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Paediatrica Indonesiana
ISSN : 00309311     EISSN : 2338476X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
Paediatrica Indonesiana is a medical journal devoted to the health, in a broad sense, affecting fetuses, infants, children, and adolescents, belonged to the Indonesian Pediatric Society. Its publications are directed to pediatricians and other medical practitioners or researchers at all levels of health practice throughout the world.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 13 Documents
Search results for , issue "Vol 50 No 1 (2010): January 2010" : 13 Documents clear
Relationship of obesity and secondary sexual development in girls Dewi, Ida Ayu Sri Kusuma; Soetjiningsih, Soetjiningsih; Patria, Yudha
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 50 No 1 (2010): January 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (437.465 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi50.1.2010.49-55

Abstract

Background Obesity is a pathological condition due to consumption of excessive amount of food and is associated with early sexual maturation and irregular cycle of menstruation. Early sexual maturation is estimated from the age of menarche.Objective To determine relationship of obesity and age of secondary sexual development in girls.Methods This cross-sectional study was performed on all elementary school students in 4 sub-districts at Denpasar. Nutritional status was determined by BMI. Radiologic examination was performed to determine the bone age. Data were analyzed with appropriate statstical methods.Results Mean chronological age of breasts development for B2 and B3 stage on obese group was younger than non-obese groups (9.0 vs 9.9, P = 0.001; 9.7 vs 10.9, P = 0.006). Early menarche more frequent in obese group than non-obese groups {PR 5 (CI 95% 1.33 to 19.71)}. Mean age of children who experienced menarche on obese group was younger than non-obese group {10.9(SD 0.61) vs 11.1 (SD 0.28). Univariate analysis showed that maturation age of secondary sexual development on obese groups was differed with non-obese group {8.9 (SD 0.21) vs 9.4 (SD 0.13). Linear regression analysis showed relationship between age of breasts and pubic hair growth on both groups.Conclusions This study established that mean age of secondary sexual development was younger in obese girl than non-obese group. Bone age range on obese girls was wider than non-obese girls. [Paediatr Indones. 2010;50:49-5].
Parents Evaluation of Developmental Status and Denver Developmental Screening Test II in high risk infant and toddler Koesnandar, Effie; Soedjatmiko, Soedjatmiko; Amalia, Pustika
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 50 No 1 (2010): January 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (283.657 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi50.1.2010.26-30

Abstract

Background. Developmental screening is important particularly for high risk infants and toddlers. Parents Evaluation of Developmental Status (PEDS) and Denver Developmental Screening Test II (Denver II test) are recommended instruments with good sensitivity and specificity. Compared to Denver II test, PEDS is simpler, thus it is important to assess the agreement of PEDS and Denver II test.Objectives. To determine the prevalence of developmental disorder in high risk infants and toddlers and agreement of PEDS and Denver II test.Methods. Infants and toddlers registered at pediatric high risk clinic were recruited. PEDS questionnaire was answered by parents while the Denver II test performed by the investgator. Agreement of PEDS and Denver II instrument was assessed by Kappa score.Results. Out of 71 subjects, 41 (58%) were male, 43 (61%) were >12 months old, 35 (49%) were undernourished, 42 (59%) were preterm (<37 week gestational age), and 43 (60.6%) were low birth weight (LBW). The prevalence of developmental disorder was higher in subjects >12 months old (42%), undernourished (49%), preterm (48%), and LBW (47%). The prevalence of developmental disorder was 49% by PEDS and 39% by Denver II test. Agreement of PEDS and Denver II test was good with Kappa score 0.52, particularly for gross motor and language domain.Conclusions. The prevalence of developmental disorder is higher in high risk infant and toddler, who >12 months old, undernourished, premature, and LBW. PEDS instrument are equivalent to Denver II test, shows good agreement, particularly for gross motor and language domain. [Paediatr Indones. 2010;50:26-30].
Breast-feeding duration and children’s nutritional status at age 12-24 months Susilowati, Susilowati; Kusharisupeni, Kusharisupeni; Fikawati, Sandra; Achmad, Kusdinar
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 50 No 1 (2010): January 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (311.813 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi50.1.2010.56-61

Abstract

Background Relation between breast-feeding duration and children’s nutritional status is still a controversy. Positive as well as negative relation were shown. This study aimed to support this current issue on breast feeding duration and nutritional status of children aged 12-24 months.Objective To analyze relationship between breast-feeding duration and nutritional status of children aged 12-24 months.Methods A cross sectional study was conducted with 246 proportional stratified random coupled samples (mothers and weaned children) with inclusion criteria: normal birth weight, full-term delivery and no physical and psychological problems. Data from children were measured using Seca® digital weight scale, wooden length board, while data from mothers were collected through 1x24 Hours Food Recall Form, and a questionnaire on mother’s knowledge.Results The average of breast-feeding duration was 15 months. The prevalence of malnutrition was quite low (<10%), but the prevalence of stunting was high enough (20.7%) while wasting was moderately high (10.6%). Breast-feeding duration was significantly associated to children’s nutritional status (height-for-age index and weight-for-height index). The highest correlation was found in height-for-age index (r = 0.403). Regression model revealed that breast-feeding duration, exclusive breast-feeding, diarrhea, working mother, mother’s knowledge, energy intake, and protein intake were independently associated with children’s nutritional status.Conclusions As this study found that the average of breast-feeding duration was 15 months and there was a significant association between breast-feeding duration and nutritional status (height-for-age index) of children 12-24 months old, thus these findings strengthen the recommendation of WHO to continue breast feeding up to 2 years old. [Paediatr Indones. 2010;50:56-61].
Prevalence and factors associated with behavioral disorders in children with chronic health conditions Adji, Budi Santoso; Soetjiningsih, Soetjiningsih; Windiani, Trisna
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 50 No 1 (2010): January 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (306.455 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi50.1.2010.1-5

Abstract

Background Patients suffering from chronic health conditions are compelled to strive to adjust in their communities. As a result, changes in their physical and psychosocial states are likely to occur. Several studies have described the prevalence of behavioral disorders in such patients. Pediatric Symptom Checklist (PSC) is a screening tool to detect behavioral disorders in children with chronic illness.Objective To determine the prevalence of and factors associated with behavioral disorders in children with chronic health conditions.Methods A cross sectional study was conducted on 4 to 14 year-old-children with chronic diseases in out-patient clinic, Sanglah Hospital from October to December 2008. PSC-17 was used to screen the presence of behavioral disorders. Bivariate analysis and logistic regression were used for analysis.Results One hundred and four children were included in this study. The prevalence of behavioral disorder based on PSC-17 score ≥ 15 was 37.5%. The study showed that duration of illness of more than 3 years had significant correlation with behavioral disorders, compared with the group of 3 month – 3 years duration of illness (OR 3.30, 95% CI 1.33 to 8.22, P = 0.010}.Conclusions Prevalence of behavioral disorders in children with chronic health condition is 37.5%. The duration of illness contributes to the manifestation of behavioral disorders in children with chronic health conditions. [Paediatr Indones. 2010;50:1-5].
Incidence and risk factors of neonatal thrombocytopenia: a preliminary study Kusumasari, Nila; Rohsiswatmo, Rinawati; Gatot, Djajadiman; Darwis, Darlan
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 50 No 1 (2010): January 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (343.074 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi50.1.2010.31-7

Abstract

Background Thrombocytopenia is the most common hematological abnormality in the neonatal period. Hemorrhagic manifestations are found in 10% cases of thrombocytopenia. Neonatal thrombocytopenia commonly assumed due to sepsis, despite many risk factors that may caused thrombocytopenia.Objective To obtain incidence and risk factors of neonatal thrombocytopenia.Methods A cross sectional study was conducted in April 2009. Complete blood counts investigation was performed before age of 24 hours, medical conditions and risk factors of mothers and subjects were noted, as well as hemorrhagic manifestations. Subjects with thrombocytopenia were followed for 2 weeks. The risk factors consisted of hypertension in pregnancy, pre-eclampsia, eclampsia, intrauterine growth retardation, gestational diabetes mellitus, perinatal infection, asphyxia, sepsis, and necrotizing enterocolitis.Results Neonatal thrombocytopenia was found 17 (12.1%) of 140 subjects, consisted of 88.2% early onset and 11.8% late onset. Significant risk factor of mother was pre-eclampsia (PR 3.97, 95%CI 1.70 to 9.25), while significant risk factors of neonates were asphyxia (PR 5.66, 95%CI 2.49 to 12.86), sepsis (PR 5.33, 95%CI 2.33-12.19) and necrotizing enterocolitis (p=0.014; PR 9.2 95% CI 5.17 to14.84). We found 29.4% hemorrhagic cases of neonatal thrombocytopenia (i.e.,. skin, gastrointestinal, intracranial hemorrhage).Conclusions The incidence of neonatal thrombocytopenia was 12.2%. Significant risk factor of mother that caused thrombocytopenia was pre-eclampsia, while risk factors of neonates were asphyxia, sepsis and necrotizing enterocolitis.[Paediatr Indones. 2010;50:31-7].
Validity of parents’ evaluation of developmental status (PEDS) in detecting developmental disorders in 3-12 month old infants Gustawan, I Wayan; Soetjiningsih, Soetjiningsih; Machfudz, Soeroyo
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 50 No 1 (2010): January 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi50.1.2010.6-10

Abstract

Background Early detection of development disorder is an effort to recognize disorders in every developmental stage. Parents’ concern can be helpful in identifying children in need of assessment and can be used as a prescreening test to reduce the number of children who require formal screening.Objective To examine diagnostic value of parents’ evaluation of developmental status (PEDS) instrument in order to determine developmental disorders in infant.Methods One hundred and seventy infants, 3-12 months old who visited Pediatric Outpatient Clinic were recruited. The parents filled in the PEDS questionnaire and the results were compared with those of Bayley Scales of Infant Development Second Edition (BSID-II) as a gold standard. The diagnostic properties of PEDS were then calculated.Results PEDS showed a sensitivity of 83.9% (95% CI 67.8 to 93.8), a specificity of 81.3% (95% CI 74.2 to 87.1), a positive predictive value of 50.0% (95% CI 40.6 to 59.4), a negative predictive value of 95.8% (95% CI 91.2 to 98.0), a likelihood ratio positive of 4.5 (95% CI 3.1 to 6.6), a likelihood ratio negative of 0.2 (95% CI 0.1 to 0.4), a pre-test probability of 18.2% and a post-test probability of 49.9% (95% CI 40.6 to 59.3).Conclusion PEDS can be used as an initial screening test to detect developmental disorders in 3-12 month infants. [Paediatr Indones. 2010;50:6-10].
Prevalence and risk factors for epilepsy in children with spastic cerebral palsy Rahmat, Dedy; Mangunatmadja, Irawan; Tridjaja, Bambang; Tambunan, Taralan; Suradi, Rulina
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 50 No 1 (2010): January 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (308.099 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi50.1.2010.11-7

Abstract

Background Epilepsy in cerebral palsy (CP) is usually difficult to treat and can lead to poor prognosis due to increased risk for motor and cognitive disorders. The prevalence and risk factors of epilepsy in children with CP vary among studies.Objective To determine the prevalence and risk factors for epilepsy in spastic CP.Methods We performed a retrospective study using medical records of patients with spastic CP at the Departement of Child Health, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital from January 2003 until December 2008. Prevalence ratio was calculated by comparing the prevalence of epilepsy in subjects with and without risk factors. We excluded patients with metabolic disorder, genetic syndrome, and onset of CP after 3 years of age.Results Two hundred thirty six out of 238 spastic CP patients were analyzed. The mean age at diagnosis of spastic CP was 28.8 months. Male to female ratio was 1.4:1. The prevalence of epilepsy in spastic CP was 39%. The risk factors for epilepsy in spastic CP were central nervous system infection, the ocurrence of seizure in the first year of life, and abnormality of EE G.Conclusions The prevalence of epilepsy in spastic CP is 39%. The risk factors for epilepsy in spastic CP are post central nervous system infection, and ocurrence of seizure in the first year of life. [Paediatr Indones. 2010;50:11-7].
Awareness, understanding, and help seeking for behaviour problems by parents of primary school age children in Central Jakarta: A qualitative study Wiguna, Tjhin; Belfer, Myron L.
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 50 No 1 (2010): January 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (307.647 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi50.1.2010.18-25

Abstract

Background Understanding children’s behaviour and emotional conditions will allow parents to help them cope with the tasks of growing up. The accuracy of parents to identify their children as needing mental health services, and the factor that might influence parental perceptions is important.Objectives To explore parents’ recognition and help-seeking patterns for behavior and emotional problems of school age children; To identify parents’ perceived needs and barriers in achieving access to appropriate mental health services.Methods We involved six parents who had primary school children with behavior and/or emotional problems identified by their class teacher. Parents were interviewed by using a semistructured clinical interview, some were adapted from the Arthur Kleinman’s explanatory model of illness. Data were presented in descriptive and interpretative accounts.Results In general, parents were aware that their children had behavioural and emotional problems but assumed it was part of their normal development. Four parents did not take their children to seek any professional help, assuming they would be able to overcome this situation with the helping hand from the school class teachers. Parents perceived that they were weak in parenting their child.Conclusion This study emphasizes the need to increase parents’ awareness and understanding and helping agencies so they can recognize the problems accurately and overcome the barriers appropriately. [Paediatr Indones. 2010;50:18-25].
Comparison of combination of probiotic and standard therapy compared to standard therapy on eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection in children Aryani, Fransisca Theresia; Firmansyah, Agus; Latief, Abdul
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 50 No 1 (2010): January 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14238/pi50.1.2010.38-41

Abstract

Background Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is thought to be the etiology of chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, and risk factor for gastric cancer. Management of H. pylori infection in children is associated with several problems such as compliance to therapy, untolerated side effects, and antibiotic resistance. Probiotic is reported to give beneficial effect in the management of H. pylori infection and there is no study yet on the effect of probiotic in eradication of H. pylori infection in Indonesian children.Objectives To study the effect of additional probiotic in the standard therapy on the rate of H. pylori infection eradication in children and its side effect.Methods This was a double blind randomized controlled trial performed in 23 children with H. pylori infection at Kampung Melayu and Rawa Bunga District. The diagnosis was determined based on Helicobacter pylori stool antigen test (HpSA). Subjects were randomly assigned to either receive receive amoxiycilin, clarithromycin, omeprazole, and probiotic (2 x 109 cfu of Lactobacillus acidophilus La5 and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12) or amoxicillin, clarithromycin, omeprazole dan placebo (maltodextrin). HpSA examination was evaluated again after 2 weeks of therapy.Results Two of 13 subjects in the treatment group and 6 of 10 subjects in the control group experienced side effects. Eradication rate in the treatment group is higher than the control group (13/13 vs 7/10) but the correlation between additional probiotic with the eradication rate of H. pylori is not statistically significant.Conclusions Probiotic can reduce the incidence of side effects due to antibiotic used in H. pylori eradication (2/13 vs 6/10, p < 0.012). [Paediatr Indones. 2010;50:38-41].
Identification of emotional and behavior problems in obese children using Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) and 17-items Pediatric Symptom Checklist (PSC-17) Harahap, Dwi Fachri; Sjarif, Damayanti Rusli; Soedjatmiko, Soedjatmiko; Widodo, Dwi Putro; Tedjasaputra, Mayke Sugianto
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 50 No 1 (2010): January 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (334.022 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi50.1.2010.42-8

Abstract

Background Obesity can result in emotional and behavior problems in school-age children. Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) is a standard instrument for evaluating behavior problems, however it is considered not practical. The 17-item Pediatric Symptom Checklist (PSC-17) is a more simple instrument but its diagnostic value has never been evaluated in obese children.Objectives To evaluate the diagnostic value of PSC-17 compared to CBCL as the gold standard.Methods This cross-sectional study was done in May - June 2009. Children aged 6-12 years with obesity were included. Parents filled the CBCL and PSC-17 questionnaires. Sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, and likelihood ratios were calculated for PSC-17.Results Most subjects aged 6-9 years (83%). Boys out numbered girls. Emotional and behavior problems detected by CBCL and PSC-17 were identified in 28% and 22% subjects, respectively. The most common problem was internalization (withdrawal, somatic complaints, anxiety/depression). The PSC-17 had sensitivity and specificity of 69.2% and 95.6% respectively. Positive and negative predictive values were 85.7% and 89%, whereas positive and negative likelihood ratios were 15.7 and 0.32.Conclusions The prevalence of emotional and behavior problems detected using CBCL and PSC-17 in obese children was 28% and 22%, respectively. The PSC-17 has moderate sensitivity to screen emotional and behavior problem in obese children.[Paediatr Indones. 2010;50:42-8].

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