cover
Contact Name
-
Contact Email
-
Phone
-
Journal Mail Official
-
Editorial Address
-
Location
Kota semarang,
Jawa tengah
INDONESIA
Paediatrica Indonesiana
ISSN : 00309311     EISSN : 2338476X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
Paediatrica Indonesiana is a medical journal devoted to the health, in a broad sense, affecting fetuses, infants, children, and adolescents, belonged to the Indonesian Pediatric Society. Its publications are directed to pediatricians and other medical practitioners or researchers at all levels of health practice throughout the world.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 6 Documents
Search results for , issue "Vol 41 No 7-8 (2001): July 2001" : 6 Documents clear
EFFECT OF MORBIDITY ON CHANGE IN MID-UPPER ARM CIRCUMFERENCE IN CHILDREN UNDER FIVE YEARS OF AGE A COHORT STUDY IN PURWOREJO, CENTRAL JAVA, INDONESIA Machfudz, Soeroyo
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 41 No 7-8 (2001): July 2001
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (125.395 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi41.4.2001.225-30

Abstract

The objective of this study were to find out the effect of morbidity (diarrhoeal diseases /DD & acute respiratory infection/ARI) on mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC) in children uner five years of age and to evaluate the impact of potential confounding and effect modifying factors on association between morbidity and MUAC development i.e. socioeconomic status, living area and breast feeding. A cohort study was carried out to follow morbidity and MUAC development from February 1996 to January 1997, including home visits and examinations every 3 months, totally four times. Data were collected through interviews and MUAC was measured using standard non-stretchable plastic tape. This analysis was performed on 2708 individuals (45.3% of the total sample), where complete morbidity and MUAC information was available, DD and ARI prevalence was highest in the second half of infancy. The overall period prevalence of DD and ARI was 1.4 and 9.9%, respectively. There was a small, but significant negative effect of diarrhoea on change in MUAC among infants below one year in the rural area, less so in the urban area. In older children there was no association between morbidity and MUAC velocity. There was a small positive association between maternal education and MUAC development in both age groups. Diarrhoeal diseases, showed a negative influence on MUAC development in infancy. However, in this study MUAC development from 12 months and onwards was not influenced by the load of illness. MUAC seems to be less sensitive in reflecting the morbidity history of the child, as compared to other anthropometric measurements.
PERCEPTIONS OF MOTHERS ABOUT FOOD ALLERGY - A PRELIMINARY REPORT Prawirohartono, Endy P.
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 41 No 7-8 (2001): July 2001
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (105.955 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi41.4.2001.180-4

Abstract

The impact of food allergy on child growth and development should be properly evaluated, although the prevalence of food allergy is low. Most mothers in Indonesia still  practice food elimination if their children are suspected to suffer from food allergy. Types of food that are usually avoided are high-class protein sources such as egg, milk, beef and fish. These types of foods are important for maintaining growth and development during childhood. The aim of this study is to know the perceptions of mothers about food allergy, including its pathophysiology, clinical symptoms and signs, management, and types of foods as allergens. Among mostly 114 of medium to highly educated mothers, there were still wrong perceptions about food allergy. From 114 mothers, 48.2% of them believed that food allergy can not be inherited, egg causes furuncle (54.3%), breast milk causes atopic eczema (46.5%), and food allergy does not relate to respiratory symptoms. There was a relationship between these perceptions and mothers? educational level. Skin manifestations were most popular among mothers, whereas only 37.7% of mothers believed that food allergy can causes respiratory symptoms. Egg, shrimp, fish, and shellfish were types of animal foods which were popular, whereas peanut, soy, banana, rice and vegetables were recognized as the major causes of food allergy among non animal products.
DIAGNOSIS OF PEDIATRIC TUBERCULOSIS USING THE INDONESIAN NATIONAL CONCENCUS FOR PEDIATRIC TUBERCULOSIS Nataprawira, Heda Melinda D.; Kartasasmita, Cissy B.; Rosmayudi, Oma; Agustini, Hudiyati
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 41 No 7-8 (2001): July 2001
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (137.078 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi41.4.2001.185-90

Abstract

Diagnosing tuberculosis (TB) in children correctly is critical to appropriate treatment. However, diagnosing TB in children may be difficult and can be imprecise. As our national TB control program has not adequately covered TB in children and adult TB cases still in high rank, our national consensus for pediatric population may facilitate TB diagnosed especially in the field. This cross sectional study as part of longitudinal cohort study of epidemiology of Respiratory Syncitial Virus (RSV) in Indonesia (still ongoing) was conducted to know whether criteria used in the algorithm in the consensus compatible to suspected TB diagnosis. The study covered 1000 children under five randomly selected in two districts (Cikutra and Ujung Berung Indah) located in West Java. By using algorithm of The Indonesian National Consensus For Pediatric Tuberculosis (INCPT) with history of known or suspected adult source of TB or early reaction of BCG vaccination and certain general clinical symptoms associated TB as entry criteria for a higher index of suspicion, we diagnosed suspected TB in 57 children. We found that, history of known or suspected adult source of TB and certain general clinical symptoms are two main criteria for suspected TB diagnosis. It appeared that Mantoux test gave a smallest contribution to the diagnosis of suspected TB in the field. No other criterium except known or suspected adult source of TB fulfilled for other five children and prophylactic treatment for TB were given. Those children with suspected TB were given oral anti-tuberculosis (OAT) by Directly Observed Treatment Short course (DOTS) done by local trained persons. 
IRON STATUS IN BREAST-FED INFANTS Ratnadi, I Gusti Ayu Asih; Soetjiningsih, Soetjiningsih
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 41 No 7-8 (2001): July 2001
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (123.381 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi41.4.2001.191-6

Abstract

Ninety infants were selected stratified proportionally random sampling and they met the inclusion criteria. Iron status was determined by the serum ferritin level concentration. The nutritional status was determined by the body weight to age based on the standard criteria of WHO NCHS. The quality of food was defined by asking the parents to keep a diary of consumed in the last 7 days minimally for three days. Out of the 90 infants, 50.4 % of them were males and 45.6 % of them were females. Most of them (93.7%) had normal nourished and 8.3 % had undernourished. The prevalence status of low iron was 18.9%. The low iron status began to occur at the age of 4 ? 6 months old (6%) and the highest at the age of 9 ? 12 months old (65%). Statistically significant differences were found between the iron status and the quality of food supplements over age group. The low quality of food is a risk factor influence the status of low iron. It is suggested that the iron supplements be given to breast-fed infant at the age of 4 ? 6 months old.
IMMUNOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF PERSISTENT HEPATITIS B IN CHILDREN Notoatmojo, Harsoyo
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 41 No 7-8 (2001): July 2001
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (124.416 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi41.4.2001.208-13

Abstract

We studied the immunological status of 203 children having persistence Hepatitis B (positive HBsAg) ranging in age from 6 to 14 years in Semarang Municipality. The results of humoral immunity examination (IgM Anti-HBc) showed that all were negative, indicating that they are not in acute phase of hepatitis B infection. Cellular immunity examination, i.e., CMI skin test has shown positive result in 64.9% on persistent and 65.2% in non persistent hepatitis B (p>0.05). T cell examination showed statistically significant difference (p<0.01) between persistenct and non persistent hepatitis B patients, there was is also significant difference (p<0.01) on CD4 cell examination. These findings indicated that there was difference in immunoregulation function and response repression of antivirus between both groups of patients. On the other hand CD4/ CD8 ratio and T cell function showed no significant difference between the two gorups of patients; similarly the specific function of cytotoxic T cell was not significantly difference.
CLINICAL AND LABORATORY FEATURES OF CHILDHOOD SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS AND ITS COURSE IN DEPARTMENT OF CHILD HEALTH, CIPTO MANGUNKUSUMO HOSPITAL, JAKARTA Munasir, Zakiudin; Mariana, Tuty; Suradi, Rulina
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 41 No 7-8 (2001): July 2001
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (149.202 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi41.4.2001.214-24

Abstract

A descriptive, retrospective study has been performed among 33 children with SLE during the period of January 1986 to December 1999 in Department of Child Health, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital. The results of the present study show that SLE in childhood was more commonly found in girls than in boys, with a ratio of 4.5: 1. The mean age of onset was 10.5 years and the mean age of diagnosis was 10.9 years, most frequently observed in the age of > 10 years and rarely found in the age of < 5 years. The time interval between the time of onset and time of diagnosis ranged from 1 to 24 months and the most frequent interval was 1-3 months. The most common initial symptoms were prolonged fever, rash on the skin and face, and athralgia. In its natural history of the disease, kidneys, skin/mucous membrane and joints are the most frequent organs involved. Most of the SLE patients develop anemia. Positive anti ds-DNA, ANA and decreased levels of C3 and C4 respectively in 28 (28/31), in 29 (29/30), in 25 (25/33), and in 19 (19/27) cases. LE cells were encountered only in four (4/17) cases.  Out of 11 cases upon which renal biopsies were done, the most common histological features were mesangeal glomerulonephritis (class II) and diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis (class IV). The mean time interval between the onset and renal complication manifestations was 6.96 months, cardiac complication was 16.77 months, central nerve system was 22.71 months and lungs were 25.0 months. Duration of illness of patients with SLE ranged from 2 to 175 with the mean of 31.3 months. The causes of death were mostly due to gastrointestinal bleeding and renal failure.

Page 1 of 1 | Total Record : 6


Filter by Year

2001 2001


Filter By Issues
All Issue Vol 60 No 3 (2020): May 2020 Vol 60 No 2 (2020): March 2020 Vol 60 No 1 (2020): January 2020 Vol 59 No 6 (2019): November 2019 Vol 59 No 5 (2019): September 2019 Vol 59 No 4 (2019): July 2019 Vol 59 No 3 (2019): May 2019 Vol 59 No 2 (2019): March 2019 Vol 59 No 1 (2019): January 2019 Vol 59 No 3 (2019): May 2019 Vol 59 No 2 (2019): March 2019 Vol 58 No 6 (2018): November 2018 Vol 58 No 5 (2018): September 2018 Vol 58 No 4 (2018): July 2018 Vol 58 No 3 (2018): May 2018 Vol 58 No 2 (2018): March 2018 Vol 58 No 1 (2018): January 2018 Vol 57 No 6 (2017): November 2017 Vol 57 No 5 (2017): September 2017 Vol 57 No 4 (2017): July 2017 Vol 57 No 3 (2017): May 2017 Vol 57 No 2 (2017): March 2017 Vol 57 No 1 (2017): January 2017 Vol 56 No 6 (2016): November 2016 Vol 56 No 5 (2016): September 2016 Vol 56 No 4 (2016): July 2016 Vol 56 No 3 (2016): May 2016 Vol 56 No 2 (2016): March 2016 Vol 56 No 1 (2016): January 2016 Vol 55 No 1 (2015): January 2015 Vol 55 No 6 (2015): November 2015 Vol 55 No 5 (2015): September 2015 Vol 55 No 4 (2015): July 2015 Vol 55 No 3 (2015): May 2015 Vol 55 No 2 (2015): March 2015 Vol 55 No 1 (2015): January 2015 Vol 54 No 6 (2014): November 2014 Vol 54 No 5 (2014): September 2014 Vol 54, No 6 (2014): November 2014 Vol 54, No 5 (2014): September 2014 Vol 54 No 6 (2014): November 2014 Vol 54 No 5 (2014): September 2014 Vol 54 No 4 (2014): July 2014 Vol 54 No 3 (2014): May 2014 Vol 54 No 2 (2014): March 2014 Vol 54 No 1 (2014): January 2014 Vol 53 No 6 (2013): November 2013 Vol 53 No 5 (2013): September 2013 Vol 53 No 4 (2013): July 2013 Vol 53 No 3 (2013): May 2013 Vol 53 No 2 (2013): March 2013 Vol 53 No 1 (2013): January 2013 Vol 52 No 6 (2012): November 2012 Vol 52 No 5 (2012): September 2012 Vol 52 No 4 (2012): July 2012 Vol 52 No 3 (2012): May 2012 Vol 52 No 2 (2012): March 2012 Vol 52 No 1 (2012): January 2012 Vol 51 No 6 (2011): November 2011 Vol 51 No 5 (2011): September 2011 Vol 51 No 4 (2011): July 2011 Vol 51 No 3 (2011): May 2011 Vol 51 No 2 (2011): March 2011 Vol 51 No 1 (2011): January 2011 Vol 50 No 5 (2010): September 2010 Vol 50 No 4 (2010): July 2010 Vol 50 No 2 (2010): March 2010 Vol 50 No 1 (2010): January 2010 Vol 50, No 5 (2010): September 2010 Vol 50, No 4 (2010): July 2010 Vol 50, No 2 (2010): March 2010 Vol 50 No 6 (2010): November 2010 Vol 50 No 5 (2010): September 2010 Vol 50 No 3 (2010): May 2010 Vol 50 No 2 (2010): March 2010 Vol 50 No 1 (2010): January 2010 Vol 49 No 6 (2009): November 2009 Vol 49 No 5 (2009): September 2009 Vol 49 No 4 (2009): July 2009 Vol 49 No 3 (2009): May 2009 Vol 49 No 2 (2009): March 2009 Vol 49 No 1 (2009): January 2009 Vol 48 No 6 (2008): November 2008 Vol 48 No 5 (2008): September 2008 Vol 48 No 4 (2008): July 2008 Vol 48 No 3 (2008): May 2008 Vol 48 No 2 (2008): March 2008 Vol 48 No 1 (2008): January 2008 Vol 47 No 6 (2007): November 2007 Vol 47 No 5 (2007): September 2007 Vol 47 No 4 (2007): July 2007 Vol 47 No 3 (2007): May 2007 Vol 47 No 2 (2007): March 2007 Vol 47 No 1 (2007): January 2007 Vol 46 No 6 (2006): November 2006 Vol 46 No 5 (2006): September 2006 Vol 46 No 4 (2006): July 2006 Vol 46 No 3 (2006): May 2006 Vol 46 No 2 (2006): March 2006 Vol 46 No 1 (2006): January 2006 Vol 45 No 6 (2005): November 2005 Vol 45 No 5 (2005): September 2005 Vol 45 No 4 (2005): July 2005 Vol 45 No 3 (2005): May 2005 Vol 45 No 2 (2005): March 2005 Vol 45 No 1 (2005): January 2005 Vol 44 No 6 (2004): November 2004 Vol 44 No 5 (2004): September 2004 Vol 44 No 4 (2004): July 2004 Vol 44 No 3 (2004): May 2004 Vol 44 No 2 (2004): March 2004 Vol 44 No 1 (2004): January 2004 Vol 43 No 6 (2003): November 2003 Vol 43 No 5 (2003): September 2003 Vol 43 No 4 (2003): July 2003 Vol 43 No 3 (2003): May 2003 Vol 43 No 2 (2003): March 2003 Vol 43 No 1 (2003): January 2003 Vol 42 No 9-10 (2002): September 2002 Vol 42 No 5-6 (2002): May 2002 Vol 42 No 11-12 (2002): November 2002 Vol 42, No 6 (2002): November 2002 Vol 42, No 5 (2002): September 2002 Vol 41 No 9-10 (2001): September 2001 Vol 41 No 7-8 (2001): July 2001 Vol 41 No 5-6 (2001): May 2001 Vol 41 No 3-4 (2001): March 2001 Vol 41 No 11-12 (2001): November 2001 Vol 41, No 6 (2001): November 2001 Vol 41, No 5 (2001): September 2001 Vol 41, No 4 (2001): July 2001 Vol 41, No 3 (2001): May 2001 Vol 41, No 2 (2001): March 2001 Vol 41 No 1-2 (2001): January 2001 Vol 39 No 9-10 (1999): September 1999 Vol 39 No 7-8 (1999): July 1999 Vol 39 No 5-6 (1999): May 1999 Vol 39 No 3-4 (1999): March 1999 Vol 39 No 11-12 (1999): November 1999 Vol 39 No 1-2 (1999): January 1999 Vol 39, No 3-4 (1999): March 1999 Vol 39, No 1-2 (1999): January 1999 Vol 38 No 9-10 (1998): September 1998 Vol 38 No 3-4 (1998): March 1998 Vol 38 No 11-12 (1998): November 1998 Vol 38 No 1-2 (1998): January 1998 Vol 37 No 9-10 (1997): September-October 1997 Vol 37 No 5-6 (1997): May-June 1997 Vol 37 No 3-4 (1997): March-April 1997 Vol 37 No 1-2 (1997): January-February 1997 Vol 37, No 9-10 (1997): September-October 1997 Vol 37, No 5-6 (1997): May-June 1997 Vol 37, No 3-4 (1997): March-April 1997 Vol 37, No 1-2 (1997): January-February 1997 Vol 36 No 7-8 (1996): July-August 1996 Vol 36 No 5-6 (1996): May-June 1996 Vol 36 No 11-12 (1996): November-December 1996 Vol 36, No 7-8 (1996): July-August 1996 Vol 36, No 5-6 (1996): May-June 1996 Vol 36, No 11-12 (1996): November-December 1996 Vol 35 No 1-2 (1995): January 1995 Vol 35 No 9-10 (1995): September 1995 Vol 35 No 7-8 (1995): July 1995 Vol 35 No 5-6 (1995): May 1995 Vol 35 No 3-4 (1995): March 1995 Vol 34 No 7-8 (1994): July 1994 Vol 34 No 5-6 (1994): May 1994 Vol 34 No 3-4 (1994): March 1994 Vol 34 No 1-2 (1994): January 1994 Vol 33 No 7-8 (1993): July 1993 Vol 33 No 5-6 (1993): May 1993 Vol 33 No 3-4 (1993): March 1993 Vol 33 No 1-2 (1993): January 1993 Vol 32 No 7-8 (1992): July 1992 Vol 32 No 5-6 (1992): May 1992 Vol 32 No 3-4 (1992): March 1992 Vol 32 No 11-12 (1992): November 1992 Vol 31 No 5-6 (1991): May 1991 Vol 31 No 3-4 (1991): March 1991 Vol 31 No 11-12 (1991): November 1991 Vol 31, No 11-12 (1991): November 1991 Vol 31 No 9-10 (1991): September 1991 Vol 31 No 7-8 (1991): July 1991 Vol 31 No 5-6 (1991): May 1991 Vol 30 No 11-12 (1990): November 1990 Vol 29 No 3-4 (1989): March 1989 Vol 29 No 1-2 (1989): January 1989 Vol 29, No 9-10 (1989): September 1989 Vol 29, No 5-6 (1989): May 1989 Vol 29, No 1-2 (1989): January 1989 Vol 29 No 9-10 (1989): September 1989 Vol 29 No 7-8 (1989): July 1989 Vol 29 No 5-6 (1989): May 1989 Vol 29 No 3-4 (1989): March 1989 Vol 29 No 11-12 (1989): November 1989 Vol 28 No 9-10 (1988): September 1988 Vol 28 No 7-8 (1988): July 1988 Vol 28 No 3-4 (1988): March 1988 Vol 28 No 11-12 (1988): November 1988 Vol 28 No 5-6 (1988): May 1988 Vol 28 No 1-2 (1988): January 1988 Vol 26 No 4 (1986): July 1986 Vol 25 No 5-6 (1985): May 1985 Vol 24 No 7-8 (1984): July 1984 Vol 24 No 1-2 (1984): January 1984 Vol 24 No 9-10 (1984): September 1984 Vol 24 No 7-8 (1984): July 1984 Vol 24 No 5-6 (1984): May 1984 Vol 24 No 3-4 (1984): March 1984 Vol 24 No 11-12 (1984): November 1984 Vol 24 No 1-2 (1984): January 1984 Vol 22 No 9-10 (1982): September 1982 Vol 22 No 7-8 (1982): July 1982 Vol 22 No 5-6 (1982): May 1982 Vol 22 No 3-4 (1982): March 1982 Vol 22 No 11-12 (1982): November 1982 Vol 22 No 1-2 (1982): January 1982 Vol 22, No 9-10 (1982): September 1982 Vol 22, No 7-8 (1982): July 1982 Vol 22, No 5-6 (1982): May 1982 Vol 22, No 3-4 (1982): March 1982 Vol 22, No 11-12 (1982): November 1982 Vol 22, No 1-2 (1982): January 1982 Vol 21 No 9-10 (1981): September 1981 Vol 21 No 7-8 (1981): July 1981 Vol 21 No 5-6 (1981): May 1981 Vol 21 No 3-4 (1981): March 1981 Vol 21 No 11-12 (1981): November 1981 Vol 21 No 1-2 (1981): January 1981 Vol 21, No 9-10 (1981): September 1981 Vol 21, No 7-8 (1981): July 1981 Vol 21, No 5-6 (1981): May 1981 Vol 21, No 3-4 (1981): March 1981 Vol 21, No 11-12 (1981): November 1981 Vol 21, No 1-2 (1981): January 1981 Vol 20 No 3-4 (1980): March 1980 Vol 19 No 9-10 (1979): September 1979 Vol 19 No 3-4 (1979): March 1979 Vol 19 No 11-12 (1979): November 1979 Vol 19 No 1-2 (1979): January 1979 Vol 18 No 9-10 (1978): September 1978 Vol 18 No 5-6 (1978): May 1978 Vol 18 No 3-4 (1978): March 1978 Vol 18 No 11-12 (1978): November 1978 Vol 18 No 1-2 (1978): January 1978 Vol 16 No 9-10 (1976): September 1976 Vol 16 No 3-4 (1976): March 1976 Vol 16 No 1-2 (1976): January 1976 Vol 15 No 9-10 (1975): September 1975 Vol 15 No 7-8 (1975): July 1975 Vol 15 No 3-4 (1975): March 1975 Vol 15 No 11-12 (1975): November 1975 Vol 15 No 1-2 (1975): January 1975 Vol 14 No 9-10 (1974): September 1974 Vol 14 No 7-8 (1974): July 1974 Vol 14 No 5-6 (1974): May 1974 Vol 14 No 3-4 (1974): March 1974 Vol 14 No 11-12 (1974): November 1974 Vol 14 No 1-2 (1974): January 1974 Vol 13 No 4 (1973): April 1973 Vol 13 No 3 (1973): March 1973 Vol 13 No 2 (1973): February 1973 Vol 13 No 1 (1973): January 1973 Vol 13, No 4 (1973): April 1973 Vol 13, No 3 (1973): March 1973 Vol 13, No 2 (1973): February 1973 Vol 13, No 1 (1973): January 1973 More Issue