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SAINS TANAH - Journal of Soil Science and Agroclimatology
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Articles 35 Documents
ESTIMATION OF SOIL ORGANIC MATTER ON PADDY FIELD USING REMOTE SENSING METHOD Habibi, Luthfan Nur; Komariah, Komariah; Ariyanto, Dwi Priyo; Syamsiyah, Jauhari; Tanaka, Takashi S.T.
SAINS TANAH - Journal of Soil Science and Agroclimatology Vol 16, No 2 (2019): December
Publisher : Universitas Sebelas Maret

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20961/stjssa.v16i2.35395

Abstract

Soil organic matter (SOM) is one of the important parameters in agriculture management, thus estimating its distribution on the land will be essential. Remote sensing can be utilized to map the SOM distribution in the large-scale area. The objective of this research was to determine the estimation of SOM distribution on the paddy field in Sukoharjo Regency, Indonesia using Landsat 8 OLI imagery. The sampling points were determined by purposive sampling based on an overlay of land use classification map of paddy field, NDSI (Normalized Difference Soil Index) map, and soil type map. The analysis method was used simple linear regression (SLR) and multiple linear regression (MLR) between SOM content and a digital number of Landsat 8 OLI imagery. The SLR analysis resulted that all band except band 1 and 5 of Landsat 8 OLI Imagery have the capability to estimating SOM. The MLR model based on best subset analysis resulted in the combination of bands 3, 4, 6, and 7 was the best model for estimating SOM distribution (R2=0.399).  The MLR model was used to create SOM distribution map on paddy field in Sukoharjo Regency and resulted in the SOM range of the area is distributed from very low (<1%) to moderate (2.1?4.2%) with the largest area was on low level (1?2%) about 11,028 ha. The result indicates that Landsat 8 OLI Imagery could be used for mapping the SOM distribution.
EFFECTS OF BORON FERTILIZATION ON SUNFLOWER GROWN ON LOW BORON SANDY SOIL Dhassi, Khalid; Drissi, Saad; Makroum, Kacem; Nasreddine, Fatimzahra; Amlal, Fouad; Aït Houssa, Abdelhadi
SAINS TANAH - Journal of Soil Science and Agroclimatology Vol 16, No 1 (2019): June
Publisher : Universitas Sebelas Maret

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20961/stjssa.v16i1.26114

Abstract

Agronomists evaluate soil boron fertility with the threshold of around 0.5 mg kg-1(hot water extraction). The nonappearance of boron deficiency on sunflower, when grown on low boron sandy soil, was investigated to test the validity of this boron guideline fertility. The soil boron content was around 0.19mg kg-1. Pot experiments were conducted during 2015 season and repeated during 2016 season. Six boron levels were applied to soil: (0, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 5, and 10mg kg-1) in 2015 and (0, 2, 5, 10, 15, and 20mg kg-1) in 2016. Boron was applied as Solubor-C (Na2B8O13.4H2O, 21% of boron). The results revealed that soil boron application did not enhance kernels weight and kernels oil and protein contents. However, boronsupplyhigher than or equal to 1mg kg-1 resulted in visible leaf damage. Also, a significant decrease in kernels weight was recorded at high boron levels (15 and 20 mg kg-1). The kernels boron content did not increase with a successive increase in dose of boron supply. It was sufficient, around 16mg kg-1, for all boron tested amounts. Also, plant content on other nutrients was not affected by boron application. The soil residual boron enrichment was around 0.3 mg kg-1 for each boron application of 2 mg kg-1.
THE EFFECTS OF BIOCHAR AND COMPOST ON DIFFERENT CULTIVARS OF SHALLOTS (ALLIUM ASCALONICUM L.) GROWTH AND NUTRIENT UPTAKE IN SANDY SOIL UNDER SALINE WATER Rahayu, Rahayu; Syamsiyah, Jauhari; Cahyani, Vita Ratri; Fauziah, Siti Kharisma
SAINS TANAH - Journal of Soil Science and Agroclimatology Vol 16, No 2 (2019): December
Publisher : Universitas Sebelas Maret

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20961/stjssa.v16i2.34209

Abstract

High salinity irrigation will cause nutrient uptake and shallot growth to deplete due to its sensitivity to salinity. This research aimed to investigate the effect of biochar and compost on shallot growth and nutrient uptake in sandy soil like Entisol when irrigated using salty water. This research carried out some pot experiments and put on the field using a completely randomized design. The first factor was based on the amendment with control of 20 tons ha-1 of Biochar, 10 tons ha-1 of compost, and a mixture of 10 tons ha-1 biochar and 5 tons ha-1 of compost; the second factor was composed of 3 shallot cultivars (Brebes, Pemalang, and Purbalingga). Each pot was filled with 15 kg of soil; the pot 30 cm in diameter, incubated with saline water and irrigated by 2 dS m-1. The results show that irrigation with ground saline water causes Entisol to increase exchangable Na, Ece and SAR, decrease exchangeable Ca and Mg. The application of all treatments decreased SAR. The application of compost significantly increased N and K uptake but made soil pH, EC, and SAR to decrease while fresh weight and dry weight of bulb in Brebes cultivars increased. The combination of biochar with 5 tons ha-1 of compost produced the highest yield on plant height and number of tuber in Pemalang cultivars and had the largest tuber diameter in Purbalingga cultivars. There is an interaction between amendment and cultivar on plant height, fresh weight of tuber (P<0.01), dry weight of tuber (P<0.01).
POTENTIAL USE OF ALKALINE-ACTIVATED INDONESIAN PUMICE POWDER AS LEAD ADSORBENT IN SOLUTION SYSTEM Hasanah, Faridlotul; Anwar, Syaiful; Hartono, Arief; Sudadi, Untung
SAINS TANAH - Journal of Soil Science and Agroclimatology Vol 16, No 2 (2019): December
Publisher : Universitas Sebelas Maret

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20961/stjssa.v16i2.34621

Abstract

Pumice is a volcanic material that found abundant in Indonesia. Owing to its physicochemical characteristics it can be utilized as a low-cost natural adsorbent for cationic contaminants. This study aimed to assess the performances of adsorbents prepared from NaOH-activated powder of Lombok and Kediri pumices for lead removal in solution systems based on their maximum adsorption capacity and removal efficiency parameters. The adsorption tests were done in batch experimentation using pumice powder of 74 ?m particle size activated with 0.5, 1, and 2 M NaOH and lead solutions with initial concentrations of 0-260 mg.L-1. The most favorable NaOH activation concentration for both pumices was 0.5 M which resulted from Lombok pumice prepared-adsorbent with Pb maximum adsorption capacity based on linearized conventional and rearranged Langmuir isothermal adsorption models of 236.4 and 186.3 mg.g-1, while those of Kediri pumice were of 218.4 and 210.8 mg.g-1, respectively. The removal efficiency of both adsorbents were >80% at the initial Pb concentration of <100 mg.L-1 and around 50-80% at 100-260 mg.L-1. Both pumices are therefore considered potential to be utilized as an adsorbent for cationic contaminants in solution systems with reliable performances.
PEANUT GROWTH AND GYNOPHORE FORMATION ON BORON AND PHOSPHOR APPLICATIONS Rahman, Novita; Suntoro, Suntoro; Sakya, Amalia Tetrani
SAINS TANAH - Journal of Soil Science and Agroclimatology Vol 16, No 1 (2019): June
Publisher : Universitas Sebelas Maret

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20961/stjssa.v16i1.25372

Abstract

Soil is an important factor in peanut cultivation as a nutrient provider. In recent years, peanut production has dwindled due to the decrease in soil fertility. Boron as a micronutrient can maximize peanut production through optimum viability of flowers and phosphor as essential nutrients for peanut to improve its pod filling. This study aims to examine the application of boron and phosphor growth and formation of peanut gynophore. The research was conducted from September 2017 to January 2018 in Sambirembe village, Magetan. The experiment uses randomized complete block design (RCBD) with the first factor applied on the dose of boron fertilizer (0, 1, 2 3 kg ha-1) and the second was on the dose of phosphor fertilizer (0, 75, 100, 150 kg ha-1), repeated 3 times. Boron application resulted in the highest plant height at the fourth week by 10.45%. The application of 1 kg ha-1 boron without phosphorus (0 kg ha-1) yielded the highest gynophore formation, i.e. 42 gynophore formation.
PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOCHEMISTRY OF FE EXCESS IN ACIDIC ASIAN SOILS ON CROP PLANTS Dey, Sangita; Kar, Saradia; Regon, Preetom; Panda, Sanjib Kumar
SAINS TANAH - Journal of Soil Science and Agroclimatology Vol 16, No 1 (2019): June
Publisher : Universitas Sebelas Maret

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20961/stjssa.v16i1.30456

Abstract

Proper transport of iron is very crucial for plant growth and development as it participates in various complex processes in plants like absorption, translocation etc. It also acts as an important component for processes like photosynthesis and respiratory electron transport chain in mitochondria, chloroplast development, and chlorophyll biosynthesis. Asian soils suffer from iron toxic condition and that adversely affects the growth and yield of the plant. This review describes the importance of iron in plant growth and different strategies adopted by plants for iron uptake. It also focuses on different methods and approaches on how plant can cope against acidic soils.
CHARACTERISTICS OF CORN COBS WASTE ACTIVATED CARBON FOR SLOW RELEASE MICRO FERTILIZER CARRIER Priyadi, Priyadi; Mangiring, Windu
SAINS TANAH - Journal of Soil Science and Agroclimatology Vol 16, No 2 (2019): December
Publisher : Universitas Sebelas Maret

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20961/stjssa.v16i2.25480

Abstract

The problem of Fertilization, especially micro fertilizers, is toxication due to the excessive application. Using the concept of slow release fertilizer is a very possible solution to overcome the problem. The objectives of this study are 1) to characterize corn cobs activated carbon for slow release micro fertilizer carrier, 2) to produce and to test of slow release micro fertilizer.The research was carried out by converting corn cobs into activated carbon with an activation temperature of 600 ?C and water vapor for 90 minutes. Production of slow release fertilizer was carried out by soaking activated carbon in a solution of CuSO4, FeSO4 and ZnSO4 1N for 24 hours. The results of micro fertilizer were then characterized, then the solubility test was carried out. The results of the characteristic analysis showed that some parameters that could be used as fertilizer carriers include, iodine adsorption 404.21 mg g-1, adsorption of methylene blue 16.88 mg g-1, the pore volume of 0.19 cc mg-1 and surface area of 315.77 m2 g-1. While, based on the results of micronutrient solubility test the highest nutrient content that can be absorbed by activated carbon (AA) is found in Cu, followed by Zn and Fe. It relates to the characteristics possessed by activated carbon namely specific surface area, pore volume, and nutrient diameter size. 
CURRENT EVIDENCE AND FUTURE PROJECTIONS: A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF THE IMPACTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON CRITICAL CLIMATE-SENSITIVE AREAS OF PAPUA NEW GUINEA Michael, Patrick S.
SAINS TANAH - Journal of Soil Science and Agroclimatology Vol 16, No 2 (2019): December
Publisher : Universitas Sebelas Maret

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20961/stjssa.v16i2.35712

Abstract

Climate change is a global concern arising from spatial or temporal changes in precipitation, temperature and greenhouse gases. The impacts of this on critical climate-sensitive areas are largely on land, marine resources, forestry and agriculture, and their biodiversity and ecosystems. In Papua New Guinea (PNG), the mainstay (85%) of the rural people is on land and agriculture, compared to resources obtained from the marine areas and forest. Productivity on land depends on climatic factors and a compromised climate affects land, which in turn affects forestry, agriculture and the marine environment (resources and ecosystems). Because of this, a lot of resources have been invested in climate change to understand the impacts; however, much is yet to be achieved, especially in the developing nations. In PNG, understanding the types of changes in climate that will be experienced is important to be resilient, to mitigate and to adapt. In this review, the potential impact of global climate change on climate of PNG and the impact of the new (future) climate on land, marine and forest resources and their biodiversity and ecosystems are analyzed. Moreover, the impacts on crop agriculture are discussed. Analysis of available data shows that the temporal and spatial changes in precipitation and temperature projections of the future climate are within current optimum crop production ranges, at least up to 2090. Since most staple and plantation crops in PNG are C3 plants, an increase in CO2 levels will have a fertilizing effect on productivity. The plastic effects on certain crops may benefit some farmers as temperature, precipitation and CO2 levels change.
AMENDMENTS ON SALINITY AND WATER RETENTION OF SAND BASE ROOTZONE AND TURFGRASS YIELD Rahayu, Rahayu; Mo, Yang Geun; Soo, Choi Joon
SAINS TANAH - Journal of Soil Science and Agroclimatology Vol 16, No 1 (2019): June
Publisher : Universitas Sebelas Maret

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20961/stjssa.v16i1.28132

Abstract

This research was column pot experiment with turfgrass was Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis) plant irrigated saline irrigation and the column soaked in saline water. Rootzone profile consisted of 20 cm using saline lake dredged up sand. The sand amendments of the root zone were soil, zeolite, bottom ash, and peat. The mixtures of topsoil were; 90% sand + 10% peat moss, 80% sand + 10% soil + 10 % bottom ash, 80% sand + 20% soil, 90% sand + 5% peat + 5% zeolite, and 80% sand + 20% bottom ash. Interruption layer with coarse sand with diameters over 2 mm of 20 cm and 10 cm loamy soil as the bottom layer of the column. The result showed that Kentucky bluegrass could grow in sand based growing media amended by peat, sandy loam soils, bottom ash and zeolite being irrigated by 2 dS m-1 saline water. Sand-based growing media amended by peat resulted in the highest clipping weigh but showed the highest salt accumulations. Sand amended by bottom ash and applied gypsum decreased clipping weigh, decreased SAR and increased calcium (Ca) when compared to the soil + peat (SP).  Sand amended by zeolite and gypsum decreased clipping weight, decreased sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) and higher Ca. Higher soil moisture retention of growing media promoted the growth of Kentucky bluegrass in spring, and lower moisture content promoted the growth in summer and fall season.
TREE CANOPY AND BLACK PLASTIC COVER ON FLOWERING, GROWTH, AND YIELD OF SOME PEAS Lestari, Novika Ayu; Supriyono, Supriyono; Triharyanto, Eddy; Nyoto, Sri
SAINS TANAH - Journal of Soil Science and Agroclimatology Vol 16, No 2 (2019): December
Publisher : Universitas Sebelas Maret

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.20961/stjssa.v16i2.25546

Abstract

Field bean (Dolichos lablab), adzuki bean (Vigna angularis), pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan) and winged bean (Psophocarpus tetragonolobus) are a group of peas or legumes which used as an alternative food beside groundnut, soybean or mung bean. The day length or planting season is one factor that affects plants to flower. Long day or bean offseason can inhibit plants to flower, especially for short-day plants. covering the plant from sunlight may trigger a quick flowering of plants. The purpose of this research was to find out how to prompt plants to flower, growth, and yield during the off-season period in a very short time. This research was conducted by using a Randomized Completed Block Design (RCBD) with 2 factors. The first factor was shortening the day length (control, black plastic cover for 2 hours day-1, plant under trees canopy covered) and the second factor was some kind of peas (field bean, adzuki bean, pigeon pea, and winged bean). Black plastic cover was used 2 hours a day-1 during 30 days after 14 days of plantation. The research was replicated 3 times. The results showed that field bean combinations with control and plastic closure gave a higher number of pods. For all field bean treatments, plastic-closure on pigeon pea and also winged bean provided higher straw fresh weight than control and plastic closure on adzuki bean and winged bean under the tree. Covering plants using plastic for 2 hours day-1 tends to increase e the total flowering number and seed yield at each plant. The growth component showed that field bean was higher than adzuki bean, winged bean, and pigeon pea. The effort to shorten a long day plantation had no significant effect on many variables due to climate anomaly in the 2017 rain show on start to finish this year. However, pigeon pea did not have flowers when planted on a long day or offseason period.

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