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INDONESIA
WARTAZOA. Indonesian Bulletin of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
Published by Kementerian Pertanian
ISSN : 02166461     EISSN : 23546832     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
Scientific review of the latest reviews/research results in the field of animal and veterinary sciences, and. Analysis, assessment of policy and ideas related to veterinary and animal husbandry.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 392 Documents
Prolactin as a Candidate Gene Controlling Molting and Egg Production of Duck Susanti, Triana
WARTAZOA. Indonesian Bulletin of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 25, No 1 (2015): MARCH 2015
Publisher : Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (192.059 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/wartazoa.v25i1.1125

Abstract

Incidence of molting is a crucial problem in the local ducks that need to be handled from many aspects including genetic aspect. Handling of molting genetically can be done quickly and accurately when the control genes have been found. The search for marker genes of molting can be conducted in poultry through broodiness naturally, because its physiological processes are related to the continuity of egg production. This paper describes the mechanism of molting, the relationship of molting with prolactin hormone and the association of prolactin gene polymorphism with molting and egg production. Molting and egg production were influenced by the prolactin hormone, that may be controlled by the prolactin gene. High concentration of prolactin hormone will inhibit the function of pituitary gland, decreasing production of gonadotrophin hormone (follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone) hence ovulation ceased. This will stop egg production and at the same time molting proccess occurred. Key words: Prolactin gene, molting, egg production, duck
Molecular Biology Review: Tumor Suppressor Gene (P53) as Target for Cancer Gene Therapy Dharmayanti, N L P Indi
WARTAZOA. Indonesian Bulletin of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 13, No 3 (2003): SEPTEMBER 2003
Publisher : Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (415.679 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/wartazoa.v13i3.782

Abstract

Cancer cells are accumulation of numerous genetic alteration that contribute to tumorigenesis, tumor progression and chemotherapeutic drug resistance. Most of these alteration affect the regulation of the cell cycle. In normal cells, a balance is achieved between proliferation and cell death by tightly regulating the progression through the cell cycle with cell cycle with cellular checkpoints. The accumulation of genetic alterations also contributes to enhanced chemoresistance, resulting from the loss of the ability to respond to DNA damage. The detection of DNA damage is governed by tumor suppressor p53.  Following DNA damage, p53 arrest the cell to allow time for repair, or if the damage is extensive enough, p53 initiates programmed cell death or apoptosis. Loss of these various molecular checkpoint has been found to underlie the development of many tumors because cell cycle progression becomes dysregulated. Therefore a major strategy in gene therapy for cancer has focused on replacing the tumor suppressors in cancer cells. p53-gene therapy remains the most important tumor suppressor strategy being developed and its combination with chemotherapy or radiotherapy may prove to be even more beneficial. However, p53 may not represent the ideal choice for gene therapy in all cancers. In tumor that overexpress MDM2 or have HPV16 E6, other tumor suppressors such as p21 may be more desirable targets of gene therapy because they can bypass the inactivation of p53. Several problem still need to be resolved. First, an efficient vector needs to be designed that cause prolonged high expression of the transduced gene while only targeting cancer cells. Second, further criteria need to be established in scheduling the decision about which tumor suppressor to employ for gene therapy.   Key words: Tumor suppressor gene (p53), gene therapy, cancer
The Use of Bali Cattle on Local Feed Resources for Beef Cows Development in Indonesia Diwyanto, Kusuma; Priyanti, Atien
WARTAZOA. Indonesian Bulletin of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 18, No 1 (2008): MARCH 2008
Publisher : Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (98.78 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/wartazoa.v18i1.910

Abstract

Bali cattle as an animal genetic resource of Indonesia is one of the appropriate cattle breed to be developed in Indonesia. Intensification of breeding program using Bali cattle may solve one of the heifer supply shortage in the beef cattle industry. Technology innovation base on the local feed resources and the use of agricultural by products is needed to meet the demand of sustainable feed supply for beef cattle. This will be the main basic components on the complete feed formulation that is cheap and easily accessible for the farmers. The crop livestock systems innovation through the zero waste approach need to be implemented to yield the zero cost cattle raising system. The cow calf operation system will only be run sustainable if the feed cost and the use of external inputs can be minimized. The program need to be integrated by the grower and fattening (finisher) activities. The grower cattle activities, such as run by the Center Village Cooperation in East Nusa Tenggara  could afford the farmers participation and had a significant contribution to the farmers’ household. The success of an introduction program is largely determined by the involvement of the farmers in the very beginning based on the local indigenous technology. There is a need to empower the farmers group based on the cooperative principles to increase bargaining power, information accessibility and communication effectiveness. This effort will also simultaneously conducted with the policy support on accessibility of micro finance through the agriculture credit scheme.   Key words: Bali cattle, local feed, beef cattle business
Competitive Power of Livestock Farming Towards 2020 Simatupang, Pantjar; Hadi, Prajogo U
WARTAZOA. Indonesian Bulletin of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 14, No 2 (2004): JUNE 2004
Publisher : Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1377.376 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/wartazoa.v14i2.805

Abstract

In the decade of 1990s animal husbandry revolution started to occur and it is estimated to continue for the next 20 years. Contrary to the green revolution in which the main activator is technology innovations on the production, i.e. the discoveries of short life high-yielding varieties, the prime activator in animal husbandry revolution is the increasing demand. The demand on livestock products in the local markets is estimated to increase in line with the increase in income per capita and total population growth. It is projected that Indonesia will still have meat production deficit of around 2.7 million tons in 2020. This deficit is a local market huge opportunity to be exploited. As an archipelago, Indonesia has a less comparative superiority to develop grassfed livestock farming system, such as beef cattle, buffalo, goat and sheep, with a result that the competitive power of Indonesia lies on grain-fed livestock farming system, i.e. broiler and layer chickens. Therefore, in order to develop farming and simultaneously improve the comparative power of Indonesian livestock farming by considering the diversity of biophysical of the regions and the social economic potency (including the huge local markets), it is necessary to develop specific location technologies for grain-fed intensive farming orienting at the local market demand and at the same time also facilitate the grassfed fanning system so it does not extinct. Key words: Developing livestock farming
Utilization of Tannin Containing Shrub Legumes for Small Ruminant Production in Indonesia Wina, Elizabeth
WARTAZOA. Indonesian Bulletin of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 20, No 1 (2010): MARCH 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (147.878 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/wartazoa.v20i1.945

Abstract

Shrub legumes have been well established in Indonesia and some of which contain significant levels of tannin. Several methods of tannin analysis have been conducted and correlated with its biological property of tannin. Total phenolics and total tannin measured by Folin Ciocalteau have a high correlation with the biological assay of tannin using gas in vitro method. Tannin values measured by the above methods negatively correlated with protein digestibility. Several feeding experiments on tannin containing shrub legumes using Calliandra calothyrsus as a model plant have been conducted. Feeding in fresh condition or silage form is the best way of feeding tannin containing forages. Several methods were tested to deactivate tannin include PEG addition, soaking in water or alkaline solution. Starch addition is one of the alternatives to mask the effect of tannin as it improved the performance of sheep fed tannin-containing legumes. Cofeeding with other leguminous leaves is another technique to utilize tannin in shrub legumes as protein binding agent. Several experiments showed that tannin could reduce the worm burden in ruminant although its utilization as anthelminthic agent in Indonesia is still limited. In conclusion, tannin containing shrub legumes have several beneficial effects to improve small ruminant production. Key words: Tannin, legumes, protein binding, anthelmintic agent, small ruminant
Some Pathogenic Bacteria of Livestock Origin as a Cause of Foodborne Diseases Kusumaningsih, Anni
WARTAZOA. Indonesian Bulletin of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 20, No 3 (2010): SEPTEMBER 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (98.501 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/wartazoa.v20i3.933

Abstract

Food are essentialy required for cell metabolism in human physiologyc. Food should be free from biological, chemical, and physical contamination and also hazardous substances. All of them are able to disrupt physiological homeostatis resulting disorder or diseases. Diseases resulted by those contaminant are called food borne disease. One of the important contaminants is biological contaminant especially pathogenic bacterias. Some pathogenic bacteria such as Salmonella spp., Escherichia coli, Bacillus anthracis, Clostridium spp., Listeria monocytogenes, Campylobacter spp., Vibrio cholerae, Enterobacter sakazakii, Shigella, are able to cause symptomatic diseases. Overall, the general symptoms of the diseases due to pathogenic bacterial infection are gastric pain, nausea, vomit, headache, loss of appetite, fever, and also dehydration. Key words: Pathogenic bacteria, foodborne diseases, food
Processing of Meat With Marination System for Increasing Food Safety and Added Value ., Nurwantoro; Bintoro, V P; Legowo, A M; Purnomoadi, Agung
WARTAZOA. Indonesian Bulletin of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 22, No 2 (2012): JUNE 2012
Publisher : Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (236.574 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/wartazoa.v22i2.851

Abstract

In broad perspective, meat contains many essential nutrients such as protein, fat, minerals, carbohydrates (minor amount) and water. The existence of these nutrients render meat not only as a nutritious food, but also potential as a media for bacterial growth, so that it needs to be further processed. One of the methods to process meat is by soaking the meat in a marinade solution (marination). There are three treatments that maybe performed on meat in the marination system. The first method is using phosphate salt solution to enhance the water holding capacity. The second method is utilizing the acidic salt solution or organic acids to soften the meat and control the bacteria growth. The third method is using spicy solution that can be combined with sugar, salt (NaCl) and organic acids to improve the physical performance and taste of meat as well as to control the growth of bacteria. It is concluded that marination of meat could increase physical, chemical, microbiological properties and sensory. Key words: Marination, meat, safety
Synthesis of Zinc Nanoparticles Using Plant Extract for Broiler’s Feed Additive hidayat, cecep
WARTAZOA. Indonesian Bulletin of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 28, No 3 (2018): September 2018
Publisher : Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (338.096 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/wartazoa.v28i3.1833

Abstract

Nanotechnology has been developed in various fields, included animal nutrition. Nanotechnology made the feed ingredient feed aditive and supplement in nano size, to expand the surface of the material, hence, its biological function in metabolic processes will be enhanced in the animal body. This paper will discuss the production of nanoparticle Zinc (Zn) by green synthesis method using phytogenic compounds from plant extracts as bioreductor and biostabilizer. The nano-Zn product is added into poultry diet as feed additive. The nanoparticle of Zn increased Zn bioavailability in broiler diet. Its utilization in lower doses is more efficient compared to conventional forms. The use of nanoparticle Zn has positive effect in improving growth performance and immunity status. The doses of nano Zn is 20-90 mg/kg, lower than the dose of non-nanoparticle form of Zn (40-120 mg/kg). Low doses will reduce production costs and decrease the amount of excreted Zn, which will reduce pollution to the environment. Zn nanoparticles are also reported to have antibacterial and antioxidant functions which will improve health performance of broilers.
Infectious Bronchitis (IB) Disease and its Control in Chicken Indriani, Risa; ., Darminto
WARTAZOA. Indonesian Bulletin of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 9, No 2 (1999)
Publisher : Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (274.556 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/wartazoa.v9i2.723

Abstract

Infectious Bronchitis (IB) is an acute, highly contagious viral respiratory disease of chicken’s caracterized by tracheal rallies, coughing, sneezing and nasal discharge in young chicks. In addition, the disease may affect kidhney, and in laying flock there is usually a drop in egg production and quality. IB is a major negative economic importance in poultry industry because the disease causes poor weight gain and feed efficiency, mortality in young chicks, reduction in egg production and egg quality in laying flock. IB is distributed worldwide and has been reported to be present in Indonesia. IB is caused by virus of a member of Coronaviridae under genera of Coronavirus. Spreading of IB virus among chickens usually by inhalation. Diagnosis of the disease can be based on the isolation and identification of the virus using embryonated chicken eggs and trachea organ culture. There is no treatment available for IB, so the control of the disease is mainly by vaccination. The existence of multiple serotipes of IB virus requires vaccines which are represent the antigenic spectrum of field isolates. To ensure the results of vaccination program, monitoring antibody titers following vaccination is recommended. The most widely used serological test for antibody monitoring is an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or Haemaglutination Inhibition (HI) test.   Key words: IB, virus, chicken, control
The Economic Impact of Merapi Volcano Eruption in Livestock Farming Systems Priyanti, Atien; Ilham, Nyak
WARTAZOA. Indonesian Bulletin of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 21, No 4 (2011): DECEMBER 2011
Publisher : Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (189.744 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/wartazoa.v21i4.959

Abstract

Merapi volcano eruption has impact significantly to the most of surrounding farming areas, including livestock, which belongs to rural peoples as the main sources of income. Estimated loss of economic values of resources amounted to IDR 5821 billion, covering among others: salak pondok, farm animals (dairy, beef cattle, buffaloes, sheep, goats and poultry) and food crops (maize and rice field) business. The areas mostly hit by the eruption include the districts of Boyolali, Klaten and Magelang of Central Java, and District of Sleman in DIY. Livestock sub sector of the economy in these areas suffers losses in terms of death of animals, sold and unsold animals, fodder crops, and reduced of milk production. It has been estimated that these losses have reached IDR 88,320 billion. Rehabilitation and reconstruction programs are necessary for both short and longer terms efforts to recover people livelihood which derived particularly from livestock farming. Key words: Economic impact, Merapi eruption, livestock farming

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