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Paediatrica Indonesiana
ISSN : 00309311     EISSN : 2338476X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
Paediatrica Indonesiana is a medical journal devoted to the health, in a broad sense, affecting fetuses, infants, children, and adolescents, belonged to the Indonesian Pediatric Society. Its publications are directed to pediatricians and other medical practitioners or researchers at all levels of health practice throughout the world.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 11 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 55 No 3 (2015): May 2015" : 11 Documents clear
Nutritional status of soil-transmitted helminthiasis-infected and uninfected children Simarmata, Nelly; Sembiring, Tiangsa; Ali, Muhammad
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 55 No 3 (2015): May 2015
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (261.991 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi55.3.2015.136-41

Abstract

Background Soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections remain a public health problem in developing countries. Their prevalence is particularly high in rural areas with people of low socioeconomic level. A single or mixed STH infection rarely causes death, but can affect nutritional status, growth, cognitive development and human health, especially in children.Objective To compare the nutritional status of STH-infected and uninfected children.Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in June 2010 in children from 3 primary schools in the Simpang Empat and Kabanjahe Subdistricts, Karo District, North Sumatera Province. Fecal examinations were done by the Kato-Katz method to diagnose STH infections. Participants of this study consisted of 140 infected children and 141 uninfected children. Nutritional status classification was based on the 2000 Centers for Disease Control growth charts. All categorical data were analyzed by Chi-square test.Results Of 140 infected children, 8.6% were infected with Ascaris lumbricoides, 17.1% with Trichuris trichiura and 74.3% with mixed infections (Ascaris lumbricoides and Trichuris trichiura). We found significantly more STH infected children with mild to moderate malnutrition than the uninfected group. We also found significantly more mildly to moderately malnourished children with moderate infection intensity than mild infection intensity.Conclusion We find significantly more STH infected children with mild to moderate malnutrition than the uninfected group. We also find significantly more mildly to moderately malnourished children with moderate infection intensity than mild infection intensity. Higher severity of infection is associated with lower nutritional status.
Reticulocyte hemoglobin content as a predictor of iron deficiency anemia Suari, Ni Made Rini; Ariawati, Ketut; Adiputra, Nyoman
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 55 No 3 (2015): May 2015
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (291.762 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi55.3.2015.171-5

Abstract

Background Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is the most common form of anemia in developing countries, such as Indonesia. Iron deficiency anemia in children is a serious problem because it affects their growth and development. Early detection of IDA and subsequent treatment in childhood may prevent future health problems.Objective To assess the use of reticulocyte hemoglobin content (CHr) to detect IDA in children aged 6-60 months.Methods We performed a cross-sectional study to measure the sensitivity and specificity of CHr compared to serum ferritin which is considered to be the gold standard for IDA diagnosis. The study was conducted from September 2011 to March 2013 in children aged 6-60 months who visited the Pediatric Outpatient Clinic, Sanglah Hospital, and Puskesmas II in West Denpasar. Data analysis was performed by 2x2 table. The results were assessed by area under the curve (AUC) and receiver operating characteristic (ROC).Results Of 121 children underwent blood testing during the study period, 69 children were excluded because they did not have hypochromic microcytic anemia, leaving 52 subjects eligible for the study. The prevalence of IDA in this study was 31%. Reticulocyte hemoglobin content (CHr) ≤ 23.1 pg had 88% (95%CI 71 to 100%) sensitivity and 25% (95%CI 11 to 39%) specificity.Conclusion Reticulocyte hemoglobin content < 23.1 pg may be a good predictor of IDA.
The accuracy of a clinical parameters-based scoring system to predict spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage in children under one year old Alfan, Harris; Arifin, Rita Dewi; Bahar, Erial; Ansori, Syarif Darwin
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 55 No 3 (2015): May 2015
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (315.49 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi55.3.2015.147-52

Abstract

Background Previous studies show that most children aged less than 1 year had intracranial hemorrhage without any history of trauma. The sign and symptoms of spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage (SIH) in children varies. To minimize morbidity and mortality, early detection and accurate diagnosis are required. Head CT scans area widely used for diagnosing SIH. Unfortunately, not all health facilities in Indonesia have CT scans.Objective To determine the accuracy of a clinical parameters-based scoring system in predicting spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage (SIH) in children under one year old.Methods This diagnostic study included children aged under one year who were admitted to Mohammad Hoesin Hospital, Palembang. Patients who showed any signs of increased intracranial pressure were recruited. Data were collected from medical records from January 2007 to September 2013. Through the use of logistic regression analysis, clinical parameters showing significant relationships with computerized tomography (CT)-scan confirmed SIH were selected as predictors. Each predictor was given a score based on an adjusted ratio. The cut-off point of the total scores from all patients was determined using a receiver operating curve (ROC) analysis. The accuracy of the total scores was calculated using a 2x2 validity test.Results Of the 186 children included in this study, 98 (52.7%) had SIH and 93 (94.8%) were under 3 month-old. The predictors for SIH used included age (>3 months: score 0; 1-3 months: score 3), gender (female: score 0; male: score 1), pallor (no: score 0; yes: score 1), bulging fontanel (no: score 0; yes: score 1), pupil (isocoria: score 0; anisocoria: score 2) and history of shaken baby (no: score 0; yes: score 3). The ROC analysis showed that the area under the curve (AUC) was 95.3% with a cut-off point of 4.5, had a sensitivity of 88.7% and a specificity of 93.1%Conclusion This scoring system based on clinical parameters had good accuracy for predicting SIH in children under 1 year of age who exhibited signs of increased intracranial pressure.
Prognostic factors for success in the Kangaroo Mother Care method for low birth weight babies Pratiwi, Rina; Kosim, Muhammad Sholeh; Wijayahadi, Noor
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 55 No 3 (2015): May 2015
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (259.134 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi55.3.2015.142-6

Abstract

Background Low birth weight (LBW) is closely related to neonatal morbidity and mortality. Management of LBW infants in developing countries remains limited, due to the low availability of incubators. The Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC) method has been shown to be effective for newborns, especially LBW infants, in which skin-to-skin contact may be conducive for infants’ weight gain, thermoregulation, and heart rate stability.Objective To determine the prognostic factors for KMC success in LBW babies.Methods This cohort study included LBW infants at Dr. Kariadi General Government Hospital, Semarang, by a consecutive sampling method. Success of KMC was assessed by infant weight gain, as well as stabilization of temperature, heart rate, and respiration. Prognostic factors for KMC success that we assessed were birth weight, gestational age, KMC duration, age at KMC onset and maternal education level. Statistical analyses used were Chi-square and relative risk (RR) tests.Results Of 40 LBW infants, 24 were successful in KMC. Birth weight ≥ 1500 grams (RR 0.4; 95%CI 0.23 to 0.73; P=0.001)], gestational age ≥ 34 weeks (RR 0.94; 95%CI 0.46 to 1.89; P=1.00), KMC duration ≥ 65 minutes (RR 1.44; 95%CI 0.76 to 2.75; P= 0.215), high maternal education level (RR 1.25; 95%CI 0.76 to 2.04; P=0.408), and age at KMC onset >10 days (RR 2.69; 95%CI 1.14 to 6.32; P=0.003), were factors that related to the successful of KMC.Conclusion Age at KMC onset > 10 days was a prognostic factor for KMC success in low birth weight babies.
Management of Lowe syndrome: a case report Prasetyo, Risky Vitria; Setiawan, Heru; Soemyarso, Ninik Asmaningsih; Noer, Mohammad Sjaifullah; Irwanto, Irwanto; Gunawan, Prastiya Indra; Loebis, Rozalina; Utomo, Sri Andreani; Tirthaningsih, Ni Wayan
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 55 No 3 (2015): May 2015
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (2093.872 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi55.3.2015.176-84

Abstract

Lowe syndrome (the oculocerebrorenal syndrome of Lowe, OCRL) is a multisystem disorder characterized by anomalies affecting the eyes, nervous system and kidneys.1-3 The disorder was first recognized by Lowe et al. in 1952, and described as a unique syndrome with organic aciduria, decreased renal ammonia production, hydrophthalmos, and mental retardation. In 1954, renal Fanconi syndrome was recognized as being associated with Lowe syndrome and in 1965, a recessive X-linked pattern of inheritance was determined.2,4 Lowe syndrome is a very rare disease, with an estimated prevalence in the general population of 1 in 500,000. According to the Lowe Syndrome Association (LSA) in the USA, the estimated prevalence is between 1 and 10 affected males in 1,000,000 people, with 190 living in the year 2000. The Italian Association of Lowe Syndrome estimated that there were 34 Lowe syndrome patients (33 boys and one girl) living in Italy in the year 2005.2,4,5 It almost exclusively affects males.6 Physicians may not be familiar with Lowe syndrome due to its rarity.4
Prevalence and risk factors of hearing loss in children with solid tumors treated with platinum-based chemotherapy Edward, Eka D; Rosdiana, Nelly; Farhat, Farhat; Siregar, Olga Rasiyanti; Lubis, Bidasari
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 55 No 3 (2015): May 2015
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (263.793 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi55.3.2015.121-5

Abstract

Background The platinum-based chemotherapy drugs, cisplatin and carboplatin, are widely used in the treatment of several types of solid tumors. However, the treatment has side effects including hearing loss.Objective To evaluate the prevalence of hearing loss related to platinum-based chemotherapy and to identify associated factors.Methods A cross-sectional study was performed in Adam Malik Hospital, Medan, North Sumatera, from April to July 2012. Twenty-two subjects who fulfilled the eligibility criteria underwent otoacoustic emission evaluations. Eleven children had received cisplatin and eleven had received carboplatin. The association between hearing loss and risk factors was assessed using Fisher’s exact and Chi-square tests.Results Seven subjects with hearing loss were identified. Five of these patients (5 out of 11) had received cisplatin and 2 patients (2 out of 11) had received carboplatin. There was no statistically significant difference between carboplatin- and cisplatin-associated hearing loss (P=0.361). Neither gender (P=0.452) nor age (P=0.212) was related to hearing loss. However, higher cumulative chemotherapy doses (cisplatin >600 mg/m² and carboplatin >1800 mg/m²) were associated with hearing loss (P=0.022 and P=0.004, respectively).Conclusion Patients who had higher cumulative doses of platinum-based chemotherapy are at risk for developing hearing loss.
Early initiation of breastfeeding at Dustira Hospital Ayukarningsih, Yoke; Dwinanda, Arief
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 55 No 3 (2015): May 2015
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (262.459 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi55.3.2015.126-30

Abstract

Background The infant mortality rate (IMR) in Indonesia is higher than that in other ASEAN countries. The highest rate of mortality occurs in the first 24 hours of life. Suboptimal breastfeeding initiation is a cause of high IMR. In an effort to decrease infant mortality, implementing early initiation of breastfeeding (EIB) has been encouraged.Objective To assess the success rate and time needed for latching on in EIB implementation.Methods We reviewed medical records of vaginal deliveries at Dustira Hospital, Cimahi, West Java, from June–November 2011.Results From 305 vaginal deliveries, 174 infants received EIB, though only 159 medical records could be assessed. The results showed that 52 % did EIB with a 91.8% success rate (defined as good implementation by WHO) and a 8.2% fail rate. In terms of subjects’ birth weights, the success rate of EIB implementation was 62.5% in the low birth weight (LBW) group, 94.9% in the normal birth weight (NBW) group, and 100% in the large birth weight or macrosomic group. The success rate of EIB implementation was 69.2% in the preterm group and 93.8% in the full term group. The success rate of EIB implementation was 71.4% in the LBW/fullterm group and 55.6% in the LBW/preterm group. The amount of time for infants to latch on was highest within the 30–44 minute group (52.7%).Conclusion The EIB implementation at Dustira Hospital was classified as good and the amount of time to latch on was 30-44 minutes.
Predictors of mortality in newborns with esophageal atresia: a 6-year study in a single institution Milano, Leecarlo; Agustriani, Nunik; Rochadi, Rochadi
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 55 No 3 (2015): May 2015
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (257.817 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi55.3.2015.131-5

Abstract

Background Esophageal atresia, with or without fistula, is a congenital defect that causes high morbidity and mortality in newborns. Risk factors of mortality need to be identified to establish the best approach for treating this condition in order to decrease morbidity and mortality.Objective To identify factors associated with mortality in newborns with oesophageal atresia.Methods We reviewed all newborns with esophageal atresia using data from their medical records at Sardjito General Hospital from January 2007 to December 2012. Potential risk factors were analyzed using Chi-square test, with a level of significance of P<0.05.Results Of 31 newborns that met our criteria, only 5 survived, and all 5 had one-stage surgery (primary anastomosis with fistula ligation). Thrombocytopenia and sepsis increased the risk of death with OR 10.857 (95%CI 1.029 to 114.578) and OR 13.333 (95% CI 1.242 to 143.151), respectively. However, anemia had a protective effect against mortality with OR 0.688 (95%CI 0.494 to 0.957).Conclusion Thrombocytopenia and sepsis are the risk factors associated with mortality in newborns with esophageal atresia at our institution. Anemia has a protective effect against mortality.
Immature-to-total neutrophil ratio as an early diagnostic tool of bacterial neonatal sepsis Darnifayanti, Darnifayanti; Tjipta, Guslihan Dasa; Rusdidjas, Rusdidjas; Lubis, Bugis Mardina
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 55 No 3 (2015): May 2015
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (301.732 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi55.3.2015.153-7

Abstract

Background Bacterial sepsis is the main cause of morbidity and mortality in neonates. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment for the condition can reduce mortality rates. Blood cultures are the gold standard to diagnose bacterial sepsis, but they require 3-5 days for results, whilst the disease may progress rapidly in neonates. Examination of immature-to-total neutrophil ratio (I/T ratio) in peripheral blood smears is a quicker and less expensive method to diagnose bacterial sepsis in neonates. Some studies found the sensitivity of I/T ratio to be 88%-90% in predicting bacterial spesis.Objective To assess the usefulness of the I/T ratio as an early diagnostic tool for neonatal bacterial sepsis.Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted from February to March 2011. Subjects were collected by consecutive sampling. Fifty-three neonates suspected to have bacterial sepsis in the Perinatology Unit at H. Adam Malik Hospital were included. Subjects underwent routine blood examinations, C-reactive protein level measurements, blood cultures, and peripheral blood smears. All statistical analyses were conducted with SPSS (version 16.0 for Windows).Results Of the 53 subjects, 26 had bacterial sepsis based on blood cultures. The I/T ratio had a sensitivity of 88.46%, specificity 81.84%, positive predictive value 82.14%, and negative predictive value 88%. The receiver operating characteristic curve showed a cut-off point of 83.3 (95%CI 71.3 to 95.3)%.Conclusion The I/T ratio may be a good alternative to blood cultures as an early indicator of bacterial neonatal sepsis, as it is faster, less expensive and has good sensitivity and specificity.
Social competence of 3 to 5-year-old children born with low birth weight Komariah, Nurul
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 55 No 3 (2015): May 2015
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (295.006 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi55.3.2015.158-63

Abstract

Background Low birth weight (LBW) has long been used as an indicator of public health. Low birth weight is not a proxy for any dimension of other maternal or perinatal health outcomes. Low birth weight infants require special care, and have more chronic conditions, learning delays, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorders compared to infants of normal birth weight (NBW). Social competence is viewed as a primary component of healthy function and development and is an important predictor of academic and financial success.Objective To examine social competence of children aged 3-5 years born with low birth weight.Methods This cross-sectional study was undertaken in Palembang in 2012. Subjects consisted of children aged 3-5 years attended a preschool in the Seberang Ulu I District, Palembang, and were divided into two groups: low birth weight (LBW) and normal birth weight (NBW). Social competence was assessed by observation and Interaction Rating Scale (IRS) and Parenting Style questionnaire (PSQ). Chi-square analysis was used to compare social competence between the two groups. Multivariate regression logistic analysis was used to assess for the dominant factors that may affect a child’s social competence.Results Low birth weight children aged 3 to 5 years had a 1.435 times higher risk of low social competence compared to normal birth weight children of similar age. (RP 1.435; 95%CI 1.372 to 13.507; P=0.019). Multivariate regression logistic analysis revealed that parenting style was a dominant factor affecting social competence.Conclusion Social competence in 3 to 5-year-old children born with low birth weight is lower compared to those with normal birth weight.

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