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Paediatrica Indonesiana
ISSN : 00309311     EISSN : 2338476X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
Paediatrica Indonesiana is a medical journal devoted to the health, in a broad sense, affecting fetuses, infants, children, and adolescents, belonged to the Indonesian Pediatric Society. Its publications are directed to pediatricians and other medical practitioners or researchers at all levels of health practice throughout the world.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 6 Documents
Search results for , issue "Vol 41 No 9-10 (2001): September 2001" : 6 Documents clear
COMMUNITY TRIALS ON CASE MANAGEMENT OF ACUTE RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS (ARI) IN RURAL VILLAGES Kartasasmita, Cissy B.; Mintardaningsih, Mintardaningsih; Rosmayudi, O.; Suardi, A. U.; Sukandar, H.
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 41 No 9-10 (2001): September 2001
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (188.739 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi41.5.2001.260-3

Abstract

A community trial was conducted in two rural subdistricts in Subang, West Java, Indonesia, i.e., Cisalak as the intervention area and Sagalaherang as reference area. The study aimed to evaluate the usefulness new version of case management on acute respiratory tract infections (ARI). All babies born between January and December 1994 were enrolled in the study, and followed for 6 to 12 months. The field workers visited the babies every 2 weeks. They examined the babies and interviewed mothers about ARI symptoms, by using a pretested questionnaire. During that period 969 babies were born, 53.3% in Cisalak and 46.7% in Sagalaherang; 548 of them were followed for 12 months; however, only 263 among them had complete data. The morbidity of ARI increased with increasing age; there was no difference between those two study areas. The prevalence of ARI at the age of less than 3 months was 35.1% and 32.7%; between 4 to 6 months 49.9% and 45.3%; between 7 to 9 months 47.0% and 45.9% ; and between 10 to 12 months 53.7% and 50%, for Cisalak and Sagalaherang, respectively. Nevertheless, the mortality in Sagalaherang was higher than in Cisalak  (118 per 1000 and 78 per 1000, respectively), and the pneumonia-related deaths were 64.8% and 52.5%, respectively. The age specific death rate for pneumonia was high among babies of less than 3 months of age, i.e., 68.5% and 57.2%, respectively. We conclude that mothers and primary health care workers in rural areas should be taught and encouraged to use case management of ARI, and monitoring and evaluation of the application is needed.
ROLE OF MOTHER’S PERCEPTIONS ON THEIR CHILD DEVELOPMENT ON EARLY DETECTION OF DEVELOPMENTAL DEVIATION Andayani, Pudji; Soetjiningsih, Soetjiningsih
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 41 No 9-10 (2001): September 2001
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (183.579 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi41.5.2001.264-7

Abstract

This report aimed to assess mothers? perceptions on normal and deviation of development in their children. The study was done in underfive children and their mothers from May 1st 1999 to June 30th 1999 who visited the Nutrition, Growth & Development Clinic of the Child Health Department, Sanglah Hospital, Denpasar. A total of 76 children between 2 and 59 months of age and their mothers were enrolled. Data were collected by interview with mothers concerning the following items: perception of their children development, age of child, sex, mother?s education, mother?s job, number of sibling, and mother ability in making referral decisions. Denver II screening test was administered to each child to identify of development status as a gold standard. Sixteen (21%) children was identified as having developmental deviation (by mother?s perception) and 21 (28%) by authors using Denver II screening test. The mother?s perception sensitivity was 67% and specificity was 97%. There were no significant differences of development status perception according to child?s age, mother?s education, mother?s job, and number of sibling. Most of mother?s perceptions about normal development were if the body weight increased and had no disability. Most of the sources of information about development was from the relatives. Thirteen of 21 children who had developmental deviation were referred by mothers. We conclude that mother?s perception can be used as early detection of developmental problems. Mother?s concerns of their children growth development had focused on again body weight, physical developmental and gross motor skill.
COMPARATIVE STUDY BETWEEN EVIDENCE-BASED OR PROBLEMBASED LEARNING AND CONVENTIONAL METHOD TO IMPROVE THE CLINICAL PROBLEM SOLVING OF THE MEDICAL STUDENTS Saharso, Darto; Erny, Erny
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 41 No 9-10 (2001): September 2001
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (223.97 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi41.5.2001.268-72

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to compare learning methods between the conventional and educational technology with evidence-based medicine and problem based learning methods, which is in accordance with the ability of clinical problem solving of medical students. This quasi-experimental study involed medical students at ninth semester, index of achievement ranging between 2.5?3 and worked at the Child Health Department of Dr Soetomo Hospital from January until December 2000. Data included performance of history taking, physical examination, summary, diagnosis, planning examination, therapy, complication, prognosis, pathophysiology and total score. All of variables were analyzed by using t test with p < 0.05 was considered to be significant. We found significant difference between the two groups in terms of history taking, building the summary; establishing diagnosis, planning further investigations, planning treatment, predicting complication, and describing the pathophysiology, and total scores, but did not see any difference physical examination t = 0.3 p > 0.05 and in predicting prognosis. We concluded that the use of educational technology with problem-based learning and evidence-based medicine methods significantly improve the problem clinic solving of the medical students.
CLINICAL FEATURES AND SURVIVAL PATTERN OF CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM LEUKEMIA IN CHILDREN WITH ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA Pusponegoro, Hardiono D.; Z., Moeslichan M.; Kaban, Risma K.; Suradi, Rulina; Windiastuti, Endang
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 41 No 9-10 (2001): September 2001
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (300.834 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi41.5.2001.247-52

Abstract

Infiltration of leukemic cells into the central nervous system (CNS) is one of the causes of neurological disorders in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) that worsen the prognosis. This retrospective cohort study aimed to review the clinical manifestations of children with CNS leukemia, their survival pattern and the role of early CNS leukemial. The survival curve was developed by Kaplan-Meier method, while the comparison of survival curves was done with log-rank test. Among 128 new ALL patients, 23 (18.0%) patients suffered from CNS leukemia, while 13 (10.2%) suffered from early CNS leukemia and 10 (7.8%) suffered from relapsing CNS leukemia. CNS leukemia was more common in male, in those aged less than 2 years, in those with white blood cell (WBC) count above 50,000/ìl, and in patients type FAB-L2 ALL. The clinical manifestations most commonly found were decrease of consciousness (61%), vomiting (48%), cranial nerve palsy (44%), seizures (39%), and headache (26%). Relapsing CNS leukemia was more common in high risk (12.5%) compared with standard risk leukemia (5.7%). Patients with early CNS leukemia had a lower survival rate than those without early CNS leukemia (p = 0.0005). The percentage of patients with early CNS leukemia surviving up to 3 years was 26%. We conclude that early CNS leukemia could cause low survival ALL patients.
CONGENITAL URONEPHROPATHY PATTERN IN CHILDREN Alatas, Husein; Soesilawati, Natalina; Madiyono, Bambang
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 41 No 9-10 (2001): September 2001
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (266.674 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi41.5.2001.241-6

Abstract

To obtain the basic data of congenital uronephropathy pattern and the affecting factors in children, we conducted a cross-sectional study at the Department of Child Health Cipto Mangunkusumo (CM) Hospital Jakarta from 1995 to 1999 and 9 teaching hospitals throughout Indonesia. During the study period 134 patients were obtained, 116 patients from the CM Hospital and 18 patients from other teaching hospitals. Most patients (48.8%) were below 1 year of age; male were affected more than female (2.4:1). The disorder was classified into two groups, i.e., congenital nephropathy and uropathy. There were 10 children with nephropathy, i.e., 4 with unilateral renal hypoplasia, 3 with polycystic kidney, and 3 with renal agenesis. In the uropathy group, 43 were with hypospadia, 22 with primary reflux vesicoureter, 18 with neurogenic bladder, and 17 with ureteropelvic junction obstruction. The complications found were urinary tract infection (71.2%), chronic renal failure (15.7%), hypertension (3.7%), and acute renal failure (1.5%). Consanguinity, familial disorders, maternal diseases, x-ray exposure and abortion efforts were found in a small proportion of patients. History of drug or herbs use in the first trimester of pregnancy was found in a large proportion of patients, mostly took analgesics (especially acetaminophen). In conclusion, uropathy disorders were much more common than congenital nephropathy. The most common complication was urinary tract infection, followed by chronic renal failure, hypertension, and acute renal failure.
CONGENITAL HEART DISEASE IN ADULTS AND ITS PROBLEMS Ontoseno, Teddy
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 41 No 9-10 (2001): September 2001
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (184.04 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi41.5.2001.237-40

Abstract

There were 40 adult congenital heart disease (CHD) patients seen in the Cardiology Division during 1 year (February 1993 - February 1994). The most frequently seen defect was atrial septal defect; however there were also cases with patent ductus arteriosus, pulmonary stenosis, ventricular septal defect, and tetralogy of Fallot. Hemodynamic disorder, serious hindrance to education achievement, and occupational threat due to limited physical capabilities as well as malnutrition are some of prominent issues to be closely anticipated. In general the older the patients the more serious hemodynamic disorder they suffer due CHD. It is worth thinking how to improve the quality of life of CHD patients who succeed to live their adult lives and minimize any possible fatal complication risks.

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