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Journal of Game, Game Art, and Gamification (JGGAG)
ISSN : -     EISSN : 2548480X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Science, Art,
The Journal of Games, Game Art, and Gamification (JGGAG) is a double blind peer-reviewed interdicipinary journal that publishes original papers on all branches of the academic areas and communities.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 5 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 3, No 1 (2018)" : 5 Documents clear
Indonesian History Educational Card Game Gamification of the Process of Learning to Increase Interest in History among Children. Ali, Wildan; Basiroen, Vera Jenny; Fang, Clara
Journal of Game, Game Art, and Gamification (JGGAG) Vol 3, No 1 (2018)
Publisher : Binus University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (440.469 KB)

Abstract

To spark interest and curiosity in children to make them research more about the subject. The writers also aims to re-tell history in a more visual manner which is more attractive to children as oppose to currently used text heavy history book and to make history more interesting by using an interactive teaching method by using gamification.
Introducing Gamification Methods To High School Student At Bina Nusantara University Alam Sutera Utoyo, Arsa Widitiarsa
Journal of Game, Game Art, and Gamification (JGGAG) Vol 3, No 1 (2018)
Publisher : Binus University

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Abstract

Exploration studies in this article highlighted approaches that wearable to increase the value of gamification method to examine the impact of the role of facilitator in the idea of the group. Through the activities, the children of high school/high school were invited as respondents. This activity aimed to stimulate creativity to produce a different settlement with the same results. The presentation material and workshops that used materials of paper and stationeries. Finally, this article outlines recommendations for teaching, learning, and apply gamification in decision making. This method is one of the modern methods of teaching and learning. It starts with forming groups, job descriptions, and the active participation of the students and by comparing the characteristics of the method by the way students learn gamification, the positive effects of this method on the educational attainment of students confirmed. Based on the finding of the study the researcher recommended encouraging faculty members to use gamification strategy in teaching, conducting more studies discussing this strategy and its relation to other variables such as critical thinking, conducting more studies on other samples from different study and age levels and from different environments. Keywords: gamification method, student, creativity, university students
The Effect of Gamified Teamwork on Business-related Idea Generation Trusova, Polina
Journal of Game, Game Art, and Gamification (JGGAG) Vol 3, No 1 (2018)
Publisher : Binus University

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Abstract

Innovation providing a competitive advantage to enterprises is based on original ideas usually developed by teams. Therefore, the optimization of idea generation in teams is crucial for the enterprises’ competitiveness and survival. The goal of this experimental study is to test whether idea generation in team can be made more effective in terms of quantity and quality through gamification (the use of game design elements in non-game contexts). Based on conservation of resources theory, in the present study gamification was assumed to generate and regulate task-related resources and therefore to increase the number and originality of generated ideas. 170 students divided in 70 teams were asked to imagine themselves to be a management team of a young innovative enterprise during a crisis meeting and to generate solutions for the described problems. 35 teams were randomly assigned to the gamification condition and another 35 teams to the control condition. The number and originality of ideas were evaluated by two independent condition-blind raters and compared between the conditions. Gamification has a large positive effect on the idea number and a medium-sized positive effect on the idea originality. The findings, implications and limitations are discussed.
The Design and Development of Backend System for a Game Application Tandey, Louis Joshua
Journal of Game, Game Art, and Gamification (JGGAG) Vol 3, No 1 (2018)
Publisher : Binus University

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Abstract

This paper is discussed a technical report regarding the backend system and the web application to manage the game and the API that the game client of Dishcover Indonesia will frequently request to a web application is one of the many ways that can be used to manage content that is saved on the backend for a system. An API is also a method. The author, part of a team development for a game, will attempt to provide a solution so that to easily maintain the content of the game and a method for the client to access with them.
Gamification of Immersive Meditation Practice in Virtual Reality Moroz, Matthew John; Calagiu, Bianca
Journal of Game, Game Art, and Gamification (JGGAG) Vol 3, No 1 (2018)
Publisher : Binus University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (233.495 KB)

Abstract

Benefits arising from meditation practice gamification are not overtly obvious. Desires to achieve and progress to higher levels, which are common to gaming, seem diametrically opposed to the ethos underlying traditional meditation practice. We propose, however, that a motivation to gain greater wellbeing and enlightenment via mindfulness meditation practice shares more with the motivation to progress through a game than is initially apparent. We begin by explaining how gamification techniques may be employed in meditation practice with a focus on mitigating the five hindrances to successful practice as described in the Theravada tradition. We then highlight the utility of employing virtual reality as a medium for such simulations. We discuss the potential for beneficial therapeutic applications in patients with mental health disorders and prison populations. We conclude by summarising our position and urging increased attention in this increasingly relevant area of research.

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