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INDONESIA
Jurnal Perencanaan Pembangunan
ISSN : 25980807     EISSN : 26542625     DOI : -
JPP will periodically present papers related to development planning and policy in Indonesia, linking academic and scientific knowledge to public policy. JPP takes a position as one of the bridging knowledge to policy tools. The subjects are each development processes, from the planning, implementing, monitoring, and policy evaluation phases.
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Articles 63 Documents
Coal as the National Energy Supplier Forward: What are Policies to be Prepared? Hanan Nugroho
The Indonesian Journal of Development Planning Vol 1 No 1 (2017): April 2017
Publisher : Ministry of National Development Planning Republic of Indonesia/Bappenas

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Abstract

Indonesia’s energy security is critical, coal which is expected to be the backbone of national energy supply also faces considerable challenges. To overcome this, it is necessary to formulate a policy of production control, export restrictions, as well as concerning the economy, environment and infrastructure of coal. The paper recommends that: (i) Develop depletion policies to control coal production, (ii) Implement strict discipline in granting mining permits, (iii) Reduce coal exports through export taxes, (iv) Develop more appropriate DMO (domestic market obligation) policies (v) Utilizing coal as energy to drive activities and provide added value to the domestic economy, (vi) Increasing the application of clean coal technology, and (vii) Accelerating the development of transportation, storage, and utilization of coal to serve the needs of domestic demand
The Study of Development of Science and Technopark (STP) in Indonesia? Noor Arifin Muhammad; Muhyiddin; Ade Faisal; Istasius Angger Anindito
The Indonesian Journal of Development Planning Vol 1 No 1 (2017): April 2017
Publisher : Ministry of National Development Planning Republic of Indonesia/Bappenas

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Abstract

Development of Science and Technopark (STP) is one of the priorities in the RPJMN 2015-2019, with the target of building 100 STPs. The target is very ambitious and realistically cannot be achieved if the STP standards follow what has been established in the world such as Ideon Science Park (Sweden), Tsing Hua University Science Park (China), Daedeok Innopolis (Korea) and other STPs. Moreover, many proposals from various regions and ministries with a limited actual operational scope such as household industry centers, research demo plot, work-training center, etc., ask to transform into STPs following Government programs. Whereas through quick assessment only the proposed sites are mostly not potential locations to be developed as STP. For this purpose, best practices analysis of some of the world’s leading STPs is established to determine the standard requirements and the components that must be completed so that a site has the potential to be STP. Then, an analysis of some potential STP candidates in Indonesia related to development progress and future prospects was carried out. The end goal of this study is a general policy recommendation and roadmap for the development of STPs in Indonesia in accordance with STP standards.
Study of Domestic Water Mix Eko Wiji Purwanto; Candra Samekto; Nur Aisyah; Ardhiantie; Frieda Hazet; Amos Gracianto; Kariza Wiryanti
The Indonesian Journal of Development Planning Vol 1 No 1 (2017): April 2017
Publisher : Ministry of National Development Planning Republic of Indonesia/Bappenas

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Abstract

In the RPJMN 2015-2019, the domestic water mix is mentioned as an effort to optimize the various alternative domestic water sources available for the purpose of water utilization, including secondary water uses and water reclaiming. The domestic water mix in the RPJMN is part of the policy direction and strategy to build water security, complementing water-saving, water-saving, and water-keeping strategies. This concept is quite close to the term Integrated Urban Water Management (IUWM) and Water Sensitive Urban Design (WSUD) that some countries have developed. If the domestic water mix attempts to optimize the various alternatives of domestic water sources available then IUWM is a holistic approach to the competition of water use within a region. The domestic water mix is a new paradigm of water supply system by utilizing closed loop system, integrating the existing practice of conventional drinking water supply system by optimizing the potential of water source which has not been utilized yet. This paradigm first appeared in government planning documents, but the application has been done by stakeholders although still partially. This study aims to determine the condition of existing water treatment, best practices, and technological innovations that have been developed in support of the water mix system. The methods include the determination of hypotheses, secondary data collection, field survey, and evaluation, and look for alternative solutions. Lessons learned from the locations visited show the potential for utilizing the domestic water mix that can be done on an environmental, household, and area scales. All initiatives found in the field require support from the government, in the form of advocacy, facilitation, and policy interventions. Technical, socio-economic, financial and environmental and health aspects challenge the implementation of this new paradigm. A more in-depth study needs to be done to see the water mix optimization options at each coverage scale and analyze the aspects to consider before new paradigm applications are implemented. The follow-up study needs to be done with longer time and better funding to conduct a comprehensive pilot, deep analysis and assessment on a more grounded ground-level implementation.
Analysis of Economic Regulations of National Electrical Systems Yusuf Suryanto
The Indonesian Journal of Development Planning Vol 1 No 1 (2017): April 2017
Publisher : Ministry of National Development Planning Republic of Indonesia/Bappenas

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Abstract

The performance of the national electricity industry is inadequate. Improvements have so far ignored the highly centralized structure of the national electricity industry. Using the theory of industrial organization, comparative with developed countries, and considering the prevailing legal corridor, this paper recommends policy, in order to (i) create an un-centratious electricity system by establishing 5 electricity systems in Indonesia; (ii) continuing efforts to utilize shared networks Transmission (and distribution), and (iii) establishing the Electricity Industry Regulators. The main recommendation is to break-down the current PLN into 5 new electricity companies.
Indonesia’s Experience: Implementing Gender Responsive Planning and Budgeting Fithriyah
The Indonesian Journal of Development Planning Vol 1 No 1 (2017): April 2017
Publisher : Ministry of National Development Planning Republic of Indonesia/Bappenas

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Abstract

This paper is a historical review of Indonesia’s experience in implementing Gender Responsive Planning and Budgeting (GRPB). National Development Planning Agency/ Bappenas has initiated the implementation of gender mainstreaming in Indonesia’s national development planning policies since 1999. It was started in 1998 by developing the Gender Analysis Pathway, the tool for conducting gender analysis in development planning. The tool focuses on the gender gap analysis in four aspects: access, participation, control, and benefit of development, between men and women, and the special needs groups. In 2008, Bappenas initiated the GRPB Steering Committee and Technical Teams, which included Ministry of Finance in the board of GRPB’s Steering Committee, together with Bappenas and Ministry of Women Empowerment. The team also included Ministry of Home Affairs; Education; and Health, and formally established by Minister of NationalDevelopment Planning’s decree in 2009. In 2012, Bappenas developed The Gender Equity & Equality Index and Gender Mainstreaming Institutionalization Indicators to measure the progress of Gender Equality in Development. This was followed by the Circular Letter: “National Strategy to Accelerate Gender Mainstreaming through Gender Responsive Planning and Budgeting”, which was signed by four ministers. The National Strategy is developed to ensure that GRPB implementation both at the national and regional level is aligned, systemized, on target and also supporting the practice of good governance, sustainable development, as well as the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). In 2014, GRPB had been implemented in 36 line ministries and 34 provinces
The Institutional Study of Government Think Tank Muhyiddin; Guspika; Sumedi Andono Mulyo; M Firman Hidayat; Istasius Angger Anindito; Yogi Harsudiono
The Indonesian Journal of Development Planning Vol 1 No 1 (2017): April 2017
Publisher : Ministry of National Development Planning Republic of Indonesia/Bappenas

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Abstract

The government think tanks institution basically serves as a bridge between science and government policy. One of Bappenas duties and functions is as government think tanks. To find the appropriate institutional form, this study elaborates the institutional think tanks of foreign governments. This qualitative approach describes some of the best practice models including the Korean Development Institute (KDI) - South Korea, the National Institution for Transforming India (NITI) Aayog - India, the National Economic and Social Development Board (NESDB) - Thailand, and Productivity Commission (PC) - Australia. From these 4 institutional models, this study provides 4 alternative options as recommendations. First, the government can revitalize some organs in Bappenas to become a government think tank unit. If the Bappenas institution still holds the planning and budgeting functions, this is the best fit. It refers to NSEBD - Thailand. Second, transform Bappenas into a whole government think tank, with reference to NITI Aayog - India. Third, releasing work units implementing think tank functions at Bappenas to become a special think tank under Bappenas, with reference to KDI - South Korea. Fourth, new institutional think-tanks are formed under the president by utilizing the existing government think tanks institutional resources such as Bappenas and Research and Development Units underline ministries.
Development Planning Reborn Muhyiddin
The Indonesian Journal of Development Planning Vol 1 No 1 (2017): April 2017
Publisher : Ministry of National Development Planning Republic of Indonesia/Bappenas

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Abstract

Why Do Children Stay Out Of School In Indonesia? Tatang Muttaqin; Rafael Wittek; Liesbet Heyse; Marijtje Van Duijn
The Indonesian Journal of Development Planning Vol 1 No 2 (2017): September 2017
Publisher : Ministry of National Development Planning Republic of Indonesia/Bappenas

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Abstract

Municipal and household-level determinants for Indonesian children out of school are studied using multilevel analysis of 221,392 children in 136,182 households in 497 municipalities. The higher the poverty rate and public education expenditure per capita, the higher the likelihood that children drop out. However, a high(er) mean of municipality education expenditure significantly reduces children’s likelihood to never attend school while a high(er) poverty rate significantly increases the likelihood that children will never attend school. At the household level, expenditure, spending on education, and head of household’s educational background have a significant effect on reducing the number of children out of school.
Assessing the Impacts of Political and Economic Openness on GDP Growth: Case of Asian Countries Ichsan Zulkarnaen
The Indonesian Journal of Development Planning Vol 1 No 2 (2017): September 2017
Publisher : Ministry of National Development Planning Republic of Indonesia/Bappenas

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Abstract

The economic performance of a nation is measured in the gross domestic product (GDP). Over the last two decades, the rising of economic development in EastAsian accompanies openness in economic and political environment more than ever before. This paper seeks to figure out the pattern of how economic openness and political openness of Asian countries influence GDP growth by using panel method. We treat the GDP growth as the dependent variable and political rights, civil rights, trade liberalization, foreign direct investment as independent variables. I draw time-series data for 11 Asian countries: China, Japan, South Korea, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Thailand, Singapore, India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh from 1984 to 2011 using Freedom House, World Bank and United Nations Commission for Trade and Development (UNCTAD). Results, even though imperfect, show that high levels of political openness and economic openness indeed improve the economic development of China and Indonesia.
Complementary Model In Interaction Between Political Officials And Bureaucrats In Indonesia Deddy S. Bratakusumah
The Indonesian Journal of Development Planning Vol 1 No 2 (2017): September 2017
Publisher : Ministry of National Development Planning Republic of Indonesia/Bappenas

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Abstract

The relationship between politics and the bureaucracy or the political influence of the bureaucracy is a discourse that also surfaced in Indonesia. Various laws aremade to realize the Indonesian bureaucracy that is free from political influence. In fact, a complementary interaction between political officials and bureaucrats is anecessity in a bureaucratic system contained in Indonesia. The influence or control of political officials should be carried out within the framework of supervising the implementation of policies that have been decided in the political process and provide corrections to bureaucrats when finding errors or irregularities.