: Hendy, Department of Child Health, UdayanaUniversity Medical School, Sanglah Hospital, Jl. Pulau Nias, Denpasar,Bali 80114. Tel./Fax: +62-361-244038. E-mail: hendyhalim.md@gmail.com.Infant prematurity is defined as a gestationalage of < 37 weeks. Africa has the highest birthrate of premature infants of 11.9%, while thatof Southeast Asia is approximately 11.1%.1The main issue that premature infants face is apnea.Apnea is caused by incomplete development ofthe respiratory center, and is known as apnea ofprematurity (AOP). Several factors underlie thenecessity of AOP prevention: an 85% incidence ofAOP in infants with gestational age <34 weeks,2difficulty in diagnosing AOP, unpredictable onset,short- and long-term effects, long treatment lengthand requirement of intensive care. The World Healthand hyaline membrane disease were found to be confoundingfactors in this study.Conclusion Aminophylline and caffeine have similar efficacywith regards to preventing AOP.
Oral contraceptive use and conotruncal congenital heart disease Abdullah, Mars Nashrah; Ali, Muhammad; Deliana, Melda; Tobing, Tina Christina L.
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 54, No 6 (2014): November 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi54.6.2014.309-13

Abstract

Background Congenital heart disease (CHD) represents some of the more prevalent malformations among live births andremains the leading cause of death from congenital malformations.Conotruncal anomalies comprise a diverse group of CHDinvolving the outflow tracts of the heart and the great vessels.Oral contraceptive exposure before pregnancy may be one of therisk factors for conotruncal CHD.Objective To evaluate the effect of oral contraceptive use beforepregnancy on the risk of conotruncal CHD in children.Methods A case-control study was conducted from July 2010until July 2011 in Haji Adam Malik Hospital, Medan. Subjectswith CHD were divided into two groups: conotruncal CHD asthe case group and non-conotruncal CHD as the control group.Both groups had mothers with and without histories of oralcontraceptive use before pregnancy. Parents were interviewedusing questionnaires. Statistical analyses were performed usingChi-square test, student’s T-test, and Mann Whitney test.Results A total of 80 subjects were eligible, with 40 subjects ineach group. The percentages of subjects whose mothers used oralcontraceptives were 62% of the conotruncal CHD group and60% of the non-conotruncal CHD group (OR 0.82; 95%CI 0.33to 1.98). The mean duration of maternal oral contraceptive usebefore pregnancy was 19.1 months for the case group and 18.8months for the control group (P=0.87).Conclusion In children with CHD, maternal oral contraceptiveuse before pregnancy does not appear to increase the risk ofconotruncal CHD.

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