cover
Contact Name
Paramita Atmodiwirjo
Contact Email
paramita@eng.ui.ac.id
Phone
-
Journal Mail Official
interiority@eng.ui.ac.id
Editorial Address
"Department of Architecture Faculty of Engineering, Universitas Indonesia Kampus UI, Depok 16424 Indonesia"
Location
Kota depok,
Jawa barat
INDONESIA
Interiority
Published by Universitas Indonesia
ISSN : 26146584     EISSN : 26153386     DOI : 10.7454
The journal presents the discourses on interiority from multiple perspectives in various design-related disciplines: architecture, interior design, spatial design, and other relevant fields. The idea of interiority emphasises the internal aspects that make and condition the interior, which might be understood and manifested through the users’ inhabitation, through the materiality of objects and built environment as well as through specific methods and approaches of design practice. The journal addresses the idea of interiority as both experienced and practised, which might be examined through theoretical discussion, spatial design practice and empirical interior research.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 7 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 1 No 2 (2018)" : 7 Documents clear
Perceptions of Spatiality: Supramodal Meanings and Metaphors in Therapeutic Environments Liddicoat, Stephanie
Interiority Vol 1 No 2 (2018)
Publisher : Department of Architecture Faculty of Engineering Universitas Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (417.524 KB) | DOI: 10.7454/in.v1i2.17

Abstract

This paper explores the perceptions of the spatiality of individuals who self-harm, with the aim of understanding the design aspects which foster supportive therapeutic environments. Analysis of responses found that there were key similarities in areas of perception of architectural interior space, refuting the commonly held view that all architectural response is purely subjective, and that subjective experience cannot be shared. Three examples of perceptions of interior therapeutic environments are discussed to highlight how the perceptions of spatiality of individuals who self-harm consists of a particular cluster of spatial understandings, behaviours and focuses, manifesting as a strong emotional overtone overlaid onto built environments. This includes common kinds of triggers and emotional reactions provoked by aspects of the built environment. This paper discusses architectural aspects in relation to subjectivity in perception, constructs of interiority, and the role of supramodal engagement in influencing perceptual responses to interior space. By understanding how individuals who self-harm experience a space, a greater comprehension of the design of these environments delivering mental health services may be enabled. This paper tables a series of research-derived design suggestions to facilitate supportive therapeutic spaces. This paper also proposes a series of further research directions to explore the relationships between constructs of interiority, the physical interior space, and the therapeutic function for which they are designed.
INsideVisible Cities: Transcending Substance Vrabcheva, Zarya
Interiority Vol 1 No 2 (2018)
Publisher : Department of Architecture Faculty of Engineering Universitas Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (879.685 KB) | DOI: 10.7454/in.v1i2.18

Abstract

The interior, as one of the most human and sensual forms of architecture, is an intimate connection with the built environment and a powerful tool in provoking and altering the human mind, stimulating its curiosity, desires and solutions by way of visible and ambient matter. I aspire to explore the sense of interiority as betweenness, a space of transition in which both the human and the architecture body transcend from one state to another through empathetic interaction. Empathy, besides the ability to feel and experience someone else’s emotions and mental state, also depicts our capacity to feel and experience situations, surroundings and non-living bodies. Interiority encounters three states of empathy in which our capacities of memory, imagination and illusion convey the invisible relationships we have with spaces and inanimate matter. Memory conveys the ability of both humans and space to encapsulate presence, activity and emotion through time. Imagination is our capacity to dream and inject a space with our own vision, shape and create new worlds. Illusion, on the other hand, forms a vigorous relationship with the human being through projecting its character and influence onto our minds. The interiority I seek to illustrate surpasses the rationalities, containment and materiality it is commonly related and rather stimulates curiosity in our being, revealing the qualities of a space as a living organism - growing, living, talking, affecting, absorbing, aging and eventually dying...
Some Distinctive Features of Narrative Environments Austin, Tricia
Interiority Vol 1 No 2 (2018)
Publisher : Department of Architecture Faculty of Engineering Universitas Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (583.384 KB) | DOI: 10.7454/in.v1i2.20

Abstract

This paper explores key characteristics of spatial narratives, which are called narrative environments here. Narrative environments can take the form of exhibitions, brand experiences and certain city quarters where stories are deliberately being told in, and through, the space. It is argued that narrative environments can be conceived as being located on a spectrum of narrative practice between media-based narratives and personal life narratives. While watching a screen or reading a book, you are, although often deeply emotionally immersed in a story, always physically ‘outside’ the story. By contrast, you can walk right into a narrative environment, becoming emotionally, intellectually and bodily surrounded by, and implicated in, the narrative. An experience in a narrative environment is, nonetheless, different from everyday experience, where the world, although designed, is not deliberately constituted by others intentionally to imbed and communicate specific stories. The paper proposes a theoretical framework for space as a narrative medium and offers a critical analysis of two case studies of exhibitions, one in a museum and one in the public realm, to support the positioning of narrative environments in the centre of the spectrum of narrative practice.
indeterminate duration Carey, James
Interiority Vol 1 No 2 (2018)
Publisher : Department of Architecture Faculty of Engineering Universitas Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1015.726 KB) | DOI: 10.7454/in.v1i2.25

Abstract

Interiority, in relation to my practice, is the inherent curiosity to the notions of process, time and duration. It is a practice of mark making, marking time, making time, and time making; foregrounding duration and marking an occurrence. My technique is one of working responsively to interiors, allowing particular temporal conditions to surface within specific sites and situations. The marks – whether they be on a canvas, a house, a building, or within a gallery – materialise immateriality and allow the residue of particular processes to be assembled as collections of materialised and spatialised time. This paper discusses an artist residency undertaken in Detroit, USA 2017. Informed by existing watermarks, stains and rust encountered within abandoned spaces in Detroit, I initially responded by using found materials such as charcoal and ash from burnt houses, plant materials and liquids, to assemble process-based compositions on canvas. Further temporal interventions were then assembled in a number of situations within Detroit. This paper, and practice, notions that interiority is a field of interiors where the indeterminate is celebrated through the force of duration; immersion in time as flow. The temporal, material and immaterial are considered as a dynamic and confluence of forces; assembled in time, materialising immateriality.
Sensorial Interior: Museum Diorama as Phenomenal Space Edwards, Sarah
Interiority Vol 1 No 2 (2018)
Publisher : Department of Architecture Faculty of Engineering Universitas Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (792.649 KB) | DOI: 10.7454/in.v1i2.29

Abstract

Museum dioramas are widely recognised as historic visual tropes used to frame the grandeur of the outside world within an interior viewing space. With the development of digital technologies, data projection and soundscape have increasingly replaced diorama production as a means to transform these once static-animal-posed-in-painted- habitat with immersive interiors that engage the visual and aural senses alike. Andre Breton proposes that two modes of consciousness exist: an exterior world of facts and an interior world of emotions. These interiors and exteriors produce an interface and exchange. An invitation to respond to the interior of RMIT University’s First Site gallery provided an opportunity to experiment with the three traditional dioramic elements used to bring the exterior world into an interior employing taxidermy, model making and set painting. By engaging digital technologies in response to these three elements, I developed a sensorial interior, where the exterior world of facts was set into dialogue with the interior world of emotion. A physical encounter that expanded on ‘interior’ as an experiential, relational, phenomenal and emotive space.
Passage Territories: Reframing Living Spaces in Contested Contexts Paramita, Kristanti Dewi; Schneider, Tatjana
Interiority Vol 1 No 2 (2018)
Publisher : Department of Architecture Faculty of Engineering Universitas Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (340.984 KB) | DOI: 10.7454/in.v1i2.34

Abstract

This paper investigates the concept of ‘passage territories’ (Sennett, 2006), as living spaces constructed from one’s passage of movement from one separate space to another, and how it extends the discussion of interiority in contested contexts. Through observations of living spaces and the narrative accounts of dwellers’ in Kampung Pulo and Manggarai neighbourhoods of Jakarta, this study draws attention to the interiority of dispersed and layered spaces occupied by the kampungs’ dwellers. In this context, passage territories are driven by a) a limitation of space that, in turn, triggers the need to acquire more space; b) the occupation of a dweller that necessitates different types of space; and c) the limited access to infrastructural resources that influence the extent of a living space’s dispersal. Through the use of drawings, this study reveals the complete interiority of living spaces consisting of spaces with diverse spatial ownerships and scales. The boundaries of passage territories tend to be defned by the frequency and length of time needed for an activity instead of the relative proximity between certain spaces. Furthermore, the way objects are placed also shapes the boundaries of passage territories, both for permanent and temporary use of space. This paper then discusses the impact of this knowledge on the interiority of passage territories, proposing to use mechanisms of ‘patches’ and ‘corridors’ to shape the interior of territory that cross, share, and change into one another.
Editorial: Interiority as Relations Atmodiwirjo, Paramita; Yatmo, Yandi Andri
Interiority Vol 1 No 2 (2018)
Publisher : Department of Architecture Faculty of Engineering Universitas Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (63.401 KB) | DOI: 10.7454/in.v1i2.40

Abstract

Understanding the relations between human being and its environment is critical in our attempt to create an appropriate built environment. Interior as a discipline has a privilege to be in the intersection between subjective experience of human users and the physical manifestation of environment occupied by the human. Looking at interiority as a relational construct that occurs between the users and environment should be an essential basis for design practice. This issue of Interiority intends to explore various forms of relational construct that emerge in the interaction between space and the users and to identify possible challenges posed by such relations for spatial design practice.

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