cover
Contact Name
-
Contact Email
-
Phone
-
Journal Mail Official
-
Editorial Address
-
Location
Kota semarang,
Jawa tengah
INDONESIA
Paediatrica Indonesiana
ISSN : 00309311     EISSN : 2338476X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
Paediatrica Indonesiana is a medical journal devoted to the health, in a broad sense, affecting fetuses, infants, children, and adolescents, belonged to the Indonesian Pediatric Society. Its publications are directed to pediatricians and other medical practitioners or researchers at all levels of health practice throughout the world.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 9 Documents
Search results for , issue "Vol 59 No 1 (2019): January 2019" : 9 Documents clear
AGE AT MENARCHE AND EARLY MENARCHE AMONG HEALTHY ADOLESCENTS Moelyo, Annang Giri; Wulandari, Anindita; Imas, Oktania; Rahma, Ulfa Puspita; Hidayah, Nurul; Kesumaningtyas, Cempaka; Nur, Fadhilah Tia; Nugroho, Hari Wahyu
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 59 No 1 (2019): January 2019
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (264.554 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi59.1.2019.33-7

Abstract

Background Menarche is an important indicator of female adolescents? health and also population health. Age at menarche tends to decrease in many countries. Early menarche that defined from the lowest quartile of age at menarche, associated with some physical and psychological problems. Objective To determine the mean age at menarche, the prevalence of early menarche among healthy adolescents in Surakarta and its association to nutritional status. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in 5 schools (3 junior and 2 senior high schools) in Surakarta, Central Java, Indonesia, from September 2016 to March 2018, by consecutive sampling technique. We included menarched healthy female students whose parent provided informed consent and without consuming any routine medication. Data were derived from self-reported questionnaire and measurements of body weight; body height; and body mass index (BMI) by calculated based on weight/height2(kg/m2). Results Of 835 eligible subjects, the mean age at menarche was 12.0 (SD 1.1) years (range 8.8-15.1 years) and the prevalence of early menarche was 11.1%. The peak of age at menarche were at 11,12, and 13 years (24.3%, 36.2%, and 23.9%, respectively) and almost 99.04% of subjects had menarche at 14 years old. The proportion of early menarche between subjects birth 1997-2001 and 2002-2007 were 8.4% and 16.1%. Early menarche associated with overweight-obese in adolescents (odd ratio 2.14; 95%CI 1.21 to 3.76). Conclusion The mean age at menarche of healthy adolescents in Surakarta is younger than other previous studies in Indonesia. Early menarche was significantly a risk for overweight/obese in adolescents.
CLINICAL SPECTRUM AND OUTCOMES OF PEDIATRIC DIPHTHERIA Nawing, Herry D.; Pelupessy, Ninny Meutia; Alimadong, Herniati; Albar, Husein
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 59 No 1 (2019): January 2019
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (236.599 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi59.1.2019.38-43

Abstract

Background Although vaccination programs have succeeded in reducing the incidence of diphtheria, it remains a health problem in Asia, including Indonesia. Objective To investigate the clinical spectrum and outcomes of pediatric diphtheria in Wahidin Sudirohusodo Hospital. Methods This study was a retrospective review of childhood diphtheria medical records from January 2011 to December 2017 in Wahidin Sudirohusodo Hospital, Makassar, South Sulawesi. Recorded data consisted of age, gender, nutritional and immunization statuses, signs and symptoms, throat swab culture results, complications, and outcomes.    Results Of 28 subjects aged 9 months to 17.10 years, the majority were >5 years (57.1%) and male (60.7%). Subjects? mean age was 6.15 years and 82.1% of cases were well nourished. Overall, 85.7% had received complete immunizations, while 14.3% were not immunized, having received neither basic nor booster vaccines. The presenting manifestations were fever, pseudomembranes, and sore throat in all subjects, enlarged tonsils (78.57%), dysphagia (67.86%), cough (57.14%), headache (57.14%), hoarseness (67.86%), bull neck (25%), and myocarditis (14.3%). Most subjects had hospital stays of >10 days (67.9%). Mortality was 14.3%, usually in those admitted with a late, deteriorating condition and dying before getting optimal treatment. Poor outcome was significantly associated with the lack of basic or booster immunizations, poor nourishment, bull neck, myocarditis, and hospital stays < 5 days (P<0.05 for all).  Conclusion The clinical spectrum and outcomes of pediatric diphtheria in this study are relatively similar to reports from other hospitals. Mortality was mostly in patients who lack basic or booster immunizations, are poorly nourished, or have bull neck, myocarditis, or hospital stays < 5 days.
CORRELATION OF SERUM LEVEL OF ALBUMIN WITH PLATELET COUNT AND PLATELET AGGREGATION ASSESSED BY ADENOSINE DIPHOSPHATE AGONIST IN CHILDREN WITH NEPHROTIC SYNDROME Nainggolan, Andar Laura; Sudarwati, Sri; Hilmanto, Dany
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 59 No 1 (2019): January 2019
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (448.641 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi59.1.2019.7-12

Abstract

Background Nephrotic syndrome (NS) is the most common renal disease among children, and contributes to life-threatening complications such as thromboembolic disease. Platelets are considered to be important agents in thrombotic events among NS patients. The gold standard assessment for platelet aggregation is the use of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) agonist, however, it is expensive and not accessible in smaller health facilities. Thus, other thrombosis parameters are needed. Previous studies suggested that low albumin increased the risk of thrombosis in NS patients. Objective To assess for a possible correlation between albumin level and platelet count as well as platelet aggregation. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in children with nephrotic syndrome who were admitted to the Pediatric Nephrology Department in Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital, Bandung, West Java, from November 2017 to March 2018. Subjects were selected by consecutive sampling. Serum albumin, platelet count, and platelet aggregation were measured. Statistical analysis was conducted by Spearman?s test. Results A total of 32 patients participated in the study, with mean age of 109 (SD 7.4) months. Most subjects were male (56%). Subjects? mean serum albumin level was 2.06 (SD 1.23) g/dL; mean platelet count was 453,062.5 (SD 187,443.90)/mm3; and mean platelet aggregation values for ADP agonist concentrations of 10, 5, 2.5, and 1 mM were 86.8 (SD 8.63)%, 82.4 (SD 15.33)%, 66.6 (SD 24.90)%, 34.95 (SD 31.69)%, respectively. Partial correlation analysis revealed significant negative associations between albumin and platelet count as well as platelet aggregation assessed with 1 mM of ADP concentration (P<0.001), with Spearman correlation coefficients of -0.641 and -0.634, respectively. Conclusion Serum albumin level had a moderately negative correlation with platelet count and platelet aggregation value.
INTRINSIC RISK FACTORS FOR GROSS MOTOR DELAY IN CHILDREN AGED 6-24 MONTHS Hanrahan, Joanna Erin; Mangunatmadja, Irawan
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 59 No 1 (2019): January 2019
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (226.795 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi59.1.2019.27-32

Abstract

Background. Gross motor is one of the skill domain with the highest parental concern as mastering it determines the autonomy of a child. Several internal risk factors including perinatal asphyxia, prematurity, low birth weight, wide fontanelle, and microcephaly have been studied in predicting gross motor delay with varied results. This study is made to arrange a strategic intervention on the prevention of delayed development. Objective. To evaluate perinatal asphyxia, gestation age <37 weeks, birth weight <2500 grams, microcephaly, and wide fontanelle as predictors of gross motor delay in children aged 6-24 months. Methods. A case control study design was used. Data collection was conducted by direct assessment of gross motor skill and parents? interview in Cipto Mangunkusumo National Hospital and Anakku Clinic, South Jakarta. Children with gross motor delay were included in the case group and children with normal gross motor were included in the control group. Data was analyzed using bivariate and multivariate analysis with a statistical significance value of P<0.05 and 95% confidence intervals. Results. One hundred and twenty-six subjects were studied, with 63 children in the case group and 63 children in the control group. Baseline characteristics of subjects were similar between the two groups. Microcephaly and gestation age <37 weeks were predictors of gross motor delay [(aOR 4.613 (95% CI 95 2.023 to 10.521, P<0.001) and (aOR 3.668 (95% CI 1.153 to 11.673, P=0.028), respectively]. Conclusion. Microcephaly and gestation age <37 weeks are significant predictors of gross motor delay in children aged 6-24 months.
OVERWEIGHT, HYPERTENSION AND MICROALBUMINURIA IN URBAN AND RURAL BANGLADESHI SCHOOLCHILDREN Islam, Mohammad Majharul Islam; Benzamin, Mohammad; Roy, Ranjit Ranjan; Mamun, Abdullah Al; Ahmed, Muhammad Tanvir; Islam, Mohammad Tariqul; Ashraf, Rezwana; Karim, Rezaul; Hossen, Kamal; Biswas, Susmita; Khatun, Sufia
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 59 No 1 (2019): January 2019
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (288.799 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi59.1.2019.18-26

Abstract

Background The prevalence of childhood overweight and obesity has increased over the last two decades due to high caloric intake and decreased physical activity. The dramatic increase in the prevalence of overweight children occurred in conjunction with increasing prevalence of hypertension. Microalbuminuria is an early sign of damage to the kidney and cardiovascular system. Hypertensive, overweight children have an increased chance of microalbuminuria. Objectives To assess the prevalence of overweight, hypertension, and microalbuminuria in urban and rural school going children and contributing risk factors and associations. Methods This cross-sectional study was done in schoolchildren aged 6 to 16 years, from urban and rural areas, in Bangladesh, from September 2015 untill August 2016. Subjects? weights, heights, and blood pressures (BP) were measured. Overweight and hypertension (HTN) statuses were determined with age-appropriate standardized charts. Subjects were divided into overweight and normoweight groups to evaluate risk factors for overweight such as family history (F/H) of obesity, F/H of HTN, daily physical outdoor activities, and monthly family income by comparative analysis. All overweight children were divided into hypertensive and normotensive groups in order to compare their fasting lipid profiles, urine microalbumin, serum creatinine, and random blood sugar. Results A total of 976 schoolchildren from urban (471, 48.3%) and rural (505, 51.7%) areas were included. Overweight was observed in 22.3% of the urban group and in 8.1% of the rural group (P<0.001). Hypertension was observed in 24.7% of overweight children and in 2.5% of normal weight children (P<0.001).  Contributing risk factors for overweight were less physical outdoor activities, F/H of obesity, F/H of HTN, and higher family income (P<0.001). Microalbuminuria and random blood sugar were significantly increased in the overweight with hypertension group compared to the normotensive group (P <0.005). Conclusion Overweight is a health problem, noted especially in urban areas. Hypertension is also significantly increased in overweight children. Factors like F/H of hypertension, obesity, sedentary lifestyle, and higher socioeconomic status are significantly associated with overweight. Microalbuminuria and increased random blood sugar are also significantly higher observed in hypertensive overweight children compared to normotensive overweight children.
PREDICTORS OF MORTALITY IN CHILDREN WITH SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS Listiyono, Fanny; Murni, Indah K.; Sumadiono, Sumadiono; Satria, Cahya Dewi
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 59 No 1 (2019): January 2019
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (245.818 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi59.1.2019.1-6

Abstract

Background Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem chronic disease with a relatively high mortality rate in children, despite improvements in prognosis and survival rate over the past decade. Studies on the predictors of mortality in children with SLE, especially in low- and middle-income countries, are limited. Objective To determine the predictors of mortality of children with SLE. Methods This was case-control study using data from medical records of children with SLE at Dr. Sardjito Hospital, Yogyakarta, Indonesia, between 2009 and 2017. Subjects were children aged <18 years diagnosed with SLE. Cases were those who died within one year of diagnosis; the controls were those who were discharged alive. From subjects? medical records, we collected clinical data including age, sex, date of diagnosis, nutritional status, anti-dsDNA antibody, antinuclear antibody (ANA), hypertension, disease activity based on the Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) score, proteinuria, thrombocytopenia, mortality/survival outcome, date of death, cause of death, and clinical data including fever, seizures, antibiotic used, microbial culture outcomes, and infection-related diagnoses. We performed bivariate analysis of the association between predictor variables (SLEDAI score, proteinuria, infection, hypertension, and seizures) and mortality outcome (survival or death), followed by logistic regression analysis. Results Eighty-four patients with SLE were included, of which 72 were female.  Median age at diagnosis was 14 (range 4-18) years. Twenty-three patients (27%) died within one year after diagnosis. The most common causes of death were infection and renal failure in 8/23 and 7/23 subjects, respectively. On bivariate analysis, the variables significantly associated with mortality were hypertension (OR 3.34, 95%CI 1.22 to 9.14) and infection (OR 3.71; 95%CI 1.36 to 10.12). Seizures, proteinuria, and SLEDAI score were not found to be significantly associated with mortality. On logistic regression analysis, infection was the only significant predictor of mortality (OR 3.22; 95%CI 1.15 to 9.05). Conclusion Among the factors studied, infection is significantly associated with mortality in children with SLE.  
BABY GIRL WITH PENTALOGY OF CANTRELL: A CASE REPORT ON AN EXTREMELY RARE CONDITION Soewondo, Widiastuti; Suyono, Suyono; Prasodjo, Johannes Berchmans; Widjaja, Sri Lilijanti
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 59 No 1 (2019): January 2019
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (346.475 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi59.1.2019.51-4

Abstract

In 1958, Cantrell et al. described an extremely rare syndrome of congenital defects involving the abdominal wall, sternum, diaphragm, pericardium, and heart malformation.1 The incidence of pentalogy of Cantrell (POC) is one in 65,000 live births.1,2,3 Only one case was reported in Dr. Moewardi Public Hospital between 1999 and 2016. The exact etiology of this condition is unknown, but developmental failure of mesoderm at 4 weeks of gestational age may contribute to the condition.4 The prognosis depends on the degree of heart failure and the malformations that occur. Heart failure, arrhythmia, cardiac rupture, cardiac tamponade, endocarditis, and peripheral emboli are described as the main complications and causes of death.5,6 The aim of this report was to add to reference data about complete POC and the prognostic outcome.
ASSOCIATION BETWEEN LOW-GRADE CHRONIC INFLAMMATION WITH ADIPOCYTOKINES AND BODY FAT MASS IN SUPEROBESE MALE CHILDREN Hendarto, Aryono; Sastroasmoro, Sudigdo; Sjarif, Damayanti Rusli
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 59 No 1 (2019): January 2019
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (259.751 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi59.1.2019.13-7

Abstract

Background Obesity causes adipocytokines dysregulation and enhances the pro-inflammatory response. Low-grade chronic inflammation is related to cardiometabolic diseases. Objective To evaluate the status of low-grade chronic inflammation in pre-pubertal, obese boys and its potential correlation to adipocytokines and body fat mass. Methods This cross-sectional study included pre-pubertal, male, superobese children as the subjects. We determined obesity status using the CDC 2000 BMI-for-age chart. Body fat percentage was measured using bioelectric impedance analysis (BIA). Fasting blood specimens were collected to evaluate hsCRP, leptin, adiponectin, and TNF-? levels. Results Eighty subjects were recruited into this study, with a mean age of 6.9 years. Ten subjects (12.5%) had low-grade chronic inflammation (hsCRP level ? 1 mg/L). The levels of hsCRP was not correlated with leptin, adiponectin, and TNF-? levels. A weak, but significant correlation was observed between hsCRP level and body fat mass (r= +0.383; P<0.0001). The hsCRP level increased with increasing body fat mass, until it reached its peak at body fat mass of 28 kg. Beyond that point, hsCRP level was stable. Conclusion Low-grade chronic inflammation begins at a young age in obese children. The hsCRP level has a weak correlation with body fat mass, but no correlation with adipocytokine levels. Prevention and treatment of childhood obesity should be prioritized to prevent further cardiovascular and metabolic diseases.
PREDICTORS OF EARLY GROWTH FAILURE IN PRETERM, VERY LOW BIRTH WEIGHT INFANTS DURING HOSPITALIZATION Leksomono, Noviyani; Sutomo, Retno; Haksari, Ekawaty Lutfia
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 59 No 1 (2019): January 2019
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (255.487 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi59.1.2019.44-50

Abstract

Background Preterm, very low birth weight (VLBW) infants experience intrauterine nutritional deficits and perinatal comorbidities that may impair early growth parameters. Early growth failure has detrimental effects on later growth and neurodevelopment in childhood. Objective To analyze predictors of early growth failure in preterm, VLBW infants and differences in early growth parameters between small-for-gestational age (SGA) and appropriate-for-gestational age (AGA) infants. Methods This retrospective cohort study was conducted at Dr. Sardjito Hospital, Yogyakarta from 2011 to 2016. Subjects were preterm infants, with birth weights of 1,000-1,499 g. Twins, those who died during hospitalization, were discharged against medical advice, or had incomplete medical records were excluded. Adequate intrauterine growth was determined by the Lubchenco table criteria. Growth parameters and perinatal comorbidities were collected from medical records. Growth failure was defined as discharge weight less than 10th percentile of the Fenton growth curve. Bivariate and multivariate analysis were used to analyze potential predictive factors of early growth failure. Results Of 646 preterm, VLBW infants during the study period, 398 were excluded. Respiratory distress and SGA were predictors of early growth failure (AOR 6.94; 95%CI 2.93 to 16.42 and AOR 34.44; 95%CI 7.79 to 152.4, respectively). Mean weight velocities in SGA and AGA infants were not significantly different [16.5 (SD 5.9) and 17.5 (SD 5.3) g/kg/day, respectively; (P=0.25)]. Median time to regain, time to reach full feeding, and time to reach 120 kcal/kg/day were also not significantly different between SGA and AGA infants. Conclusions SGA and respiratory distress are predictors of early growth failure in preterm, VLBW infants during hospitalization. The SGA infants grow slower than AGA infants.

Page 1 of 1 | Total Record : 9


Filter by Year

2019 2019


Filter By Issues
All Issue Vol 60 No 3 (2020): May 2020 Vol 60 No 2 (2020): March 2020 Vol 60 No 1 (2020): January 2020 Vol 59 No 6 (2019): November 2019 Vol 59 No 5 (2019): September 2019 Vol 59 No 4 (2019): July 2019 Vol 59 No 3 (2019): May 2019 Vol 59 No 2 (2019): March 2019 Vol 59 No 1 (2019): January 2019 Vol 59 No 3 (2019): May 2019 Vol 59 No 2 (2019): March 2019 Vol 58 No 6 (2018): November 2018 Vol 58 No 5 (2018): September 2018 Vol 58 No 4 (2018): July 2018 Vol 58 No 3 (2018): May 2018 Vol 58 No 2 (2018): March 2018 Vol 58 No 1 (2018): January 2018 Vol 57 No 6 (2017): November 2017 Vol 57 No 5 (2017): September 2017 Vol 57 No 4 (2017): July 2017 Vol 57 No 3 (2017): May 2017 Vol 57 No 2 (2017): March 2017 Vol 57 No 1 (2017): January 2017 Vol 56 No 6 (2016): November 2016 Vol 56 No 5 (2016): September 2016 Vol 56 No 4 (2016): July 2016 Vol 56 No 3 (2016): May 2016 Vol 56 No 2 (2016): March 2016 Vol 56 No 1 (2016): January 2016 Vol 55 No 1 (2015): January 2015 Vol 55 No 6 (2015): November 2015 Vol 55 No 5 (2015): September 2015 Vol 55 No 4 (2015): July 2015 Vol 55 No 3 (2015): May 2015 Vol 55 No 2 (2015): March 2015 Vol 55 No 1 (2015): January 2015 Vol 54 No 6 (2014): November 2014 Vol 54 No 5 (2014): September 2014 Vol 54, No 6 (2014): November 2014 Vol 54, No 5 (2014): September 2014 Vol 54 No 6 (2014): November 2014 Vol 54 No 5 (2014): September 2014 Vol 54 No 4 (2014): July 2014 Vol 54 No 3 (2014): May 2014 Vol 54 No 2 (2014): March 2014 Vol 54 No 1 (2014): January 2014 Vol 53 No 6 (2013): November 2013 Vol 53 No 5 (2013): September 2013 Vol 53 No 4 (2013): July 2013 Vol 53 No 3 (2013): May 2013 Vol 53 No 2 (2013): March 2013 Vol 53 No 1 (2013): January 2013 Vol 52 No 6 (2012): November 2012 Vol 52 No 5 (2012): September 2012 Vol 52 No 4 (2012): July 2012 Vol 52 No 3 (2012): May 2012 Vol 52 No 2 (2012): March 2012 Vol 52 No 1 (2012): January 2012 Vol 51 No 6 (2011): November 2011 Vol 51 No 5 (2011): September 2011 Vol 51 No 4 (2011): July 2011 Vol 51 No 3 (2011): May 2011 Vol 51 No 2 (2011): March 2011 Vol 51 No 1 (2011): January 2011 Vol 50 No 5 (2010): September 2010 Vol 50 No 4 (2010): July 2010 Vol 50 No 2 (2010): March 2010 Vol 50 No 1 (2010): January 2010 Vol 50, No 5 (2010): September 2010 Vol 50, No 4 (2010): July 2010 Vol 50, No 2 (2010): March 2010 Vol 50 No 6 (2010): November 2010 Vol 50 No 5 (2010): September 2010 Vol 50 No 3 (2010): May 2010 Vol 50 No 2 (2010): March 2010 Vol 50 No 1 (2010): January 2010 Vol 49 No 6 (2009): November 2009 Vol 49 No 5 (2009): September 2009 Vol 49 No 4 (2009): July 2009 Vol 49 No 3 (2009): May 2009 Vol 49 No 2 (2009): March 2009 Vol 49 No 1 (2009): January 2009 Vol 48 No 6 (2008): November 2008 Vol 48 No 5 (2008): September 2008 Vol 48 No 4 (2008): July 2008 Vol 48 No 3 (2008): May 2008 Vol 48 No 2 (2008): March 2008 Vol 48 No 1 (2008): January 2008 Vol 47 No 6 (2007): November 2007 Vol 47 No 5 (2007): September 2007 Vol 47 No 4 (2007): July 2007 Vol 47 No 3 (2007): May 2007 Vol 47 No 2 (2007): March 2007 Vol 47 No 1 (2007): January 2007 Vol 46 No 6 (2006): November 2006 Vol 46 No 5 (2006): September 2006 Vol 46 No 4 (2006): July 2006 Vol 46 No 3 (2006): May 2006 Vol 46 No 2 (2006): March 2006 Vol 46 No 1 (2006): January 2006 Vol 45 No 6 (2005): November 2005 Vol 45 No 5 (2005): September 2005 Vol 45 No 4 (2005): July 2005 Vol 45 No 3 (2005): May 2005 Vol 45 No 2 (2005): March 2005 Vol 45 No 1 (2005): January 2005 Vol 44 No 6 (2004): November 2004 Vol 44 No 5 (2004): September 2004 Vol 44 No 4 (2004): July 2004 Vol 44 No 3 (2004): May 2004 Vol 44 No 2 (2004): March 2004 Vol 44 No 1 (2004): January 2004 Vol 43 No 6 (2003): November 2003 Vol 43 No 5 (2003): September 2003 Vol 43 No 4 (2003): July 2003 Vol 43 No 3 (2003): May 2003 Vol 43 No 2 (2003): March 2003 Vol 43 No 1 (2003): January 2003 Vol 42 No 9-10 (2002): September 2002 Vol 42 No 5-6 (2002): May 2002 Vol 42 No 11-12 (2002): November 2002 Vol 42, No 6 (2002): November 2002 Vol 42, No 5 (2002): September 2002 Vol 41 No 9-10 (2001): September 2001 Vol 41 No 7-8 (2001): July 2001 Vol 41 No 5-6 (2001): May 2001 Vol 41 No 3-4 (2001): March 2001 Vol 41 No 11-12 (2001): November 2001 Vol 41, No 6 (2001): November 2001 Vol 41, No 5 (2001): September 2001 Vol 41, No 4 (2001): July 2001 Vol 41, No 3 (2001): May 2001 Vol 41, No 2 (2001): March 2001 Vol 41 No 1-2 (2001): January 2001 Vol 39 No 9-10 (1999): September 1999 Vol 39 No 7-8 (1999): July 1999 Vol 39 No 5-6 (1999): May 1999 Vol 39 No 3-4 (1999): March 1999 Vol 39 No 11-12 (1999): November 1999 Vol 39 No 1-2 (1999): January 1999 Vol 39, No 3-4 (1999): March 1999 Vol 39, No 1-2 (1999): January 1999 Vol 38 No 9-10 (1998): September 1998 Vol 38 No 3-4 (1998): March 1998 Vol 38 No 11-12 (1998): November 1998 Vol 38 No 1-2 (1998): January 1998 Vol 37 No 9-10 (1997): September-October 1997 Vol 37 No 5-6 (1997): May-June 1997 Vol 37 No 3-4 (1997): March-April 1997 Vol 37 No 1-2 (1997): January-February 1997 Vol 37, No 9-10 (1997): September-October 1997 Vol 37, No 5-6 (1997): May-June 1997 Vol 37, No 3-4 (1997): March-April 1997 Vol 37, No 1-2 (1997): January-February 1997 Vol 36 No 7-8 (1996): July-August 1996 Vol 36 No 5-6 (1996): May-June 1996 Vol 36 No 11-12 (1996): November-December 1996 Vol 36, No 7-8 (1996): July-August 1996 Vol 36, No 5-6 (1996): May-June 1996 Vol 36, No 11-12 (1996): November-December 1996 Vol 35 No 1-2 (1995): January 1995 Vol 35 No 9-10 (1995): September 1995 Vol 35 No 7-8 (1995): July 1995 Vol 35 No 5-6 (1995): May 1995 Vol 35 No 3-4 (1995): March 1995 Vol 34 No 7-8 (1994): July 1994 Vol 34 No 5-6 (1994): May 1994 Vol 34 No 3-4 (1994): March 1994 Vol 34 No 1-2 (1994): January 1994 Vol 33 No 7-8 (1993): July 1993 Vol 33 No 5-6 (1993): May 1993 Vol 33 No 3-4 (1993): March 1993 Vol 33 No 1-2 (1993): January 1993 Vol 32 No 7-8 (1992): July 1992 Vol 32 No 5-6 (1992): May 1992 Vol 32 No 3-4 (1992): March 1992 Vol 32 No 11-12 (1992): November 1992 Vol 31 No 5-6 (1991): May 1991 Vol 31 No 3-4 (1991): March 1991 Vol 31 No 11-12 (1991): November 1991 Vol 31, No 11-12 (1991): November 1991 Vol 31 No 9-10 (1991): September 1991 Vol 31 No 7-8 (1991): July 1991 Vol 31 No 5-6 (1991): May 1991 Vol 30 No 11-12 (1990): November 1990 Vol 29 No 3-4 (1989): March 1989 Vol 29 No 1-2 (1989): January 1989 Vol 29, No 9-10 (1989): September 1989 Vol 29, No 5-6 (1989): May 1989 Vol 29, No 1-2 (1989): January 1989 Vol 29 No 9-10 (1989): September 1989 Vol 29 No 7-8 (1989): July 1989 Vol 29 No 5-6 (1989): May 1989 Vol 29 No 3-4 (1989): March 1989 Vol 29 No 11-12 (1989): November 1989 Vol 28 No 9-10 (1988): September 1988 Vol 28 No 7-8 (1988): July 1988 Vol 28 No 3-4 (1988): March 1988 Vol 28 No 11-12 (1988): November 1988 Vol 28 No 5-6 (1988): May 1988 Vol 28 No 1-2 (1988): January 1988 Vol 26 No 4 (1986): July 1986 Vol 25 No 5-6 (1985): May 1985 Vol 24 No 7-8 (1984): July 1984 Vol 24 No 1-2 (1984): January 1984 Vol 24 No 9-10 (1984): September 1984 Vol 24 No 7-8 (1984): July 1984 Vol 24 No 5-6 (1984): May 1984 Vol 24 No 3-4 (1984): March 1984 Vol 24 No 11-12 (1984): November 1984 Vol 24 No 1-2 (1984): January 1984 Vol 22 No 9-10 (1982): September 1982 Vol 22 No 7-8 (1982): July 1982 Vol 22 No 5-6 (1982): May 1982 Vol 22 No 3-4 (1982): March 1982 Vol 22 No 11-12 (1982): November 1982 Vol 22 No 1-2 (1982): January 1982 Vol 22, No 9-10 (1982): September 1982 Vol 22, No 7-8 (1982): July 1982 Vol 22, No 5-6 (1982): May 1982 Vol 22, No 3-4 (1982): March 1982 Vol 22, No 11-12 (1982): November 1982 Vol 22, No 1-2 (1982): January 1982 Vol 21 No 9-10 (1981): September 1981 Vol 21 No 7-8 (1981): July 1981 Vol 21 No 5-6 (1981): May 1981 Vol 21 No 3-4 (1981): March 1981 Vol 21 No 11-12 (1981): November 1981 Vol 21 No 1-2 (1981): January 1981 Vol 21, No 9-10 (1981): September 1981 Vol 21, No 7-8 (1981): July 1981 Vol 21, No 5-6 (1981): May 1981 Vol 21, No 3-4 (1981): March 1981 Vol 21, No 11-12 (1981): November 1981 Vol 21, No 1-2 (1981): January 1981 Vol 20 No 3-4 (1980): March 1980 Vol 19 No 9-10 (1979): September 1979 Vol 19 No 3-4 (1979): March 1979 Vol 19 No 11-12 (1979): November 1979 Vol 19 No 1-2 (1979): January 1979 Vol 18 No 9-10 (1978): September 1978 Vol 18 No 5-6 (1978): May 1978 Vol 18 No 3-4 (1978): March 1978 Vol 18 No 11-12 (1978): November 1978 Vol 18 No 1-2 (1978): January 1978 Vol 16 No 9-10 (1976): September 1976 Vol 16 No 3-4 (1976): March 1976 Vol 16 No 1-2 (1976): January 1976 Vol 15 No 9-10 (1975): September 1975 Vol 15 No 7-8 (1975): July 1975 Vol 15 No 3-4 (1975): March 1975 Vol 15 No 11-12 (1975): November 1975 Vol 15 No 1-2 (1975): January 1975 Vol 14 No 9-10 (1974): September 1974 Vol 14 No 7-8 (1974): July 1974 Vol 14 No 5-6 (1974): May 1974 Vol 14 No 3-4 (1974): March 1974 Vol 14 No 11-12 (1974): November 1974 Vol 14 No 1-2 (1974): January 1974 Vol 13 No 4 (1973): April 1973 Vol 13 No 3 (1973): March 1973 Vol 13 No 2 (1973): February 1973 Vol 13 No 1 (1973): January 1973 Vol 13, No 4 (1973): April 1973 Vol 13, No 3 (1973): March 1973 Vol 13, No 2 (1973): February 1973 Vol 13, No 1 (1973): January 1973 More Issue