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Kawalu: Journal of Local Culture
ISSN : 23391065     EISSN : 24604313     DOI : -
Kawalu: Journal of Local Culture is an interdisciplinary journal that explores the history, politics, economics, linguistics, sociology and anthropology of world’s local culture. The journal brings together original and innovative articles which deploy interdisciplinary and comparative research methods add also welcomes progress reports on research projects, fieldwork notes, book reviews, and notes on conferences. Kawalu: Journal of Local Culture is published by Laboratorium Bantenologi, State Islamic University (UIN) Sultan Maulana Hasanuddin Banten in June and December each year. The journal accepts articles in English and Indonesia.
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Articles 5 Documents
Search results for , issue "Vol 5 No 1 (2018): January - June 2018" : 5 Documents clear
Sundanese Sufi and Religious Diversity in the Archipelago: The Pluralistic Vision of Haji Hasan Mustapa (1852-1930) Rohmana, Jajang A
Kawalu: Journal of Local Culture Vol 5 No 1 (2018): January - June 2018
Publisher : Laboratorium Bantenologi UIN Sultan Maulana Hasanuddin Banten

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.32678/kawalu.v5i1.1873

Abstract

Abstract The paper aims to analyze moderate understanding of Haji Hasan Mustapa on religious diversity in the archipelago. He is a greatest Sundanese poet who has studied in Mecca and served as Hoofd Penghulu of Kotaraja Aceh and Bandung in the colonial era. This study is focused on sufism and religious diversity, Mustapa?s scholarship, and on his pluralistic vision, using intertextual studies and semantic analysis. This research argues that Mustapa has tolerance and moderate understanding similarly with Ibn ?Arabi?s thought. He uses kernel and husk as symbolic images which expressed using natural richness of Sundanese culture for demonstrating his religious conviction that rasa is the kernel of all religions. This study is significant for strengthening the discourse of religious pluralism from sufi perspective in the archipelago which cannot be separated from the chain of Islamic intellectual network. This research has also a significant impact on Chittick?s assumption about the depth of sufi poetry which mostly reveal their tolerance views on religious diversity living in harmony.
History of the Moluccan's Cloves as a Global Commodity Kadir, Hatib Abdul
Kawalu: Journal of Local Culture Vol 5 No 1 (2018): January - June 2018
Publisher : Laboratorium Bantenologi UIN Sultan Maulana Hasanuddin Banten

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.32678/kawalu.v5i1.1871

Abstract

Abstract This paper focuses on the history of spice trade in Moluccas. Using two main approaches of firstly, Braudel, I intend to examine the histoty of spice trade in Moluccas in the 16th century in relation with the changing of the structure of economy that affected the social and political relations of the Moluccans. Secondly, applying Wallerstein approaches, I find out that trading activities from the 16th century until today have created a wide gap between post-colonial Moluccas and the Europeans. To conclude, I argue that economic activities have always been accompanied by forcing political power, such as monopoly and military power. Consequently, they have created unequal relations between the state and society
Travel of Bonpo Gods from the Eurasian Borderlands to the Tibetan Culture Area and the Borderlands of North-east India Rajesh, M.N.
Kawalu: Journal of Local Culture Vol 5 No 1 (2018): January - June 2018
Publisher : Laboratorium Bantenologi UIN Sultan Maulana Hasanuddin Banten

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.32678/kawalu.v5i1.1874

Abstract

Abstract Popular writing has brought about an image of Hindu deities that are seen as a part of Hinduism only and Hinduism is also seen as a religion of the Indian subcontinent. While this may be largely true in many cases, it forces us to look at Hinduism in very Semitic terms as a closed religion. On the contrary we see that there was a considerable travel of gods and goddesses from other religions into Hinduism and vice versa. And thus negates the idea of Hinduism as a closed system. This therefore brings us to the problem of defining Hinduism which is by no means an easy task as there is no agreement on any singular definition. Pre-modern India had more contacts with her neighbours and thus central Asia and south East Asia emerge as some of the main regions where Indian influence is seen in many aspects of life. Even to a casual observer of both central Asia and South East Asia we see that there striking Indian influences in culture, religion and other aspects of life. All of them are not part of the textual literature that has become very nationalistic in the recent past and this tends to also dismiss the earlier writings as western Eurocentric. It is true that there is a great element of eurocentricism in the earlier writings but one point that needs to be highlighted is that these earlier writings also faithfully portrayed many aspects like iconography etc. in a very descriptive manner that focused on the measurements, likeness, colour and other associated characteristics of the statues. Such trends are clearly visible in the writings of Jas Burgess,E.B Havell etc. who were influenced by the dominant paradigm in contemporary Europe of the 1850?s where the duty of the historian was to just record. Such an approach was informed by the writings of the German philosopher Leopold Von Ranke. Though there are certain value judgments at the end of the chapter, the main narrative is a dry as dust and it is easy to decipher the characteristics or reconstruct the iconographic programme in any shrine and by extension the religious practices. In the modern period , where the dominant forms of anti-colonial struggles led to a writing of nationalist history succeeded by Marxist influenced social histories in many parts of Asia, the identification of the national boundaries and national cultures also extended to religions and many aspects were either muted or totally obliterated in history writing to present a homogenous picture. Thus, we have a picture of Hinduism and Buddhism that fits in with the national narratives. Such a collapse of categories is there in the borderland of India where the cultural boundaries are not clearly marked as also h religious boundaries. One single example that illustrates this assertion is the portrayal of Sri Lanka as a Sinhala Buddhist region with the Tamil regions of Sri Lanka marked off as separate entity and both being largely exclusive. In the Buddhist temples of Sri Lanka, one finds firstly the statue of Ganesha and later the images of Karthikeya and also the god Shani or Saturn. This image of a Buddhist monastery sharply contrasts with the highly buddhistic space of a Sinhala Buddhist temple where non-Buddhist elements are not found.  
Moral Values in Religious Myths of Bantenese Society Humaeni, Ayatullah
Kawalu: Journal of Local Culture Vol 5 No 1 (2018): January - June 2018
Publisher : Laboratorium Bantenologi UIN Sultan Maulana Hasanuddin Banten

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.32678/kawalu.v5i1.2040

Abstract

Abstract This article discusses moral values in various religious myths spread on several areas of Banten. How Bantenese society undertands and believes in  religious myths that spread out and are still maintained from generations to generations becomes one of the main focuses of this article; besides, it also tries to analyze the meaning and functions of religious myths for Bantenese society; and the moral values contained in religious myths of Bantenese society. This article is a field research using ethnographical method based on anthropological perspective. Library research, participant-observation, and depth-interview are methodes used to collect the data. Religious myths are one of Islamic literatures that still survive in Banten up to now. For Bantenese society, religious myths are considered having moral message and moral values. Religious myths, in some cases, also play significant roles and function for Bantenese society because they frequently contain moral values. Hence, many Bantenese people still maintain and transmit these religious myths to the youg generation.  
Magic and the Communist Revolt of 1926 in Banten: a Study on the Script of K.H. Muqri Labuan Ulumi, Helmy Faizi Bahrul
Kawalu: Journal of Local Culture Vol 5 No 1 (2018): January - June 2018
Publisher : Laboratorium Bantenologi UIN Sultan Maulana Hasanuddin Banten

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.32678/kawalu.v5i1.1872

Abstract

Abstract Studies on magic in civil revolts in Indonesia are remarkably scarce. The use of magic in Bantenese revolts are presented in the works of Kartodirdjo (1966) and Williams (1982,1990). This article explains several aspects of magic such as the form, the ritual, and thesources related to magic sourced from the Script of K.H. Muqri Labuan, one of the important figures in the communist revolt of 1926 in Banten, by using philological and historical approaches. The Script was written byK.H. Muqri during his escapee from Surabaya to Mecca when the Dutch colonial could defeat his rebellion in Labuan. His script is 17,5x21 cm consisted of 540pages written in Jawiand Arabic.  It mostly contains the magical formula and wird of severaltariqa. It also comprises his genealogy, the magical licence (ijâzah)he obtained, his journey notes to Mecca, his activities during living in Mecca, and the list of his disciples.

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