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Paediatrica Indonesiana
ISSN : 00309311     EISSN : 2338476X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
Paediatrica Indonesiana is a medical journal devoted to the health, in a broad sense, affecting fetuses, infants, children, and adolescents, belonged to the Indonesian Pediatric Society. Its publications are directed to pediatricians and other medical practitioners or researchers at all levels of health practice throughout the world.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 7 Documents
Search results for , issue "Vol 50 No 2 (2010): March 2010" : 7 Documents clear
EFFECTS OF IRON AND ZINC FORTIFIED MILK SUPPLEMENTATION ON WORKING MEMORY OF UNDERWEIGHT POOR-URBAN SCHOOL CHILDREN: A RANDOMIZED DOUBLE BLIND CONTROLLED TRIAL Nugroho, Hari Wahyu; Lestari, Endang Dewi; Salimo, Harsono; Dewi, Mayasari; Adhim, Zusta'in Noor; Lestarina, Leilani
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 50 No 2 (2010): March 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (98.838 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi50.2.2010.92-95

Abstract

Background Undernutrition associated micronutrientdeficiencies in children are still prevalent in most developingcountries. Iron and zinc deficiencies are the most commonmicronutrient deficiency globally, which significantly contributedeficits in cognitive function. Fortification with iron and zinc hasproven successfully in reducing certain cognitive impairmentslike memory.Objective To determine the effects of milk fortified with iron andzinc on memory of underweight poor-urban schoolchildren.Methods A double blind randomized controlled trial wasconducted on 218 underweight poor-urban schoolchildren aged7-9 years old; 113 children were supplemented twice daily with27 gram of milk fortified with iron pyrophosphate (12.15 mg) andzinc sulfate (4.4 mg) for three months, 105 children served ascontrols. Anthropometry measured including bodyweight, height,sitting height and middle upper arm circumference. Memory wasmeasured using digit span backward test in Wechsler IntelligenceScales III. Statistical analyses were performed with SPSS forWindows, version 11.0.Results Baseline data of digit span backward score in iron andzinc group was 2.4 (SD 1.2), and control group was 3.0 (SD 1.8).After intervention, mean digit span backward score in iron andzinc group was 3 .1 (SD 1.2) and in control group 3.0 (SD 1.3).There was no improvement digit span backward score in controlgroup after intervention, compared with 0.7 point improvementin iron and zinc group (P=0.009).Conclusion Milk fortified with iron and zinc improves workingmemory of underweight poor-urban schoolchildren.
CHANGE OF IONIZED CALCIUM LEVEL IN THE FIRST 48 HOURS OF AGE OF PRETERM NEWBORNS ADMINISTERED WITH TWO DIFFERENT DOSAGES OF INTRAVENOUS CALCIUM GLUCONATE Wibowo, Anton; Sambas, Dedi Rachmadi; Sukadi, Abdurachman
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 50 No 2 (2010): March 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (127.08 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi50.2.2010.96-100

Abstract

Background Physiologically, serum calcium level declines till nadirin a few hours after birth and continues for 24-48 hours. No studyperformed in order to know the alteration ofionized calcium levelof newborn in the first 48 hours of age. The sick newborn musthave parenteral calcium to avoid hypocalcemia but there is stillno agreement about the dose.Objective To determine the change of ionized calcium level inthe first 48 hours of age of preterm newborns administered withperipheral drip intravenous 10% calcium gluconate of2.6 mIJkg/day and 5 mUkg/day.Methods An open labeled randomized controlled clinical trialwas performed between April and June 2009. After birth bloodspecimen of preterms was obtained for leukocyte, platelet,magnesium, phosphorous, and ionized calcium measurements.Subjects received either 2.6 mL/kg/day or 5 mL/kg/day ofperipheral drip intravenous 10% calcium gluconate immediatelyafter birth for 48 hours. Blood specimens was obtained again on48 hours of age for ionized calcium. This study were analyzedusing repeated measures analysis of varians.Results Forty preterm newborns (20 subjects each group) wereanalyzed. There was no statistical difference between bothdoses (Factor-A) on 48 hours ionized calcium level (P=0.33)and ionized calcium level alteration based on time (Factor-B)(P=0.20). Interaction between both factors was significantlydifferent (P=0.035).Conclusion Ionized calcium level in 48 hours of age of pretermnewborn administered with both doses of 10% calcium gluconate isnot different but dose of2.6 mL/kg/day yields physiologic alterationof ionized calcium level compared with 5 mL/kg/day.
COMPARISON OF THE EFFICACY OF ARTEMETHER-LUMEFANTRINE VS. ARTESUNATE PLUS SULFADOXINE-PYRIMETHAMINE IN CHILDREN WITH UNCOMPLICATED FALCIPARUM MALARIA Rachmawati, Rachmawati; Rampengan, Novie H; Tatura, Suryadi N N; Rampengan, Tonny H
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 50 No 2 (2010): March 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (108.431 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi50.2.2010.113-7

Abstract

Background World Health Organization (WHO) has recommendedthat countries with drug resistant malaria problem usecombination therapies, especially artemisinin-based combinationtherapy (ACT). However, there is limited information on theefficacy of ACT in North Sulawesi.Objective To compare the efficacy of artemether-lumefanttine andartesunate plus sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP).Methods This was a randomized experimental study, conducted inProf. Dr. R. D. Kandou General Hospital, Manado from Januaryuntil July 2009. There were 42 patients aged less than 13 yearstreated with artemether-lumefanttine and artesunate plus SP. Bodytemperature, parasite and gametocyte count were recorded everyday until day 7 and follow-up reviews were done on day 14 and28.Results Fever clearance time showed a significant differencebetween artemether-lumefanttine group (median 27 hours) andartesunate plus SP group (median 18 hours), P<0.05). There wasno significant difference in parasite clearance time (P>0.05) andgame tocyte clearance time (P > 0. 05) . The 28 day cure rate were100% in the two groups. No side effect was found.Conclusion Both artemether-lumefanttine and artesunate plus SPcombination are effective and safe for the treatment of falciparummalaria in children.
MUSCULAR VENTRICULAR SEPTAL DEFECT CLOSURE WITH GIANTURCO COIL AT SOETOMO HOSPITAL (A CASE REPORT) Utamayasa, Alit; Ontoseno, Teddy; Rahman, Mahrus A; Yoanna, Vinny; Herdyanto, Rio
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 50 No 2 (2010): March 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (277.242 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi50.2.2010.118-124

Abstract

Ventricular septal defect (VSD) is the mostcommon congenital heart disease (CHD)in children.1'2 It occurs in 1.5 to 3.5 of1,000 live births and constitutes 20% ofcongenital cardiac defects.1 The VSD may be small,medium or large and is classified based on its locationin the interventricular septum. There are four types ofVSD, i.e., perimembranous (80% ofVSDs), musculartype (5% to 20%) inlet or AV canal type (8%), andfinally, subpulmonary (5% to 7%).1-4 When multiplemuscular defects are seen, it is often referred to as"Swiss-cheese" type of VSD. 1?2The management strategies, which consist ofmedical, surgical and intervention techniques, depend toa large degree on the size of the VSD.1-4 Approximately40% of VSDs spontaneously and completely closed,with closure rates approaching 80-90% by age 2 years.2Indication ofVSD closure are symptoms of heart failure,left heart chambers overload and history of endocarditis.The surgical approach is considered gold standard butit is associated with morbidity and mortality, high cost,patient discomfort, sternostomy and skin scar.3 Since1988, percutaneous techniques have been conductedin order to reduce those drawbacks of surgery. Morerecently, percutaneous techniques and devices havebeen developed specifically for closure of muscularVSD (m VSD) and perimembranous VSD (pm VSD)using either the Rashkind double umbrella, the BardClamshell, the Button device, theAmplatzer septal, duct118 ? Paediatr lrulones, Vol. 50, No. 2, March 2010or muscular VSD occluder, or the Gianturco coils.3AGianturco coils have been widely used to closeunwanted vascular communications and small- tomoderate- sized patent ductus arteriosus, withexcellent closure rates. In 1999, Latiff et al successfullyused this coil to close multiple muscular VSDs in a10-month old boy. Thus, percutaneuos closure ofVSDs using Gianturco coils is a feasible, reasonablealternative to surgery.5'6 We report a case of fouryear-old girl with muscular VSD who underwentcardiac catheterization and transcatheter closure withGianturo coil in Dr. Soetomo Hospital, Surabaya.
COMPARISON OF BONE AGE IN SMALL-FOR-GESTATIONALAGE CHILDREN VS APPROPRIATE-FOR-GETATIONAL-AGE CHILDREN Edward, Lionardus; Effendi, Sjarif Hidajat; Setiabudi, Djatnika
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 50 No 2 (2010): March 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (209.18 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi50.2.2010.73-9

Abstract

BackgroundAbout 10-15% small-for-gestational-age children are in higher risk for having linear growth retardation due to growth hormone-insulin like growth factor 1 axis defect (GH-IGF 1) which causes bone age delay.ObjectivesTo compare bone age in 24-36 month old children born small-for-gestational-age (SGA) to that in children born appropriate-for-gestational-age (AGA).MethodsA cross-sectional study was conducted in Hasan Sadikin General Hospital, Bandung, from January to April 2009.Subjects consisted of50 healthy children of 24-36 months old (25 children born at term, SGA, 25 children born at term, AGA). We compared the appropriateness and delay of bone age between the two groups. ResultsMean bone age in the SGA group was 20.8 (SD 7.7) months, and in the AGA group was 25.7 (SD 7.1) months (P=0.022). Mean bone age deficit was -10.5 (6.5) months in the SGA group and -5.5 (SD 5.7) months in the AGA group (P=0.009). The prevalence ratio was 1.77 (95% CI: 1.19?2.62). Bone age delay was found to be higher in children born SGA than that in children of the other group (23 vs 13). On the contrary, appropriate bone age was found more in children born AGA (12 vs 2) (P=0.002).Conclusion Bone age delay in 24-36 months old children born small-for-gestational-age was found to be higher than in those born appropriate-for-gestational-age.
RISK FACTORS FOR NON-OPTIMAL BREASTFEEDING PRACTICES IN LOW BIRTH WEIGHT INFANTS Haksari, Ekawaty L; Wandita, Setya; Yustivani, Yustivani
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 50 No 2 (2010): March 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (108.601 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi50.2.2010.86-91

Abstract

Background Low birth weight infants are ongoing problems sincethey are likely to have high risks of morbidity, mortality andfeeding problems. American Academy of Pediatrics recommendsbreastfeeding practice for infants with low birth weight, yet someproblems have occured.Objective To determine risk factors for non-optimal breastfeedingpractices in low birth weight infants.Methods In this historical cohort study we included mothers with6-month-old infants, single birth with weight of2000-2499 gramsand the pregnancy period of 2:: 34 weeks, and excluded motherswith infants who had a major congenital disorder, labioschizis,labiognatopalatoschizis, or history of admission in NICU. Datawere collected using standard longitudinal surveillance form forbreastfeeding mothers. Analyses were performed using chi-squaretest and logistic regression.Results The percentage of low birth weight infants breastfedoptimally were 42.7%. Working mothers presented the highestrisk for non-optimal breastfeeding. The onset of lactation formore than 6 hours was the second factor (81.8%). The resultsof multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that motherswho worked (RR 2.79; 95% CI 1.84 to 4.23) and onset lactationof more than 6 hours (RR 2.34; 95% CI 1.57 to 3.50) were therisk factors for non-optimal breastfeeding practices in low birthweight infants.Conclusion Mother's working status and onset of lactationfor more than 6 hours were the risk factors for non-optimalbreastfeeding in low birth weight infants.
Comparison of the accuracy of body temperature measurements with temporal artery thermometer and axillary mercury thermometer in term newborns Gunawan, Markus; Soetjiningsih, Soetjiningsih; Kardana, I Made
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 50 No 2 (2010): March 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (171.852 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi50.2.2010.67-72

Abstract

AbstractBackground Rectal mercury thermometer (RT) has beenconsidered to be a clinical thermometer that measures bodytemperature close to core temperature. Unfortunately it is relativelyuncomfortable to the patient. Axillary mercury thermometer (AT)is a relatively safe method, but time consuming and its accuracyhas been questioned. Temporal artery thermometer (TAT) isrelatively a new method that can measure body temperaturefaster, and well tolerated.Objective To compare the accuracy of temperature measurementbetween TAT and AT in neonates.Methods Cross-sectional analytic study was conducted atNeonatology Division at Sanglah Hospital, Denpasar. Every healthyterm newborn who met the criteria were measured their bodytemperature by using three kinds of thermometer consecutively. Thelimits of agreement, correlation and linear regression analysis weredone to find TAT and AT’s agreement and correlation to RT.Results One hundred and thirty four newborns were enrolledin this study. TAT had a better agreement to RT with the mean????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????and RT with correlation coefficient ????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????Conclusion TAT is more accurate than AT for body temperaturemeasurement in the healthy term newborns. [Paediatr Indones.2010;50:67-72].

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