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Paediatrica Indonesiana
ISSN : 00309311     EISSN : 2338476X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
Paediatrica Indonesiana is a medical journal devoted to the health, in a broad sense, affecting fetuses, infants, children, and adolescents, belonged to the Indonesian Pediatric Society. Its publications are directed to pediatricians and other medical practitioners or researchers at all levels of health practice throughout the world.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 7 Documents
Search results for , issue "Vol 50 No 4 (2010): July 2010" : 7 Documents clear
PEDIATRIC LOGISTIC ORGAN DYSFUNCTION (PELOD) SCORE AS PROGNOSIS OF MULTIPLE ORGAN FAILURE IN SEPSIS Hendra, Hendra; Runtunuwu, Ari Lukas; Manoppo, Jeanette Irene Chistie
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 50 No 4 (2010): July 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (317.565 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi50.4.2010.226-31

Abstract

Background Sepsis is an emergency event that often found inpediatric intensive care unit. If this condition is not early detectedand promptly treated, severe complications including septic shockand multiple organ failure may result that can end up as death.Objective To discover alternative measurement as a prognosis ofmultiple organ failure in sepsis.Methods This cross sectional study was conducted in 37 patientsdiagnosed as sepsis. The age of the patients were 1 month until 13years and the patients were hospitalized in child health departmentof R. D. Kandou Hospital during June 2009 ? September 2009.Result Bronchopneumonia (18) was the most commoninfection source, followed by gastroenteritis (11), encephalitis(6) and meningitis (2). The bacteria which is found was Proteusmirabilis (5), Citrobacter difersus (5), Staphylococcus aureus (3),Escherichia coli (2) and Acinetobacter baumannii (1). There wasno significant difference in gender distribution, nutrition statusand blood culture between both groups. Laboratory findings andclinical manifestations which included white blood cell (WBC)> 10.000/?L (34), platelet count > 150.000 (27) and bodytemperature 38oC ? 39oC (20). There was a correlation betweenPELOD score and multiple organ failure (P=0.02). A higherPELOD score will increase opportunity to get multiple organfailure. In patient with organ failure more than two, PELODscore 0-10 (9 patients), score 11-20 (7 patients), score 21-30 (8patients), and score 31-40 (1 patient).Conclusion There was a correlation between PELOD score andmultiple organ failure in patient with sepsis. A higher PELODscore will increase opportunity to get multiple organ failure.
THE OCCURRENCE AND IS FACTORS OF TUBERCULOSIS IN CHILDREN WITH CLOSE CONTACT TO ADULT LUNG TUBERCULOSIS Walakandou, Ladylove R.; Umboh, Adrian; Wahani, Audrey
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 50 No 4 (2010): July 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (302.21 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi50.4.2010.232-8

Abstract

Background Tuberculosis (TB) in is children different from TB in adults in terms of the difficulty in making prompt diagnosis, the more progressive course of disease and the high-risk for the occurrence of disseminated TB. Transmission of TB in children mostly originates from adults, which the biggest risk is the index case with positive sputum smear.Objective To find out the incidence of TB in children who have close contact with adult TB patients and to determine some risk factors for the development of childhood TB.Method This cross-sectional study was conducted between March to July 2009. We studied children aged less than 5 years old with close contact, living in the same house with adult TB patients. The diagnosis of TB was made based on National TB scoring system for children.Results Of the 50 children, we obtained 17 (34%) positive children with TB after going through with national TB scoring system for children. There was a significant relationship between AFB positive sputum, passive smokers and residential density (overcrowding), but there was no significant relationship between age, nutritional status, gender of the contact source, and family income per month.Conclusion Only the positive sputum smear has a significant correlation associated with the occurrence of TB in children who have close contact with adult TB patients.
GIANT BRAIN ANEURYSM IN A TWO–YEAR–OLD GIRL G, Prastiya Indra; Kusumawardani, Hapsari; Saharso, Darto
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 50 No 4 (2010): July 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1128.316 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi50.4.2010.252-8

Abstract

Brain aneurysm is an abnormal outward bulging of one of the brain arteries. Brain aneurysms are often discovered when they rupture, causing bleeding into the brain or the space surrounding the brain called the subarachnoid space. This subarachnoid hemorrhage can lead to hemorrhagic stroke, brain damage and death.1The aneurysm can present in all ages, but mainly after 50 year of age (ages 35 ? 60), and exists a greater predisposition in females, with a ratio 3:2.2 Intracranial aneurysms in children are rare. About 0.5-4.6% of all aneurysms in children distinctly differ from adult, especially in male (2:1 to 3:1).3,4,5,6These injuries are located mainly in any cerebral artery specifically in those related to the well-known Circles of Willis such as internal carotid, middle cerebral and anterior cerebral artery as well as anterior communicating artery that corresponds to anterior circulatory circuit. In the posterior region they can be observed above the posterior cerebral artery, vertebral and basilar arteries, mainly. Aneurysm in children is mostly located at the bifurcation of ICA or vertebra-basilar artery posterior circulation, yet disproportionately with high incidence of posterior circulation aneurysm (40-50%) and of giant aneurysm (30-45%)
CARBON DIOXIDE TENSION AS A REFLECTION OF DIFFERENT RESPIRATORY RATES AND CHEST X-RAY FEATURES IN CHILDREN WITH COMMUNITY ACQUIRED PNEMONIA Iskandar, Deddy; Rahajoe, Nastiti Noenoeng; Rahajoe, Noenoeng; Boediman, Imam
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 50 No 4 (2010): July 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (551.229 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi50.4.2010.207-13

Abstract

Background Diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is often made based on clinical signs and symptoms as well as laboratory and radiographic tests. Several laboratory tests including blood gas analysis (BGA) can be helpful in establishing the diagnosis. The single most direct and useful BGA is the arterial carbon dioxide tension (PCO2). It directly reflects the adequacy of alveolar ventilation and indirectly could reflect the severity of illness.Objective To determine the differences of clinical signs and chest X-ray features in hospitalized CAP children with low PCO2 level and normal to high PCO2 level.Methods Patients with CAP in pediatric wards of Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital who fulfilled the inclusion criteria were enrolled between July 2009 and November 2009. Patients were categorized as group with low PCO2 level (<35 mmHg) and group with normal to high PCO2 level (? 35mmHg). All data, including clinical signs, laboratory results, and radiologic features on admissions were compared between groups.Results Thirty patients were enrolled; 20 patients belonged to low PCO2 level group and 10 patients belonged to normal-high PCO2 level group. Group with low PCO2 had significantly lower respiratory rate (P = 0.047), higher blood pH level (P = 0.044), and better chest X-ray features (P = 0.010) on admission compared to group with normal to high PCO2 level.Conclusion Low PCO2 level reflects better alveolar ventilation in children with CAP as described by lower respiratory rate and better chest X-ray features.
THE ROLE OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY ON CARDIOVASCULAR RISK FACTORS IN ADOLESCENTS Insani, Nadia Dwi; Putra, Sukman Tulus; Firmansyah, Agus
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 50 No 4 (2010): July 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (279.573 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi50.4.2010.220-5

Abstract

Background Cardiovascular diseases remain the leading cause of death worldwide. Atherosclerotic process increases rapidly during adolescence. Physical activity is considered important in this period to modify cardiovascular risk factors, thus preventing disease in the future.Objective To determine whether different physical activity status in adolescence can influence body mass index (BMBMI), waist-to-hip ratio, blood pressure (BP), and blood lipid profile.Methods This was a cross-sectional descriptive study, conducted from December 2009 to January 2010. Adolescents who fulfilled the study criteria were classified into high and low physical activity category. Further examination including body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio, blood pressure, and blood lipid profile were performed.Results Adolescents with high physical activity had higher, but statistically insignificant, BMBMI compared to adolescents in the P=0.493] and significantly lower waist-to-hip ratio [0.80 (range 0.73-0.9) vs.. 0.82 (range 0.7-0.9), P=0.019]. Difference in BP was not statistically significant between both groups [diastolic BP (70 (range 60-90) mmHg vs. 70 (range 60-90) mmHg, P=0.148; systolic BP 100 (range 90-130) mmHg vs. 100 (range 90-140) mmHg, P=0.228)]. Blood lipid examination in the high activity group showed significantly higher HDL cholesterol and lower triglyceride compared to the low activity group [HDL 59.8 (SD 11.8) mg/dL vs. 54.7 (SD 8.9) mg/dL; p=0.044; triglyceride: 60 (range 32-203) mmHg vs. 82 (range 37-198) mmHg, P=0.014]. Total and LDL cholesterol [total cholesterol 169.8 (SD 28.6) mmHg vs. 181.2 (SD 30.8) mmHg, P=0.107; LDL 103.6 (SD 26.8) mmHg vs. 114.1 (SD 27.3) mmHg, P=0.100] were lower in the high activity group but not statistically different in both groups.Conclusions Adolescents with high physical activity show less cardiovascular risk factors compared to those in the low physical activity group.
COMPARISONS OF BONE MINERAL DENSITY IN STEROID DEPENDENT, FREQUENT RELAPSE, AND INFREQUENT RELAPSE NEPHROTIC SYNDROME CHILDREN Nurmala, Lies Dewi; Tambunan, Taralan; Amir, Idham
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 50 No 4 (2010): July 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (326.355 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi50.4.2010.193-8

Abstract

Background Children with nephrotic syndrome, especially those with steroid dependent and frequent relapse are at greater risk of reduced bone mineral density (BMD).Objective To determine bone mineral density (BMD) in steroid dependent and frequent relapse compared to infrequent relapse nephrotic syndrome.Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study at the Child Health Department, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, from August until November 2009. Subjects were 5 to 18 year-old children with steroid dependent nephrotic syndrome (SDNS), frequent relapsenephrotic syndrome (FRNS), or infrequent relapse nephrotic syndrome (IRNS). Ionized calcium level, vitamin 25(OH)D3 level, and BMD were measured us ng dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA).Results 11 SDNS and 11 FRNS cbildren (group I) were compared with 22 IRNS children (Group II). Children of SDNS and FRNS had significantly longer duration of illness, more relapses, longer steroid therapy duration, and greater cumulative steroid dose compared to group 11 (IRNS). There were no differences between  the two groups with regard to mean ionized calcium level and vitamin 25(OH)D3 level. Children in group I had lower z-scores compared to group lI, but the difference was not statistically significant r mean (SD) -1.182 (1.21) vs. -0.795 (1.25), P=0.305]. Subgroup analysis showed that SDNS children had lower z-scores than FRNS [-1.791 (1.17) vs. -0.57 (0.94), P=0.019] and IRNS [-1.791 (1.17) vs. -0.795 (1.25), P=O.026].Conclusion Children with SDNS have significantly lower BMD z-scores compared to those with FRNS and IRNS.
RAPID IMPROVEMENT OF RESPIRATORY QUALITY IN ASTHMATIC CHILDREN AFTER "ASSISTED DRAINAGE" THERAPY Utomo, Haryono; Harsono, Ariyanto
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 50 No 4 (2010): July 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (489.55 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi50.4.2010.199-206

Abstract

Background  Whilst current asthma management is well-developed, there are still 5-10% uncontrolled asthma patients with unknown etiologies. However, its connection with oral focal infection is still uncertain. Therefore, a collaborated research for asthma management was conducted by pediatricians and dental practitioners. Within minutes after the "assisted drainage" therapy, a modification of healing root planning procedure, there is rapid improvement of respiratory function, ie., forced expiratory-volume one second (FEV1) in asthmatic children. This quick response usually achieved by oral inhalation.Objective To investigate the effectiveness of the assisted drainage therapy in the improvement of respiratory quality.Methods Fifteen asthmatic children were subjected to a longitudinal study for two weeks. In tbe first week they were instructed for al lergen avoidance only and the fOllowing one week was combined with tbe assisted drainage therapy, followed by  mental health education and dental plaque control therapy. Each s'ubject was af'sef'sed for respiratory quality with a computerized spirometer and blood sampling test. Paired t-test analysis was used for statistical analysis.Results Assisted drainage therapy was performed, within minutes FEV1 increased significantly (P= 0.001). Additionally, there were significant differences serum histamine (P= 0,001) pre and post treatment.Conclusions The assisted drainage therapy is effective as an adjuvant therapy for mild persistent asthma in children.

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