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Kawalu: Journal of Local Culture
ISSN : 23391065     EISSN : 24604313     DOI : -
Kawalu: Journal of Local Culture is an interdisciplinary journal that explores the history, politics, economics, linguistics, sociology and anthropology of world’s local culture. The journal brings together original and innovative articles which deploy interdisciplinary and comparative research methods add also welcomes progress reports on research projects, fieldwork notes, book reviews, and notes on conferences. Kawalu: Journal of Local Culture is published by Laboratorium Bantenologi, State Islamic University (UIN) Sultan Maulana Hasanuddin Banten in June and December each year. The journal accepts articles in English and Indonesia.
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Articles 6 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 3 No 1 (2016): January - June 2016" : 6 Documents clear
Micro-, Macro-, and Meta-Cosmos of Keduk Beji Ritual: Harmonising the “Un-/Living”Creatures Endriastuti, Annysa; Kusumo, Eko
Kawalu: Journal of Local Culture Vol 3 No 1 (2016): January - June 2016
Publisher : Laboratorium Bantenologi UIN Sultan Maulana Hasanuddin Banten

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Abstract

The process of how Javanese life worksin harmony with these three core relationships namely: human relations (microcosm), relationship with nature (macrocosm), and relationship with God (metacosm)is the main focus of this study. The people of Tawun District, Ngasreman, Ngawi, East Java,as the object of this study are likely to offer so much understanding, and indeed provide still, today, a harmonious concept of livingmanifested in the ritual ceremony of Keduk Beji (English: Beji scoop). This study then examines howthe construction of microcosm, macrocosm, and metacosm among Tawunpeople’sritual tradition of Keduk Bejiis put to work. The constructions are built upon the need for continuity and harmony in life. For the conclusion, this article’s preliminary result of the three relationships is centered on the relationship of metacosm as the last objectives of mankind before dealing withthe death. To fully support this field research article, a qualitative method is used to fully comprehend the analysis. Keywords: Microcosm, Macrocosm, Metacosm, Harmony, Keduk Beji
Kiai vis a vis Media Logic: Khaeroni, Khaeroni
Kawalu: Journal of Local Culture Vol 3 No 1 (2016): January - June 2016
Publisher : Laboratorium Bantenologi UIN Sultan Maulana Hasanuddin Banten

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Abstract

Internet becomes an integral part of current Indonesian society’s life. Meanwhile, the figure of kiai clearly cannot be separated from the history of Indonesian socio-religious life up until recently. Both the kiai and Internet are inseparable parts of current Indonesian social reality, in which, each of them possessed their particular share of power and ran according their own logics. Focusing on the case of Pandalungan Muslims community, where the kiai’s authority is greatly acknowledged, this paper will shed the lights on the logic behind those two powers and the contestation (for authority) occurred between them. This paper concludes that the logic of the kiai-ness is the logic of culture and media logic is in the logic of culture. This made the kiais’ authority is still standing strong in current media life. Keywords: Kiai, Internet, Pandalungan, Authority, Media Logic
President Yudhoyono’s Response to Violence against Ahmadiyah and Shia: Suryana, A’an
Kawalu: Journal of Local Culture Vol 3 No 1 (2016): January - June 2016
Publisher : Laboratorium Bantenologi UIN Sultan Maulana Hasanuddin Banten

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Abstract The era of President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono saw rising intolerance and even violence against minority congregations, Ahmadiyah and Shia; in the forms of attacks to places of worships; attacks to houses belonging to minorities, forced eviction targeting minorities and banning against religious activities.This article looks at what factors that contributed to President Yudhoyono’s response to the rising violence against the minority congregations during his two terms at the office (between 2004 and 2014). Scholars criticized the president for his seemingly in action in addressing the violence. Some scholars argued it was the agency of President Yudhoyono that contributed to his indifference toward the violence. Other scholars pointed out at more structural factors that they argued to have caused President Yudhoyono for being indecisive, ignorant or slow in making actions toward the rising intolerance, such as his childhood experience and family background and the revival of corporatist metaphor in the post-New Order era that impeded the president for making bold measures to fight for the minority rights. Through the case study of President Yudhoyono’s response to the violence, the article aims to contribute to Indonesian perspective on the classic debate about whether structure shapes the agency, or agency shapes the structure. In light of the arguments that the scholars proposed in the preceding paragraph, I would argue that we need to think of beyond binary opposition between agency and structure. Scholars, especially the essentialists, had the habit to determinatively point out at either agents or structures, which were held responsible for the occurrence of events, but, omitting either factor would ignore some aspects that had the potentials to enrich our understandings about what motivates the agents in making social actions. Keywords: Violence, Ahmadiyah, Shia, Minority Rights.
Politics of Local Occultism: Fawaid, Achmad
Kawalu: Journal of Local Culture Vol 3 No 1 (2016): January - June 2016
Publisher : Laboratorium Bantenologi UIN Sultan Maulana Hasanuddin Banten

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Abstract As a global occult practice, Tarot has been practiced by local people, including Javanese practitioners, and it is perhaps that a study of localization is necessary to determine how strongly influential Javanese belief system has been upon Tarot practitioners, or how Javanese Tarot practitioners have adopted and modified Javanese esoteric and occult practices into Tarot. My thesis is that localizing Tarot could be possible in terms of adaptation, acculturation, indigenization, or—in some extents—hybridization in Javanese society, either in the levels of superficial, practice, or values. By using ethnography as method of research, this study has resulted in two major findings: (1) Javanese Tarot practitioners have negotiated themselves in the cultic milieu they live in by localizing their alias, communities, Tarot reading strategies, Tarot decks, and their personal preference to gather in candi, and (2) Tarot practice in Java has closely been related to some Javanese belief systems, such as rasa and kahanan, and it makes them consciously or unconsciously practice Javanism in their daily activity of Tarot with different levels. However, these have implications and challenges they should deal with: cultural ambivalence, a cultural implication that they can’t be free from it, because as much as they play Western Tarot, they are still Javanese. This ambivalence also indicates an inseparable concept of globalization as dynamic one in the term of ‘localizing’. The idea of localizing Tarot makes it possible to be a global phenomena in which local Javanese belief system embedded into Javanese Tarot practice became a part of global network. The involvement of Javanese practitioners in e-commerce or international market suggests a juncture between particular occult practices and global ones to celebrate the cultural hybridity within Tarot. Keywords: Occult, Tarot, Javanism
From Arabic Style toward Javanese Style: Faizin, Nur
Kawalu: Journal of Local Culture Vol 3 No 1 (2016): January - June 2016
Publisher : Laboratorium Bantenologi UIN Sultan Maulana Hasanuddin Banten

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Moslem scholars have acceptedmaqamat in reciting the Quran otherwise they have not accepted macapat as Javanese style in reciting the Quran such as recitationin the State Palace in commemoration of Isra` Miraj 2015. The paper uses a phonological approach to accents in Arabic and Javanese style in recitingthe first verse of Surah Al-Isra`. Themethod used here is analysis of suprasegmental sound (accent) by usingSpeech Analyzer programand the comparison of these accents is analyzed by descriptive method. By doing so, the author found that:first, there is not any ideological reason to reject Javanese style because both of Arabic and Javanese style have some aspects suitable and unsuitable with Ilm Tajweed; second, the suitability of Arabic style was muchthan Javanese style; third, it is not right to reject recitingthe Quran with Javanese style only based on assumption that it evokedmistakes and errors; fourth, the acceptance of Arabic style as the art in reciting the Quran should risedacceptanceof the Javanese stylealso. So, rejection of reciting the Quranwith Javanese style wasnot due to any reason and it couldnot be proofed by any logical argument. Keywords: Recitation, Arabic Style, Javanese Style, Quran.
From Essentialism to Worldview: Saputro, M. Endy
Kawalu: Journal of Local Culture Vol 3 No 1 (2016): January - June 2016
Publisher : Laboratorium Bantenologi UIN Sultan Maulana Hasanuddin Banten

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Abstract

This paper aims to understand formation of indigenous knowledge production in Center for Religious and Cross-Cultural Studies (CRCS), Graduate School, Gadjah Mada University. One main question analyzed here is mainly focused on definitions of indigenous religions embraced by CRCS students. Consequently, CRCS students’ theses submitted in the CRCS library from 2003 until 2012 would be employed as the representative subject to look at the discourse of indigenous definition offered by the students. There are 29 of 192 theses located as the representative subject. I argue that there is a shifting paradigm of indigenous religion in CRCS from essentialism paradigm to worldview one. Keywords: Indigenous, Religion, Culture

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