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Paediatrica Indonesiana
ISSN : 00309311     EISSN : 2338476X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
Paediatrica Indonesiana is a medical journal devoted to the health, in a broad sense, affecting fetuses, infants, children, and adolescents, belonged to the Indonesian Pediatric Society. Its publications are directed to pediatricians and other medical practitioners or researchers at all levels of health practice throughout the world.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 6 Documents
Search results for , issue "Vol 54 No 6 (2014): November 2014" : 6 Documents clear
IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME AND ITS ASSOCIATED FACTORS IN ADOLESCENTS Fillekes, Lara; Prayogo, Ari; Alatas, Fatima Safira; Hegar, Badriul
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 54 No 6 (2014): November 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (110.794 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi54.6.2014.344-50

Abstract

Background Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a commonfunctional gastrointestinal disorder. Increasing prevalences havebeen reported in Asian adolescent populations, however, therehave been few reports on Indonesian adolescents.Objective To investigate the prevalence of IBS and associatedfactors among adolescents in Jakarta.Methods This cross-sectional study included senior high schoolstudents in a district of Jakarta. Students were asked to fillquestionnaires based on the Rome III criteria for IBS. They werethen divided into groups: those with IBS and those without IBS,for the purposes of comparison.Results Out of 232 adolescents (145 females and 87 males) withmean age of 16.06 (SD 0.91) years, 14 (6.0%) had IBS. Elevenout of 14 adolescents with IBS reported upper abdominal painas well as periumbilical/lower abdominal pain. Irritable bowelsyndrome was not associated with socioeconomic status, food anddrink habits, the use of antibiotics, or scolding as a parental formof discipline. However, a significant higher proportion in the useof corporal punishment was found in IBS adolescents comparedto the non-IBS (P=0.034). In addition, stress related to scolding,as a parental form of discipline was more likely to be found in theIBS group than in the non-IBS group (P=0.019).Conclusion The prevalence of IBS among adolescents in Jakartais 6%, which is lower compared to those of other Asian countries.Corporal punishment at home and stress related to scolding athome are found to be associated with IBS.
THE EFFECT OF REGULAR AEROBIC EXERCISE ON URINARY BRAIN-DERIVED NEUROTROPHIC FACTOR IN CHILDREN Fediani, Yunita; Dewi, Masayu Rita; Irfannuddin, Muhammad; Saleh, Masagus Irsan; Dhaini, Safri
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 54 No 6 (2014): November 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (222.254 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi54.6.2014.351-7

Abstract

Background Nervous system development in early lifeinfluences the quality of cognitive ability during adulthood.Neuronal development and neurogenesis are highly influencedby neurotrophins. The most active neurotrophin is brain-derivedneurotrophic factor (BDNF). Physical activity has a positiveeffect on cognitive function. However, few experimental studieshave been done on children to assess the effect of aerobic regularexercise on BDNF levels.Objective To assess the effect of regular aerobic exercise onurinary BDNF levels in children.Methods This clinical study was performed in 67 children aged6-8 years in Palembang. The intervention group (n=34) engagedin aerobic gymnastics three times per week for 8 weeks, while thecontrol group (n=33) engaged in gymnastic only once per week.Measurements of urinary BDNF were performed on both groupsbefore and after intervention. Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon ranktests were used to analyze the differences between groups.Results There was no difference in urinary BDNF levels betweenthe two groups prior to the intervention. After intervention,the mean urinary BDNF levels were significantly higher in theintervention group than in the control group, 230.2 (SD 264.4)pg/mL vs. 88.0 (SD 35.4) pg/mL, respectively (P=0.027). We alsofound that engaging in aerobic gymnastics significantly increasedurinary BDNF levels from baseline in both groups (P=0.001).Conclusion Regular aerobic exercise can increase urinary BDNFlevels and potentially improve cognitive function. Aerobic exerciseshould be a routine activity in school curriculums in combinationwith the learning process to improve children?s cognitive ability.
CORRELATION BETWEEN NUCLEATED RED BLOOD CELLS AND PULSE OXYGEN SATURATION IN NEONATAL ASPHYXIA Sarosa, Gatot Irawan; Rahmadi, Farid A.; Kosim, Muhammad Sholeh; Rahardjani, Kamilah B.
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 54 No 6 (2014): November 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (140.83 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi54.6.2014.314-7

Abstract

Background Neonatal asphyxia is the major cause of neonatal death at a rate of approximately 23%. The incidence of asphyxia is higher in developing countries, due to limited availability of perinatology facilities. Hypoxia due to asphyxia is characterized by low pulse oxygen saturation (Sp02), which basic health care facilities are unable to monitor. The number ofnucleated red blood cells (nRBCs) in asphyxia increases in order to compensate for the hypoxia. Few studies have reported on nRBCs as they relate to pulse oxygen saturation in neonatal asphyxia. Objective To assess for a correlation between nRBCs and pulse oxygen saturation in neonatal asphyxia. Methods In this cross-sectional study, asphyxia was assessed by way of Apgar scores; pulse oxygen saturation was monitored by pulse oximetry; and nRBCs were determined by blood smears. Statistical analysis used was Spearman's test. Results Subjects were 41 neonates with asphyxia, 15 of whom had 5th minute Apgar scores S 6. Subjects with Apgar scores S 6 had significantly higher umbilical venous nRBC counts [20.0 (SD 13.09) /100 white blood cell] than subjects with Apgar score > 6 [8.81 (SD 8.71) /100 white blood cell] ; (P = 0.004). Subjects with Apgar S 6 had significantly lower 5th minute Sp02 values [76.46 (SD 6.17) %] than subjects with Apgar scores > 6 [87.03 (SD 6.29)]; (P < 0.0001). Spearmans' test revealed a significant correlation between higher nRBC counts and lower pulse oxygen saturation (r = -0.804; P<0.0001) . Conclusion In asphyxia neonatorum there is a correlation between umbilical vein nRBC counts and the 5th minute Sp02. As such, we recommend using nRBC examinations to predict pulse oxygen saturation as a means to assess the severity ofhypoxia in peripheral areas where pulse oximetry machines may be unavailable.
IMPACT OF GROWTH HORMONE TREATMENT ON CHILDREN’S HEIGHT Rochmah, Nur; Faizi, Muhammad
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 54 No 6 (2014): November 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (95.934 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi54.6.2014.318-23

Abstract

Background The use of growth hormone (GH) is a routine treatment for growth hormone deficiency (GHD), small for gestational age (SGA), and Turner syndrome (TS). During the treatment, height measurement at regular intervals is a vital step to assess success. To date, there have been no previous studies on GH treatment in Dr. Soetomo Hospital, Surabaya, the referral hospital in East Indonesia. Objective To compare body height between pre- and post-growth hormone treatment in pediatric patients. Method This study was a non-randomized, pre-post clinical trial performed at Dr. Soetomo Hospital, Surabaya. The prospective cohort was accessed during January 2008-June 2013. The inclusion criteria was GH treatment for more than 3 months.Clinical data on GH treatment, including diagnosis, age, height pre-and post-treatment, height gain, duration of treatment, and parental satisfaction were collected. Two-tailed, paired T-test and Pearson?s test were used for statistical analyses. Result Nineteen patients underwent GH treatment during the study period, but only twelve patients had complete data and were included in the study. Eight subjects were female. Subjects? meanage was 11 (range 8-15) years. Nine patients had GHD, 2 had TS, and 1 had SGA. Mean pre-treatment height was 121.05 cm, while mean post-treatment height was 130.5 cm. Mean duration of treatment was 10.5 (range 3-30) months. Mean height gain was 0.8 cm/month in GHD and SGA cases, and 0.78 cm/month for the TS cases. Eleven parents reported satisfaction with the results of GH treatment in their children. There is significant diffrent between pre- and post-treatment (P=0.001). Pearson?s correlation test (r=0.90) revealed a strong correlation between growth hormone treatment and height gain. Conclusion Growth hormone treatment has impact on heights in GH defficiency, Turner syndrome, and small for gestational age.
PREDICTORS OF MORTALITY IN CHILDREN WITH LUPUS NEPHRITIS Oktadianto, Lukman; Prasetyo, Risky Vitria; Soemyarso, Ninik Asmaningsih; Noer, Mohammad Sjaifullah
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 54 No 6 (2014): November 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (102.854 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi54.6.2014.338-43

Abstract

Background Renal involvement during the clinical course ofsystemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is generally considered to bethe most important factor influencing disease prognosis in termsof morbidity and mortality. Various factors have been reported toinfluence the prognosis of lupus nephritis (LN).Objective To analyze clinical signs and laboratory parameters thatmight serve as predictors associated with mortality in pediatricLN.Methods Retrospectively, medical records of children with LNat Soetomo Hospital from 1998 to 2011 were studied. Diagnosisof SLE was based on Revised American Rheumatism Associationcritera, while patients with clinical manifestations of hypertension,abnormal urinalysis, and serum creatinin > 1 mg/dL wereconsidered as lupus nephritis. Cox proportional hazard modelingwas used to assess for associations of clinical signs and laboratoryparameters with mortality. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis wasused to assess the cumulative survival from the time of diagnosisto the outcome.Results There were 57 children with LN of whom 43 (75%) weregirls. The female-to-male ratio was 3:1. Subjects? mean age was 10.6(SD 6.87) years. The mean time of observation was 51 (SD 74.54)months and 23 (40%) children died. Age, gender, hypertension,hematuria, proteinuria, and anemia were not significant aspredictors for mortality. However, hypertensive crisis (HR=2.79;95%CI 1.16 to 6.75; P=0.02) and initial glomerular filtration rate(GFR) of <75 mL/min/1.73m2 (HR=3.01; 95%CI 1.23 to 7.34;P=0.01) were significant predictors of mortality in children with LN.The mean survival time of LN with hypertensive crisis and initialGFR <75 mL/min/1.73m2 was 36.9 (SD 12.17) months.Conclusion Hypertensive crisis and GFR <75 mL/min/1.73m2 aresignificant predictors of mortality in children with LN.
Hypertension, high-dose corticosteroids, and renal infiltration in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia Juliansen, Andry; Andriastuti, Murti; Pardede, Sudung; Sekartini, Rini
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 54 No 6 (2014): November 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (137.11 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi54.6.2014.372-6

Abstract

Background Hypertension is a rarely recognized complication of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The incidence of hypertension in ALL patients in Indonesia remains unknown, but the most common risk factors are corticosteroid use during induction-phase chemotherapy and renal leukemic infiltration. Objective To determine the incidence of hypertension in children with ALL, and to assess for associations of high-dose corticosteroids, renal infiltration, and hyperleukocytosis to hypertension. Methods This was a cross-sectional study involving 100 children aged 2-18 years. Subjects were newly diagnosed ALL patients and those underwent induction-phase chemotherapy in the Pediatric Ward or Outpatient Clinic at Cipto Mangunkusumo or Dharmais Hospitals. Results Hypertension occurred in 6 (10%) of 60 newly diagnosed ALL patients and 8 (20%) of 40 patients who had received high-dose corticosteroids, but the difference was not statistically significant (OR=2.25; 95%CI 0.72 to 7.07; P=0.239). Hypertension was reported in 8 of 29 subjects who received dexamethasone, but in none of the subjects who received prednisone. However, the difference in these subgroups was also not statistically significant. Renal enlargement was found in 1 of 14 hypertensive patients, but it was not associated with hypertension (OR=0.80; 95%CI 0.52 to 1.24; P=0.417). Hyperleukocytosis was also not associated with hypertension (OR= 0.79; 95% CI 0.20 to 3.11; P=1.000). Conclusion The incidence of hypertension in ALL patients was 14%. Hypertension is not associated with renal infiltration or hyperleukocytosis. Furthermore, hypertension is not associated with corticosteroid dose, though is found only in subjects who receive dexamethasone. [Paediatr Indones. 2014;54:372-6.].

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